Projects  >  Roll Bar & Cage Projects  >  Camaro-Mustang Challenge and American Iron
Camaro-Mustang Challenge and American Iron Cage Projects

CMC and AI are very exciting road race classes. Including various body styles and generations of Camaros and Mustangs, CMC is a great class for budget-conscious racers who love the sound and feel of American V8 power. AI is a faster, less limited class that includes Camaros, Mustangs, Firebirds, GTOs and other American models. We have worked-on 35 roll bar and cage projects for Mustangs and F-Bodies, including 3rd and 4th generation Camaros; Foxbodies, SN95/New Edge and S197 Mustangs; and Firebirds.

NEW! Using our CAD software and programmable benders, we are now introducing custom-fitted, mail-order cages for these classes. Stay tuned for more information on these exciting new products!

Ken's SN95 Mustang

Ken's CMC Mustang was originally fitted with a cage from one of the popular mail-order companies. The old cage was legal, but did not fit well and was anchored to the floors, which made for a weak structure that did not provide chassis rigidity and relied on the weak, 15 year-old floors for its integrity. After seeing pictures on the Internet of a Mustang whose floor-mounted roll bar "punched-through" the floor during a rollover, Ken decided to cut-out his old cage and brought his car to Hanksville for a much more solid, structural cage.

After discussing different cage designs, Ken decided to build his new cage from 1.5" x .120" DOM tube. This is a smaller diameter than most CMC cars, which usually use 1.75" tube. However, since the target weight for Ken's car was just under 3,000 pounds, he opted to use the lighter-weight 1.5" tube and to then add extensive tube gussets to make the cage stronger. We usually use one of two structural areas for the main hoop mounts - on the rockers next to the B-pillar, or just behind the B-pillar on the rear seat riser. Ken chose to mount the main hoop on the rockers, but asked us to extend the mounting plates to the rear seat riser as well, to provide an even stronger foundation. We welded the rear brace mounting plates to the subframes and extended them to the shock towers for added strength. The forward hoops are mounted to the forward portion of the rockers, and the footwell connectors attach to the firewall and extend to the forward portion of the subframes. The additional mounting plate surface area is legal (each mounting plate is at or under 100 square inches) and adds some weight, but also adds extensive strength to the cage foundation.

We fitted the main hoop very tightly against the upper corners of the roof, and it tucks right next to the B-pillars for a great fit. The forward hoops also fit tightly to the body, contacting the roofline to give Ken the most headroom possible and contacting the length of the A-pillars to maximize forward visibility.

To triangulate the cage, we added a Petty bar to connect the main hoop to the passenger-side forward hoop plate. We also fitted a straight dash bar between the forward hoops to support the mid-section, and tied the dash bar into the footwell connector plate and the Petty bar. The cage also includes rear brace X-bars and tube gussets in the windshield bar and forward hoop areas, for further triangulation. To manage weight while also adding strength, many of the optional cage bars were made from smaller-diameter and/or thinner-wall tube.

 In addition to the cage, we fabricated a lightweight tubular seat mount with integral mountng points for the anti-sub belts, that was tied-into the cage via a lower main hoop crossbar. We also added pedal spacers and lowered the steering column to accomodate Ken's new rearward seating position. We attached the steering column to the dash bar for added strength. Additional projects included a custom tubular driveshaft loop, repair of a thin, weakened portion of the driver-side floor, shoulder harness guides, and a mounting plate for the cutoff switch. We also fitted and welded full-length subframe connectors, and welded/repaired weakened sections of the torque boxes/lower control arm mounts.

This was an extensive project that resulted in a much stronger cage for Ken's racecar. Thank you, Ken!






Ken's SN95 Mustang

Ken's CMC Mustang was originally fitted with a cage from one of the popular mail-order companies. The old cage was legal, but did not fit well and was anchored to the floors, which made for a weak structure that did not provide chassis rigidity and relied on the weak, 15 year-old floors for its integrity. After seeing pictures on the Internet of a Mustang whose floor-mounted roll bar "punched-through" the floor during a rollover, Ken decided to cut-out his old cage and brought his car to Hanksville for a much more solid, structural cage.

After discussing different cage designs, Ken decided to build his new cage from 1.5" x .120" DOM tube. This is a smaller diameter than most CMC cars, which usually use 1.75" tube. However, since the target weight for Ken's car was just under 3,000 pounds, he opted to use the lighter-weight 1.5" tube and to then add extensive tube gussets to make the cage stronger. We usually use one of two structural areas for the main hoop mounts - on the rockers next to the B-pillar, or just behind the B-pillar on the rear seat riser. Ken chose to mount the main hoop on the rockers, but asked us to extend the mounting plates to the rear seat riser as well, to provide an even stronger foundation. We welded the rear brace mounting plates to the subframes and extended them to the shock towers for added strength. The forward hoops are mounted to the forward portion of the rockers, and the footwell connectors attach to the firewall and extend to the forward portion of the subframes. The additional mounting plate surface area is legal (each mounting plate is at or under 100 square inches) and adds some weight, but also adds extensive strength to the cage foundation.

We fitted the main hoop very tightly against the upper corners of the roof, and it tucks right next to the B-pillars for a great fit. The forward hoops also fit tightly to the body, contacting the roofline to give Ken the most headroom possible and contacting the length of the A-pillars to maximize forward visibility.

To triangulate the cage, we added a Petty bar to connect the main hoop to the passenger-side forward hoop plate. We also fitted a straight dash bar between the forward hoops to support the mid-section, and tied the dash bar into the footwell connector plate and the Petty bar. The cage also includes rear brace X-bars and tube gussets in the windshield bar and forward hoop areas, for further triangulation. To manage weight while also adding strength, many of the optional cage bars were made from smaller-diameter and/or thinner-wall tube.

 In addition to the cage, we fabricated a lightweight tubular seat mount with integral mountng points for the anti-sub belts, that was tied-into the cage via a lower main hoop crossbar. We also added pedal spacers and lowered the steering column to accomodate Ken's new rearward seating position. We attached the steering column to the dash bar for added strength. Additional projects included a custom tubular driveshaft loop, repair of a thin, weakened portion of the driver-side floor, shoulder harness guides, and a mounting plate for the cutoff switch. We also fitted and welded full-length subframe connectors, and welded/repaired weakened sections of the torque boxes/lower control arm mounts.

This was an extensive project that resulted in a much stronger cage for Ken's racecar. Thank you, Ken!








Ken's SN95 Mustang

Ken's CMC Mustang was originally fitted with a cage from one of the popular mail-order companies. The old cage was legal, but did not fit well and was anchored to the floors, which made for a weak structure that did not provide chassis rigidity and relied on the weak, 15 year-old floors for its integrity. After seeing pictures on the Internet of a Mustang whose floor-mounted roll bar "punched-through" the floor during a rollover, Ken decided to cut-out his old cage and brought his car to Hanksville for a much more solid, structural cage.

After discussing different cage designs, Ken decided to build his new cage from 1.5" x .120" DOM tube. This is a smaller diameter than most CMC cars, which usually use 1.75" tube. However, since the target weight for Ken's car was just under 3,000 pounds, he opted to use the lighter-weight 1.5" tube and to then add extensive tube gussets to make the cage stronger. We usually use one of two structural areas for the main hoop mounts - on the rockers next to the B-pillar, or just behind the B-pillar on the rear seat riser. Ken chose to mount the main hoop on the rockers, but asked us to extend the mounting plates to the rear seat riser as well, to provide an even stronger foundation. We welded the rear brace mounting plates to the subframes and extended them to the shock towers for added strength. The forward hoops are mounted to the forward portion of the rockers, and the footwell connectors attach to the firewall and extend to the forward portion of the subframes. The additional mounting plate surface area is legal (each mounting plate is at or under 100 square inches) and adds some weight, but also adds extensive strength to the cage foundation.

We fitted the main hoop very tightly against the upper corners of the roof, and it tucks right next to the B-pillars for a great fit. The forward hoops also fit tightly to the body, contacting the roofline to give Ken the most headroom possible and contacting the length of the A-pillars to maximize forward visibility.

To triangulate the cage, we added a Petty bar to connect the main hoop to the passenger-side forward hoop plate. We also fitted a straight dash bar between the forward hoops to support the mid-section, and tied the dash bar into the footwell connector plate and the Petty bar. The cage also includes rear brace X-bars and tube gussets in the windshield bar and forward hoop areas, for further triangulation. To manage weight while also adding strength, many of the optional cage bars were made from smaller-diameter and/or thinner-wall tube.

 In addition to the cage, we fabricated a lightweight tubular seat mount with integral mountng points for the anti-sub belts, that was tied-into the cage via a lower main hoop crossbar. We also added pedal spacers and lowered the steering column to accomodate Ken's new rearward seating position. We attached the steering column to the dash bar for added strength. Additional projects included a custom tubular driveshaft loop, repair of a thin, weakened portion of the driver-side floor, shoulder harness guides, and a mounting plate for the cutoff switch. We also fitted and welded full-length subframe connectors, and welded/repaired weakened sections of the torque boxes/lower control arm mounts.

This was an extensive project that resulted in a much stronger cage for Ken's racecar. Thank you, Ken!








Ken's SN95 Mustang

Ken's CMC Mustang was originally fitted with a cage from one of the popular mail-order companies. The old cage was legal, but did not fit well and was anchored to the floors, which made for a weak structure that did not provide chassis rigidity and relied on the weak, 15 year-old floors for its integrity. After seeing pictures on the Internet of a Mustang whose floor-mounted roll bar "punched-through" the floor during a rollover, Ken decided to cut-out his old cage and brought his car to Hanksville for a much more solid, structural cage.

After discussing different cage designs, Ken decided to build his new cage from 1.5" x .120" DOM tube. This is a smaller diameter than most CMC cars, which usually use 1.75" tube. However, since the target weight for Ken's car was just under 3,000 pounds, he opted to use the lighter-weight 1.5" tube and to then add extensive tube gussets to make the cage stronger. We usually use one of two structural areas for the main hoop mounts - on the rockers next to the B-pillar, or just behind the B-pillar on the rear seat riser. Ken chose to mount the main hoop on the rockers, but asked us to extend the mounting plates to the rear seat riser as well, to provide an even stronger foundation. We welded the rear brace mounting plates to the subframes and extended them to the shock towers for added strength. The forward hoops are mounted to the forward portion of the rockers, and the footwell connectors attach to the firewall and extend to the forward portion of the subframes. The additional mounting plate surface area is legal (each mounting plate is at or under 100 square inches) and adds some weight, but also adds extensive strength to the cage foundation.

We fitted the main hoop very tightly against the upper corners of the roof, and it tucks right next to the B-pillars for a great fit. The forward hoops also fit tightly to the body, contacting the roofline to give Ken the most headroom possible and contacting the length of the A-pillars to maximize forward visibility.

To triangulate the cage, we added a Petty bar to connect the main hoop to the passenger-side forward hoop plate. We also fitted a straight dash bar between the forward hoops to support the mid-section, and tied the dash bar into the footwell connector plate and the Petty bar. The cage also includes rear brace X-bars and tube gussets in the windshield bar and forward hoop areas, for further triangulation. To manage weight while also adding strength, many of the optional cage bars were made from smaller-diameter and/or thinner-wall tube.

 In addition to the cage, we fabricated a lightweight tubular seat mount with integral mountng points for the anti-sub belts, that was tied-into the cage via a lower main hoop crossbar. We also added pedal spacers and lowered the steering column to accomodate Ken's new rearward seating position. We attached the steering column to the dash bar for added strength. Additional projects included a custom tubular driveshaft loop, repair of a thin, weakened portion of the driver-side floor, shoulder harness guides, and a mounting plate for the cutoff switch. We also fitted and welded full-length subframe connectors, and welded/repaired weakened sections of the torque boxes/lower control arm mounts.

This was an extensive project that resulted in a much stronger cage for Ken's racecar. Thank you, Ken!








Ken's SN95 Mustang

Ken's CMC Mustang was originally fitted with a cage from one of the popular mail-order companies. The old cage was legal, but did not fit well and was anchored to the floors, which made for a weak structure that did not provide chassis rigidity and relied on the weak, 15 year-old floors for its integrity. After seeing pictures on the Internet of a Mustang whose floor-mounted roll bar "punched-through" the floor during a rollover, Ken decided to cut-out his old cage and brought his car to Hanksville for a much more solid, structural cage.

After discussing different cage designs, Ken decided to build his new cage from 1.5" x .120" DOM tube. This is a smaller diameter than most CMC cars, which usually use 1.75" tube. However, since the target weight for Ken's car was just under 3,000 pounds, he opted to use the lighter-weight 1.5" tube and to then add extensive tube gussets to make the cage stronger. We usually use one of two structural areas for the main hoop mounts - on the rockers next to the B-pillar, or just behind the B-pillar on the rear seat riser. Ken chose to mount the main hoop on the rockers, but asked us to extend the mounting plates to the rear seat riser as well, to provide an even stronger foundation. We welded the rear brace mounting plates to the subframes and extended them to the shock towers for added strength. The forward hoops are mounted to the forward portion of the rockers, and the footwell connectors attach to the firewall and extend to the forward portion of the subframes. The additional mounting plate surface area is legal (each mounting plate is at or under 100 square inches) and adds some weight, but also adds extensive strength to the cage foundation.

We fitted the main hoop very tightly against the upper corners of the roof, and it tucks right next to the B-pillars for a great fit. The forward hoops also fit tightly to the body, contacting the roofline to give Ken the most headroom possible and contacting the length of the A-pillars to maximize forward visibility.

To triangulate the cage, we added a Petty bar to connect the main hoop to the passenger-side forward hoop plate. We also fitted a straight dash bar between the forward hoops to support the mid-section, and tied the dash bar into the footwell connector plate and the Petty bar. The cage also includes rear brace X-bars and tube gussets in the windshield bar and forward hoop areas, for further triangulation. To manage weight while also adding strength, many of the optional cage bars were made from smaller-diameter and/or thinner-wall tube.

 In addition to the cage, we fabricated a lightweight tubular seat mount with integral mountng points for the anti-sub belts, that was tied-into the cage via a lower main hoop crossbar. We also added pedal spacers and lowered the steering column to accomodate Ken's new rearward seating position. We attached the steering column to the dash bar for added strength. Additional projects included a custom tubular driveshaft loop, repair of a thin, weakened portion of the driver-side floor, shoulder harness guides, and a mounting plate for the cutoff switch. We also fitted and welded full-length subframe connectors, and welded/repaired weakened sections of the torque boxes/lower control arm mounts.

This was an extensive project that resulted in a much stronger cage for Ken's racecar. Thank you, Ken!








Ken's SN95 Mustang

Ken's CMC Mustang was originally fitted with a cage from one of the popular mail-order companies. The old cage was legal, but did not fit well and was anchored to the floors, which made for a weak structure that did not provide chassis rigidity and relied on the weak, 15 year-old floors for its integrity. After seeing pictures on the Internet of a Mustang whose floor-mounted roll bar "punched-through" the floor during a rollover, Ken decided to cut-out his old cage and brought his car to Hanksville for a much more solid, structural cage.

After discussing different cage designs, Ken decided to build his new cage from 1.5" x .120" DOM tube. This is a smaller diameter than most CMC cars, which usually use 1.75" tube. However, since the target weight for Ken's car was just under 3,000 pounds, he opted to use the lighter-weight 1.5" tube and to then add extensive tube gussets to make the cage stronger. We usually use one of two structural areas for the main hoop mounts - on the rockers next to the B-pillar, or just behind the B-pillar on the rear seat riser. Ken chose to mount the main hoop on the rockers, but asked us to extend the mounting plates to the rear seat riser as well, to provide an even stronger foundation. We welded the rear brace mounting plates to the subframes and extended them to the shock towers for added strength. The forward hoops are mounted to the forward portion of the rockers, and the footwell connectors attach to the firewall and extend to the forward portion of the subframes. The additional mounting plate surface area is legal (each mounting plate is at or under 100 square inches) and adds some weight, but also adds extensive strength to the cage foundation.

We fitted the main hoop very tightly against the upper corners of the roof, and it tucks right next to the B-pillars for a great fit. The forward hoops also fit tightly to the body, contacting the roofline to give Ken the most headroom possible and contacting the length of the A-pillars to maximize forward visibility.

To triangulate the cage, we added a Petty bar to connect the main hoop to the passenger-side forward hoop plate. We also fitted a straight dash bar between the forward hoops to support the mid-section, and tied the dash bar into the footwell connector plate and the Petty bar. The cage also includes rear brace X-bars and tube gussets in the windshield bar and forward hoop areas, for further triangulation. To manage weight while also adding strength, many of the optional cage bars were made from smaller-diameter and/or thinner-wall tube.

 In addition to the cage, we fabricated a lightweight tubular seat mount with integral mountng points for the anti-sub belts, that was tied-into the cage via a lower main hoop crossbar. We also added pedal spacers and lowered the steering column to accomodate Ken's new rearward seating position. We attached the steering column to the dash bar for added strength. Additional projects included a custom tubular driveshaft loop, repair of a thin, weakened portion of the driver-side floor, shoulder harness guides, and a mounting plate for the cutoff switch. We also fitted and welded full-length subframe connectors, and welded/repaired weakened sections of the torque boxes/lower control arm mounts.

This was an extensive project that resulted in a much stronger cage for Ken's racecar. Thank you, Ken!








Ken's SN95 Mustang

Ken's CMC Mustang was originally fitted with a cage from one of the popular mail-order companies. The old cage was legal, but did not fit well and was anchored to the floors, which made for a weak structure that did not provide chassis rigidity and relied on the weak, 15 year-old floors for its integrity. After seeing pictures on the Internet of a Mustang whose floor-mounted roll bar "punched-through" the floor during a rollover, Ken decided to cut-out his old cage and brought his car to Hanksville for a much more solid, structural cage.

After discussing different cage designs, Ken decided to build his new cage from 1.5" x .120" DOM tube. This is a smaller diameter than most CMC cars, which usually use 1.75" tube. However, since the target weight for Ken's car was just under 3,000 pounds, he opted to use the lighter-weight 1.5" tube and to then add extensive tube gussets to make the cage stronger. We usually use one of two structural areas for the main hoop mounts - on the rockers next to the B-pillar, or just behind the B-pillar on the rear seat riser. Ken chose to mount the main hoop on the rockers, but asked us to extend the mounting plates to the rear seat riser as well, to provide an even stronger foundation. We welded the rear brace mounting plates to the subframes and extended them to the shock towers for added strength. The forward hoops are mounted to the forward portion of the rockers, and the footwell connectors attach to the firewall and extend to the forward portion of the subframes. The additional mounting plate surface area is legal (each mounting plate is at or under 100 square inches) and adds some weight, but also adds extensive strength to the cage foundation.

We fitted the main hoop very tightly against the upper corners of the roof, and it tucks right next to the B-pillars for a great fit. The forward hoops also fit tightly to the body, contacting the roofline to give Ken the most headroom possible and contacting the length of the A-pillars to maximize forward visibility.

To triangulate the cage, we added a Petty bar to connect the main hoop to the passenger-side forward hoop plate. We also fitted a straight dash bar between the forward hoops to support the mid-section, and tied the dash bar into the footwell connector plate and the Petty bar. The cage also includes rear brace X-bars and tube gussets in the windshield bar and forward hoop areas, for further triangulation. To manage weight while also adding strength, many of the optional cage bars were made from smaller-diameter and/or thinner-wall tube.

 In addition to the cage, we fabricated a lightweight tubular seat mount with integral mountng points for the anti-sub belts, that was tied-into the cage via a lower main hoop crossbar. We also added pedal spacers and lowered the steering column to accomodate Ken's new rearward seating position. We attached the steering column to the dash bar for added strength. Additional projects included a custom tubular driveshaft loop, repair of a thin, weakened portion of the driver-side floor, shoulder harness guides, and a mounting plate for the cutoff switch. We also fitted and welded full-length subframe connectors, and welded/repaired weakened sections of the torque boxes/lower control arm mounts.

This was an extensive project that resulted in a much stronger cage for Ken's racecar. Thank you, Ken!








Chris’ S197 Mustang

Chris wanted to build a car for the Miller Mustang Challenge, a racer series held at Miller Motorsports Park in Utah. So, he bought this brand new '08 Mustang GT, drove it around for a day, then took it home and removed the interior to begin turning it into a race car. He asked Hanksville Hot Rods to build a cage in his new car.

After building cages in Foxbodies, SN95s and New Edge Mustangs, we were impressed with the build quality of the new S197 cars. These cars are heavier than the earlier-generation Mustangs, but have more powerful engines, better suspensions and more rigid chassis.

After discussing in detail Chris' plans for the car, we decided to build the cage to Miller Mustang Challenge rules, but also to make the cage legal for other classes as well. This will make the car more versatile and will also enhance its resale value. The cage uses a 7-point design, with the standard 6 mounting points plus an optional footwell connector on the driver-side. We used 1.75"x.120" DOM tube.

We began the project by measuring and CAD programming the bends, then programmming our CNC bender. After welding the mounting plates, we fitted the main hoop, rear braces, rear brace X-bars, main hoop diagonal and harness bars. We then mocked-up the forward hoops, testing different versions before we decided on a design that maximizes driver headroom and visibility out the windshield. The windshield bar features two bends that keep it forward and up out of the driver's line of sight, and the dash bar is bent to fit close to the firewall, just under the windshield.

Because the class rules do not allow removal of the factory door intrusion beam, we formed the Extended-Style door bars to fit as far into the door area as possible while still accomodating the intrusion beam. The upper door bar touches the inside of the door skin, while the lower door bar ends just inside the intrusion beam. The vertical door bar spreaders help to strengthen the structure. Straight door bars were used on the passenger-side, and the rocker bars add more strength to the sides of the cage. After welding the cage, we installed a window net using our spring-loaded upper window net rod.

This car would be a great CMC2 competitor, and with additional engine modifications it would be competitive in AI. We look forward to seeing Chris and his new Mustang at the track this season!
 





Chris’ S197 Mustang

Chris wanted to build a car for the Miller Mustang Challenge, a racer series held at Miller Motorsports Park in Utah. So, he bought this brand new '08 Mustang GT, drove it around for a day, then took it home and removed the interior to begin turning it into a race car. He asked Hanksville Hot Rods to build a cage in his new car.

After building cages in Foxbodies, SN95s and New Edge Mustangs, we were impressed with the build quality of the new S197 cars. These cars are heavier than the earlier-generation Mustangs, but have more powerful engines, better suspensions and more rigid chassis.

After discussing in detail Chris' plans for the car, we decided to build the cage to Miller Mustang Challenge rules, but also to make the cage legal for other classes as well. This will make the car more versatile and will also enhance its resale value. The cage uses a 7-point design, with the standard 6 mounting points plus an optional footwell connector on the driver-side. We used 1.75"x.120" DOM tube.

We began the project by measuring and CAD programming the bends, then programmming our CNC bender. After welding the mounting plates, we fitted the main hoop, rear braces, rear brace X-bars, main hoop diagonal and harness bars. We then mocked-up the forward hoops, testing different versions before we decided on a design that maximizes driver headroom and visibility out the windshield. The windshield bar features two bends that keep it forward and up out of the driver's line of sight, and the dash bar is bent to fit close to the firewall, just under the windshield.

Because the class rules do not allow removal of the factory door intrusion beam, we formed the Extended-Style door bars to fit as far into the door area as possible while still accomodating the intrusion beam. The upper door bar touches the inside of the door skin, while the lower door bar ends just inside the intrusion beam. The vertical door bar spreaders help to strengthen the structure. Straight door bars were used on the passenger-side, and the rocker bars add more strength to the sides of the cage. After welding the cage, we installed a window net using our spring-loaded upper window net rod.

This car would be a great CMC2 competitor, and with additional engine modifications it would be competitive in AI. We look forward to seeing Chris and his new Mustang at the track this season!
 





Chris’ S197 Mustang

Chris wanted to build a car for the Miller Mustang Challenge, a racer series held at Miller Motorsports Park in Utah. So, he bought this brand new '08 Mustang GT, drove it around for a day, then took it home and removed the interior to begin turning it into a race car. He asked Hanksville Hot Rods to build a cage in his new car.

After building cages in Foxbodies, SN95s and New Edge Mustangs, we were impressed with the build quality of the new S197 cars. These cars are heavier than the earlier-generation Mustangs, but have more powerful engines, better suspensions and more rigid chassis.

After discussing in detail Chris' plans for the car, we decided to build the cage to Miller Mustang Challenge rules, but also to make the cage legal for other classes as well. This will make the car more versatile and will also enhance its resale value. The cage uses a 7-point design, with the standard 6 mounting points plus an optional footwell connector on the driver-side. We used 1.75"x.120" DOM tube.

We began the project by measuring and CAD programming the bends, then programmming our CNC bender. After welding the mounting plates, we fitted the main hoop, rear braces, rear brace X-bars, main hoop diagonal and harness bars. We then mocked-up the forward hoops, testing different versions before we decided on a design that maximizes driver headroom and visibility out the windshield. The windshield bar features two bends that keep it forward and up out of the driver's line of sight, and the dash bar is bent to fit close to the firewall, just under the windshield.

Because the class rules do not allow removal of the factory door intrusion beam, we formed the Extended-Style door bars to fit as far into the door area as possible while still accomodating the intrusion beam. The upper door bar touches the inside of the door skin, while the lower door bar ends just inside the intrusion beam. The vertical door bar spreaders help to strengthen the structure. Straight door bars were used on the passenger-side, and the rocker bars add more strength to the sides of the cage. After welding the cage, we installed a window net using our spring-loaded upper window net rod.

This car would be a great CMC2 competitor, and with additional engine modifications it would be competitive in AI. We look forward to seeing Chris and his new Mustang at the track this season!
 



Chris’ S197 Mustang

Chris wanted to build a car for the Miller Mustang Challenge, a racer series held at Miller Motorsports Park in Utah. So, he bought this brand new '08 Mustang GT, drove it around for a day, then took it home and removed the interior to begin turning it into a race car. He asked Hanksville Hot Rods to build a cage in his new car.

After building cages in Foxbodies, SN95s and New Edge Mustangs, we were impressed with the build quality of the new S197 cars. These cars are heavier than the earlier-generation Mustangs, but have more powerful engines, better suspensions and more rigid chassis.

After discussing in detail Chris' plans for the car, we decided to build the cage to Miller Mustang Challenge rules, but also to make the cage legal for other classes as well. This will make the car more versatile and will also enhance its resale value. The cage uses a 7-point design, with the standard 6 mounting points plus an optional footwell connector on the driver-side. We used 1.75"x.120" DOM tube.

We began the project by measuring and CAD programming the bends, then programmming our CNC bender. After welding the mounting plates, we fitted the main hoop, rear braces, rear brace X-bars, main hoop diagonal and harness bars. We then mocked-up the forward hoops, testing different versions before we decided on a design that maximizes driver headroom and visibility out the windshield. The windshield bar features two bends that keep it forward and up out of the driver's line of sight, and the dash bar is bent to fit close to the firewall, just under the windshield.

Because the class rules do not allow removal of the factory door intrusion beam, we formed the Extended-Style door bars to fit as far into the door area as possible while still accomodating the intrusion beam. The upper door bar touches the inside of the door skin, while the lower door bar ends just inside the intrusion beam. The vertical door bar spreaders help to strengthen the structure. Straight door bars were used on the passenger-side, and the rocker bars add more strength to the sides of the cage. After welding the cage, we installed a window net using our spring-loaded upper window net rod.

This car would be a great CMC2 competitor, and with additional engine modifications it would be competitive in AI. We look forward to seeing Chris and his new Mustang at the track this season!
 





Chris’ S197 Mustang

Chris wanted to build a car for the Miller Mustang Challenge, a racer series held at Miller Motorsports Park in Utah. So, he bought this brand new '08 Mustang GT, drove it around for a day, then took it home and removed the interior to begin turning it into a race car. He asked Hanksville Hot Rods to build a cage in his new car.

After building cages in Foxbodies, SN95s and New Edge Mustangs, we were impressed with the build quality of the new S197 cars. These cars are heavier than the earlier-generation Mustangs, but have more powerful engines, better suspensions and more rigid chassis.

After discussing in detail Chris' plans for the car, we decided to build the cage to Miller Mustang Challenge rules, but also to make the cage legal for other classes as well. This will make the car more versatile and will also enhance its resale value. The cage uses a 7-point design, with the standard 6 mounting points plus an optional footwell connector on the driver-side. We used 1.75"x.120" DOM tube.

We began the project by measuring and CAD programming the bends, then programmming our CNC bender. After welding the mounting plates, we fitted the main hoop, rear braces, rear brace X-bars, main hoop diagonal and harness bars. We then mocked-up the forward hoops, testing different versions before we decided on a design that maximizes driver headroom and visibility out the windshield. The windshield bar features two bends that keep it forward and up out of the driver's line of sight, and the dash bar is bent to fit close to the firewall, just under the windshield.

Because the class rules do not allow removal of the factory door intrusion beam, we formed the Extended-Style door bars to fit as far into the door area as possible while still accomodating the intrusion beam. The upper door bar touches the inside of the door skin, while the lower door bar ends just inside the intrusion beam. The vertical door bar spreaders help to strengthen the structure. Straight door bars were used on the passenger-side, and the rocker bars add more strength to the sides of the cage. After welding the cage, we installed a window net using our spring-loaded upper window net rod.

This car would be a great CMC2 competitor, and with additional engine modifications it would be competitive in AI. We look forward to seeing Chris and his new Mustang at the track this season!
 





Chris’ S197 Mustang

Chris wanted to build a car for the Miller Mustang Challenge, a racer series held at Miller Motorsports Park in Utah. So, he bought this brand new '08 Mustang GT, drove it around for a day, then took it home and removed the interior to begin turning it into a race car. He asked Hanksville Hot Rods to build a cage in his new car.

After building cages in Foxbodies, SN95s and New Edge Mustangs, we were impressed with the build quality of the new S197 cars. These cars are heavier than the earlier-generation Mustangs, but have more powerful engines, better suspensions and more rigid chassis.

After discussing in detail Chris' plans for the car, we decided to build the cage to Miller Mustang Challenge rules, but also to make the cage legal for other classes as well. This will make the car more versatile and will also enhance its resale value. The cage uses a 7-point design, with the standard 6 mounting points plus an optional footwell connector on the driver-side. We used 1.75"x.120" DOM tube.

We began the project by measuring and CAD programming the bends, then programmming our CNC bender. After welding the mounting plates, we fitted the main hoop, rear braces, rear brace X-bars, main hoop diagonal and harness bars. We then mocked-up the forward hoops, testing different versions before we decided on a design that maximizes driver headroom and visibility out the windshield. The windshield bar features two bends that keep it forward and up out of the driver's line of sight, and the dash bar is bent to fit close to the firewall, just under the windshield.

Because the class rules do not allow removal of the factory door intrusion beam, we formed the Extended-Style door bars to fit as far into the door area as possible while still accomodating the intrusion beam. The upper door bar touches the inside of the door skin, while the lower door bar ends just inside the intrusion beam. The vertical door bar spreaders help to strengthen the structure. Straight door bars were used on the passenger-side, and the rocker bars add more strength to the sides of the cage. After welding the cage, we installed a window net using our spring-loaded upper window net rod.

This car would be a great CMC2 competitor, and with additional engine modifications it would be competitive in AI. We look forward to seeing Chris and his new Mustang at the track this season!
 





Chris’ S197 Mustang

Chris wanted to build a car for the Miller Mustang Challenge, a racer series held at Miller Motorsports Park in Utah. So, he bought this brand new '08 Mustang GT, drove it around for a day, then took it home and removed the interior to begin turning it into a race car. He asked Hanksville Hot Rods to build a cage in his new car.

After building cages in Foxbodies, SN95s and New Edge Mustangs, we were impressed with the build quality of the new S197 cars. These cars are heavier than the earlier-generation Mustangs, but have more powerful engines, better suspensions and more rigid chassis.

After discussing in detail Chris' plans for the car, we decided to build the cage to Miller Mustang Challenge rules, but also to make the cage legal for other classes as well. This will make the car more versatile and will also enhance its resale value. The cage uses a 7-point design, with the standard 6 mounting points plus an optional footwell connector on the driver-side. We used 1.75"x.120" DOM tube.

We began the project by measuring and CAD programming the bends, then programmming our CNC bender. After welding the mounting plates, we fitted the main hoop, rear braces, rear brace X-bars, main hoop diagonal and harness bars. We then mocked-up the forward hoops, testing different versions before we decided on a design that maximizes driver headroom and visibility out the windshield. The windshield bar features two bends that keep it forward and up out of the driver's line of sight, and the dash bar is bent to fit close to the firewall, just under the windshield.

Because the class rules do not allow removal of the factory door intrusion beam, we formed the Extended-Style door bars to fit as far into the door area as possible while still accomodating the intrusion beam. The upper door bar touches the inside of the door skin, while the lower door bar ends just inside the intrusion beam. The vertical door bar spreaders help to strengthen the structure. Straight door bars were used on the passenger-side, and the rocker bars add more strength to the sides of the cage. After welding the cage, we installed a window net using our spring-loaded upper window net rod.

This car would be a great CMC2 competitor, and with additional engine modifications it would be competitive in AI. We look forward to seeing Chris and his new Mustang at the track this season!
 



Mike's Firebird

Mike and his family built this nice Firebird for time trial competition. While it already had a roll bar, Mike asked us to add-on to it to make a full cage that would be legal for CMC competition in the future. We custom-bent and TIG-welded 1.75" x .120" DOM tubes for the new forward hoops and windshield bar. After some discussion, Mike and his team also asked us to remove the windows and door sheetmetal, and to make our custom Extended-Style door bars to give them more elbow room while driving. These new bars fit very closely to the car, providing maximum interior space and forward visibility.

Mike's Firebird

Mike and his family built this nice Firebird for time trial competition. While it already had a roll bar, Mike asked us to add-on to it to make a full cage that would be legal for CMC competition in the future. We custom-bent and TIG-welded 1.75" x .120" DOM tubes for the new forward hoops and windshield bar. After some discussion, Mike and his team also asked us to remove the windows and door sheetmetal, and to make our custom Extended-Style door bars to give them more elbow room while driving. These new bars fit very closely to the car, providing maximum interior space and forward visibility.

Mike's Firebird

Mike and his family built this nice Firebird for time trial competition. While it already had a roll bar, Mike asked us to add-on to it to make a full cage that would be legal for CMC competition in the future. We custom-bent and TIG-welded 1.75" x .120" DOM tubes for the new forward hoops and windshield bar. After some discussion, Mike and his team also asked us to remove the windows and door sheetmetal, and to make our custom Extended-Style door bars to give them more elbow room while driving. These new bars fit very closely to the car, providing maximum interior space and forward visibility.

Mike's Firebird

Mike and his family built this nice Firebird for time trial competition. While it already had a roll bar, Mike asked us to add-on to it to make a full cage that would be legal for CMC competition in the future. We custom-bent and TIG-welded 1.75" x .120" DOM tubes for the new forward hoops and windshield bar. After some discussion, Mike and his team also asked us to remove the windows and door sheetmetal, and to make our custom Extended-Style door bars to give them more elbow room while driving. These new bars fit very closely to the car, providing maximum interior space and forward visibility.

Mike's Firebird

Mike and his family built this nice Firebird for time trial competition. While it already had a roll bar, Mike asked us to add-on to it to make a full cage that would be legal for CMC competition in the future. We custom-bent and TIG-welded 1.75" x .120" DOM tubes for the new forward hoops and windshield bar. After some discussion, Mike and his team also asked us to remove the windows and door sheetmetal, and to make our custom Extended-Style door bars to give them more elbow room while driving. These new bars fit very closely to the car, providing maximum interior space and forward visibility.

Mike's Firebird

Mike and his family built this nice Firebird for time trial competition. While it already had a roll bar, Mike asked us to add-on to it to make a full cage that would be legal for CMC competition in the future. We custom-bent and TIG-welded 1.75" x .120" DOM tubes for the new forward hoops and windshield bar. After some discussion, Mike and his team also asked us to remove the windows and door sheetmetal, and to make our custom Extended-Style door bars to give them more elbow room while driving. These new bars fit very closely to the car, providing maximum interior space and forward visibility.

Bill's Mustang Cobra


Bill's Cobra already had a cage that had been built by another shop, but he was not happy with it due to its poor fit. So, after seeing other AI/CMC cages that Hanksville has made, he cut-out the old cage and  asked us to build a new one for him. We used the same basic design that we had used for Ken's green SN95 Mustang, with a very tight-fitting main hoop that hugs the roof corners and B-pillars, as well as forward hoops that tuck-up into the corners of the roofline and windshield/A-pillars. Bill opted to keep his existing rear shock tower crossbar, and asked us to attach the rear braces and rear X-bars to the subframes behind the crossbar.

We bent the Extended-Style door bars and fitted them so that they contact the door skin, maximizing driver elbow room. The rocker bars are fitted low on the main hoop, allowing them to be welded to the mounting plates. Tube spreaders extend upward and outward from the rocker bars to the door bars, providing additional support.

Bill was concerned about making the car too light for the AI-mandated power-to-weight rules, so he asked us to build the cage using 1.75" x .120" DOM tube. Unlike Ken's car, Bill chose to not add tube gussets to the main hoop and windshield bars.
 


Bill's Mustang Cobra


Bill's Cobra already had a cage that had been built by another shop, but he was not happy with it due to its poor fit. So, after seeing other AI/CMC cages that Hanksville has made, he cut-out the old cage and  asked us to build a new one for him. We used the same basic design that we had used for Ken's green SN95 Mustang, with a very tight-fitting main hoop that hugs the roof corners and B-pillars, as well as forward hoops that tuck-up into the corners of the roofline and windshield/A-pillars. Bill opted to keep his existing rear shock tower crossbar, and asked us to attach the rear braces and rear X-bars to the subframes behind the crossbar.

We bent the Extended-Style door bars and fitted them so that they contact the door skin, maximizing driver elbow room. The rocker bars are fitted low on the main hoop, allowing them to be welded to the mounting plates. Tube spreaders extend upward and outward from the rocker bars to the door bars, providing additional support.

Bill was concerned about making the car too light for the AI-mandated power-to-weight rules, so he asked us to build the cage using 1.75" x .120" DOM tube. Unlike Ken's car, Bill chose to not add tube gussets to the main hoop and windshield bars.
 


Bill's Mustang Cobra


Bill's Cobra already had a cage that had been built by another shop, but he was not happy with it due to its poor fit. So, after seeing other AI/CMC cages that Hanksville has made, he cut-out the old cage and  asked us to build a new one for him. We used the same basic design that we had used for Ken's green SN95 Mustang, with a very tight-fitting main hoop that hugs the roof corners and B-pillars, as well as forward hoops that tuck-up into the corners of the roofline and windshield/A-pillars. Bill opted to keep his existing rear shock tower crossbar, and asked us to attach the rear braces and rear X-bars to the subframes behind the crossbar.

We bent the Extended-Style door bars and fitted them so that they contact the door skin, maximizing driver elbow room. The rocker bars are fitted low on the main hoop, allowing them to be welded to the mounting plates. Tube spreaders extend upward and outward from the rocker bars to the door bars, providing additional support.

Bill was concerned about making the car too light for the AI-mandated power-to-weight rules, so he asked us to build the cage using 1.75" x .120" DOM tube. Unlike Ken's car, Bill chose to not add tube gussets to the main hoop and windshield bars.
 


Bill's Mustang Cobra


Bill's Cobra already had a cage that had been built by another shop, but he was not happy with it due to its poor fit. So, after seeing other AI/CMC cages that Hanksville has made, he cut-out the old cage and  asked us to build a new one for him. We used the same basic design that we had used for Ken's green SN95 Mustang, with a very tight-fitting main hoop that hugs the roof corners and B-pillars, as well as forward hoops that tuck-up into the corners of the roofline and windshield/A-pillars. Bill opted to keep his existing rear shock tower crossbar, and asked us to attach the rear braces and rear X-bars to the subframes behind the crossbar.

We bent the Extended-Style door bars and fitted them so that they contact the door skin, maximizing driver elbow room. The rocker bars are fitted low on the main hoop, allowing them to be welded to the mounting plates. Tube spreaders extend upward and outward from the rocker bars to the door bars, providing additional support.

Bill was concerned about making the car too light for the AI-mandated power-to-weight rules, so he asked us to build the cage using 1.75" x .120" DOM tube. Unlike Ken's car, Bill chose to not add tube gussets to the main hoop and windshield bars.
 


Bill's Mustang Cobra


Bill's Cobra already had a cage that had been built by another shop, but he was not happy with it due to its poor fit. So, after seeing other AI/CMC cages that Hanksville has made, he cut-out the old cage and  asked us to build a new one for him. We used the same basic design that we had used for Ken's green SN95 Mustang, with a very tight-fitting main hoop that hugs the roof corners and B-pillars, as well as forward hoops that tuck-up into the corners of the roofline and windshield/A-pillars. Bill opted to keep his existing rear shock tower crossbar, and asked us to attach the rear braces and rear X-bars to the subframes behind the crossbar.

We bent the Extended-Style door bars and fitted them so that they contact the door skin, maximizing driver elbow room. The rocker bars are fitted low on the main hoop, allowing them to be welded to the mounting plates. Tube spreaders extend upward and outward from the rocker bars to the door bars, providing additional support.

Bill was concerned about making the car too light for the AI-mandated power-to-weight rules, so he asked us to build the cage using 1.75" x .120" DOM tube. Unlike Ken's car, Bill chose to not add tube gussets to the main hoop and windshield bars.
 


Bill's Mustang Cobra


Bill's Cobra already had a cage that had been built by another shop, but he was not happy with it due to its poor fit. So, after seeing other AI/CMC cages that Hanksville has made, he cut-out the old cage and  asked us to build a new one for him. We used the same basic design that we had used for Ken's green SN95 Mustang, with a very tight-fitting main hoop that hugs the roof corners and B-pillars, as well as forward hoops that tuck-up into the corners of the roofline and windshield/A-pillars. Bill opted to keep his existing rear shock tower crossbar, and asked us to attach the rear braces and rear X-bars to the subframes behind the crossbar.

We bent the Extended-Style door bars and fitted them so that they contact the door skin, maximizing driver elbow room. The rocker bars are fitted low on the main hoop, allowing them to be welded to the mounting plates. Tube spreaders extend upward and outward from the rocker bars to the door bars, providing additional support.

Bill was concerned about making the car too light for the AI-mandated power-to-weight rules, so he asked us to build the cage using 1.75" x .120" DOM tube. Unlike Ken's car, Bill chose to not add tube gussets to the main hoop and windshield bars.
 


Bill's Mustang Cobra


Bill's Cobra already had a cage that had been built by another shop, but he was not happy with it due to its poor fit. So, after seeing other AI/CMC cages that Hanksville has made, he cut-out the old cage and  asked us to build a new one for him. We used the same basic design that we had used for Ken's green SN95 Mustang, with a very tight-fitting main hoop that hugs the roof corners and B-pillars, as well as forward hoops that tuck-up into the corners of the roofline and windshield/A-pillars. Bill opted to keep his existing rear shock tower crossbar, and asked us to attach the rear braces and rear X-bars to the subframes behind the crossbar.

We bent the Extended-Style door bars and fitted them so that they contact the door skin, maximizing driver elbow room. The rocker bars are fitted low on the main hoop, allowing them to be welded to the mounting plates. Tube spreaders extend upward and outward from the rocker bars to the door bars, providing additional support.

Bill was concerned about making the car too light for the AI-mandated power-to-weight rules, so he asked us to build the cage using 1.75" x .120" DOM tube. Unlike Ken's car, Bill chose to not add tube gussets to the main hoop and windshield bars.



Bill's Mustang Cobra


Bill's Cobra already had a cage that had been built by another shop, but he was not happy with it due to its poor fit. So, after seeing other AI/CMC cages that Hanksville has made, he cut-out the old cage and  asked us to build a new one for him. We used the same basic design that we had used for Ken's green SN95 Mustang, with a very tight-fitting main hoop that hugs the roof corners and B-pillars, as well as forward hoops that tuck-up into the corners of the roofline and windshield/A-pillars. Bill opted to keep his existing rear shock tower crossbar, and asked us to attach the rear braces and rear X-bars to the subframes behind the crossbar.

We bent the Extended-Style door bars and fitted them so that they contact the door skin, maximizing driver elbow room. The rocker bars are fitted low on the main hoop, allowing them to be welded to the mounting plates. Tube spreaders extend upward and outward from the rocker bars to the door bars, providing additional support.

Bill was concerned about making the car too light for the AI-mandated power-to-weight rules, so he asked us to build the cage using 1.75" x .120" DOM tube. Unlike Ken's car, Bill chose to not add tube gussets to the main hoop and windshield bars.
 


Bill's Mustang Cobra


Bill's Cobra already had a cage that had been built by another shop, but he was not happy with it due to its poor fit. So, after seeing other AI/CMC cages that Hanksville has made, he cut-out the old cage and  asked us to build a new one for him. We used the same basic design that we had used for Ken's green SN95 Mustang, with a very tight-fitting main hoop that hugs the roof corners and B-pillars, as well as forward hoops that tuck-up into the corners of the roofline and windshield/A-pillars. Bill opted to keep his existing rear shock tower crossbar, and asked us to attach the rear braces and rear X-bars to the subframes behind the crossbar.

We bent the Extended-Style door bars and fitted them so that they contact the door skin, maximizing driver elbow room. The rocker bars are fitted low on the main hoop, allowing them to be welded to the mounting plates. Tube spreaders extend upward and outward from the rocker bars to the door bars, providing additional support.

Bill was concerned about making the car too light for the AI-mandated power-to-weight rules, so he asked us to build the cage using 1.75" x .120" DOM tube. Unlike Ken's car, Bill chose to not add tube gussets to the main hoop and windshield bars.
 


Bill's Mustang Cobra


Bill's Cobra already had a cage that had been built by another shop, but he was not happy with it due to its poor fit. So, after seeing other AI/CMC cages that Hanksville has made, he cut-out the old cage and  asked us to build a new one for him. We used the same basic design that we had used for Ken's green SN95 Mustang, with a very tight-fitting main hoop that hugs the roof corners and B-pillars, as well as forward hoops that tuck-up into the corners of the roofline and windshield/A-pillars. Bill opted to keep his existing rear shock tower crossbar, and asked us to attach the rear braces and rear X-bars to the subframes behind the crossbar.

We bent the Extended-Style door bars and fitted them so that they contact the door skin, maximizing driver elbow room. The rocker bars are fitted low on the main hoop, allowing them to be welded to the mounting plates. Tube spreaders extend upward and outward from the rocker bars to the door bars, providing additional support.

Bill was concerned about making the car too light for the AI-mandated power-to-weight rules, so he asked us to build the cage using 1.75" x .120" DOM tube. Unlike Ken's car, Bill chose to not add tube gussets to the main hoop and windshield bars.
 

Bill’s AI Camaro

After driving his C5 Corvette in HPDE and time trial events, Bill decided to go racing in American Iron. He purchased this car, which had been an SCCA racer in the Midwest. It had a bolt-in cage that had been partially welded, but Bill was uncomfortable with the way that cage fit. So, he removed the old cage and asked Hanksville Hot Rods to custom-fabricate a new cage that would better fit his driving style and seating position. We had previously fabricated roll bars for 4th-generation Camaros, but had not previously built a cage in one of these cars. So, after studying Bill's seat position in the car, we carefully measured, CAD-programmed and CNC-bent Bill's new cage.

Bill trimmed part of the interior sheetmetal from the roofline and A-pillars to allow the cage to actually fit into the body of the car, giving him quite a bit of headroom. We took advantage of this extra space by fitting the main hoop and forward hoops tightly into the roofline. We formed Extended-Style door bars on the driver-side which touch the inside of the door skin, maximizing elbow room and providing space for the driver. We added rocker bars which fit low along the pinch welds in the door openings to add strength to the cage sides.

Tieing-in the cage and body in addition to the standard 6 or 8 mounting points is legal in AI, and helps to stiffen the car. So, to further strengthen the cage and body structure, we welded the cage to the body along the A-pillars and pinch welds. After the cage was completed, we installed the window net mounts.

Bill keeps this car in great condition and has added some very neat features such as a wing and a custom differential cooler. It's always fun to watch this car at the races. Thanks for letting us help with your Camaro, Bill!
 



Bill’s AI Camaro

After driving his C5 Corvette in HPDE and time trial events, Bill decided to go racing in American Iron. He purchased this car, which had been an SCCA racer in the Midwest. It had a bolt-in cage that had been partially welded, but Bill was uncomfortable with the way that cage fit. So, he removed the old cage and asked Hanksville Hot Rods to custom-fabricate a new cage that would better fit his driving style and seating position. We had previously fabricated roll bars for 4th-generation Camaros, but had not previously built a cage in one of these cars. So, after studying Bill's seat position in the car, we carefully measured, CAD-programmed and CNC-bent Bill's new cage.

Bill trimmed part of the interior sheetmetal from the roofline and A-pillars to allow the cage to actually fit into the body of the car, giving him quite a bit of headroom. We took advantage of this extra space by fitting the main hoop and forward hoops tightly into the roofline. We formed Extended-Style door bars on the driver-side which touch the inside of the door skin, maximizing elbow room and providing space for the driver. We added rocker bars which fit low along the pinch welds in the door openings to add strength to the cage sides.

Tieing-in the cage and body in addition to the standard 6 or 8 mounting points is legal in AI, and helps to stiffen the car. So, to further strengthen the cage and body structure, we welded the cage to the body along the A-pillars and pinch welds. After the cage was completed, we installed the window net mounts.

Bill keeps this car in great condition and has added some very neat features such as a wing and a custom differential cooler. It's always fun to watch this car at the races. Thanks for letting us help with your Camaro, Bill!
 



Bill’s AI Camaro

After driving his C5 Corvette in HPDE and time trial events, Bill decided to go racing in American Iron. He purchased this car, which had been an SCCA racer in the Midwest. It had a bolt-in cage that had been partially welded, but Bill was uncomfortable with the way that cage fit. So, he removed the old cage and asked Hanksville Hot Rods to custom-fabricate a new cage that would better fit his driving style and seating position. We had previously fabricated roll bars for 4th-generation Camaros, but had not previously built a cage in one of these cars. So, after studying Bill's seat position in the car, we carefully measured, CAD-programmed and CNC-bent Bill's new cage.

Bill trimmed part of the interior sheetmetal from the roofline and A-pillars to allow the cage to actually fit into the body of the car, giving him quite a bit of headroom. We took advantage of this extra space by fitting the main hoop and forward hoops tightly into the roofline. We formed Extended-Style door bars on the driver-side which touch the inside of the door skin, maximizing elbow room and providing space for the driver. We added rocker bars which fit low along the pinch welds in the door openings to add strength to the cage sides.

Tieing-in the cage and body in addition to the standard 6 or 8 mounting points is legal in AI, and helps to stiffen the car. So, to further strengthen the cage and body structure, we welded the cage to the body along the A-pillars and pinch welds. After the cage was completed, we installed the window net mounts.

Bill keeps this car in great condition and has added some very neat features such as a wing and a custom differential cooler. It's always fun to watch this car at the races. Thanks for letting us help with your Camaro, Bill!
 

Bill’s AI Camaro

After driving his C5 Corvette in HPDE and time trial events, Bill decided to go racing in American Iron. He purchased this car, which had been an SCCA racer in the Midwest. It had a bolt-in cage that had been partially welded, but Bill was uncomfortable with the way that cage fit. So, he removed the old cage and asked Hanksville Hot Rods to custom-fabricate a new cage that would better fit his driving style and seating position. We had previously fabricated roll bars for 4th-generation Camaros, but had not previously built a cage in one of these cars. So, after studying Bill's seat position in the car, we carefully measured, CAD-programmed and CNC-bent Bill's new cage.

Bill trimmed part of the interior sheetmetal from the roofline and A-pillars to allow the cage to actually fit into the body of the car, giving him quite a bit of headroom. We took advantage of this extra space by fitting the main hoop and forward hoops tightly into the roofline. We formed Extended-Style door bars on the driver-side which touch the inside of the door skin, maximizing elbow room and providing space for the driver. We added rocker bars which fit low along the pinch welds in the door openings to add strength to the cage sides.

Tieing-in the cage and body in addition to the standard 6 or 8 mounting points is legal in AI, and helps to stiffen the car. So, to further strengthen the cage and body structure, we welded the cage to the body along the A-pillars and pinch welds. After the cage was completed, we installed the window net mounts.

Bill keeps this car in great condition and has added some very neat features such as a wing and a custom differential cooler. It's always fun to watch this car at the races. Thanks for letting us help with your Camaro, Bill!
 

Dave’s SN95 Mustang

Dave is the Regional Director of the NASA Rocky Mountain Region. He has also built a car for the Camaro-Mustang Challenge, an exciting and growing class in the region.

Dave started with a 4.6/AODE-equipped SN95 Mustang, tossed the stock engine and transmission, then completely stripped it down to allow for maximum weight reduction and to make it easier to work on as he added parts. He asked us to build a custom cage for the car.

This cage features a closely-fitted main hoop and forward hoops, NASCAR-style door bars on the driver side, and "X" style door bars on the passenger side.

As always, once we measure a car, we store the bend angle and location data to help expedite work on future cars of that style. Since our benders are programmable and our precision end-mill notcher features a location counter, we are able to store this information. Over time, as our knowledge base of cars grows, this results in a lower costs and faster turnaround times for our customers while still allowing us to custom-fit all of our cages to an individual customer’s driving position and style.

Dave’s Mustang was especially nice to work on since it was easy to move about the shop and easy to work in and around. After we finished the cage, Dave added cross-bracing to further strengthen the car.

Dave is a great supporter of Hanksville Hot Rods and we appreciated the opportunity to build this cage for him. Thanks Dave!


 



Dave’s SN95 Mustang

Dave is the Regional Director of the NASA Rocky Mountain Region. He has also built a car for the Camaro-Mustang Challenge, an exciting and growing class in the region.

Dave started with a 4.6/AODE-equipped SN95 Mustang, tossed the stock engine and transmission, then completely stripped it down to allow for maximum weight reduction and to make it easier to work on as he added parts. He asked us to build a custom cage for the car.

This cage features a closely-fitted main hoop and forward hoops, NASCAR-style door bars on the driver side, and "X" style door bars on the passenger side.

As always, once we measure a car, we store the bend angle and location data to help expedite work on future cars of that style. Since our benders are programmable and our precision end-mill notcher features a location counter, we are able to store this information. Over time, as our knowledge base of cars grows, this results in a lower costs and faster turnaround times for our customers while still allowing us to custom-fit all of our cages to an individual customer’s driving position and style.

Dave’s Mustang was especially nice to work on since it was easy to move about the shop and easy to work in and around. After we finished the cage, Dave added cross-bracing to further strengthen the car.

Dave is a great supporter of Hanksville Hot Rods and we appreciated the opportunity to build this cage for him. Thanks Dave!


 

Dave’s SN95 Mustang

Dave is the Regional Director of the NASA Rocky Mountain Region. He has also built a car for the Camaro-Mustang Challenge, an exciting and growing class in the region.

Dave started with a 4.6/AODE-equipped SN95 Mustang, tossed the stock engine and transmission, then completely stripped it down to allow for maximum weight reduction and to make it easier to work on as he added parts. He asked us to build a custom cage for the car.

This cage features a closely-fitted main hoop and forward hoops, NASCAR-style door bars on the driver side, and "X" style door bars on the passenger side.

As always, once we measure a car, we store the bend angle and location data to help expedite work on future cars of that style. Since our benders are programmable and our precision end-mill notcher features a location counter, we are able to store this information. Over time, as our knowledge base of cars grows, this results in a lower costs and faster turnaround times for our customers while still allowing us to custom-fit all of our cages to an individual customer’s driving position and style.

Dave’s Mustang was especially nice to work on since it was easy to move about the shop and easy to work in and around. After we finished the cage, Dave added cross-bracing to further strengthen the car.

Dave is a great supporter of Hanksville Hot Rods and we appreciated the opportunity to build this cage for him. Thanks Dave!


 



Scott’s AI Firebird

Scott's first season in American Iron was very successful, as he ended the season 2nd in the points championship. As he was preparing for the racing season, he asked Hanksville to build a cage for his Firebird.

For American Iron, we use a very tight-fitting cage design that allows us to tie the cage into the body with short lengths of sheetmetal, to further stiffen the unibody structure. Like most of our road-race cages, we used Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door, even further than most "Nascar-style" bars that other builders use. We fitted "X"-style door bars on the passenger-side. We installed rocker bars in each door opening to stiffen the lower portion of the unibody. Also like all of our road-race cages, we fitted the windshield bar high and forward, at the top of the windshield opening, to maximize the driver's forward vision. Since this is a T-top car, we also added an extra bar that ties the main hoop to the windshield bar for additional rollover protection.

 
Scott’s AI Firebird

Scott's first season in American Iron was very successful, as he ended the season 2nd in the points championship. As he was preparing for the racing season, he asked Hanksville to build a cage for his Firebird.

For American Iron, we use a very tight-fitting cage design that allows us to tie the cage into the body with short lengths of sheetmetal, to further stiffen the unibody structure. Like most of our road-race cages, we used Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door, even further than most "Nascar-style" bars that other builders use. We fitted "X"-style door bars on the passenger-side. We installed rocker bars in each door opening to stiffen the lower portion of the unibody. Also like all of our road-race cages, we fitted the windshield bar high and forward, at the top of the windshield opening, to maximize the driver's forward vision. Since this is a T-top car, we also added an extra bar that ties the main hoop to the windshield bar for additional rollover protection.

 
Scott’s AI Firebird

Scott's first season in American Iron was very successful, as he ended the season 2nd in the points championship. As he was preparing for the racing season, he asked Hanksville to build a cage for his Firebird.

For American Iron, we use a very tight-fitting cage design that allows us to tie the cage into the body with short lengths of sheetmetal, to further stiffen the unibody structure. Like most of our road-race cages, we used Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door, even further than most "Nascar-style" bars that other builders use. We fitted "X"-style door bars on the passenger-side. We installed rocker bars in each door opening to stiffen the lower portion of the unibody. Also like all of our road-race cages, we fitted the windshield bar high and forward, at the top of the windshield opening, to maximize the driver's forward vision. Since this is a T-top car, we also added an extra bar that ties the main hoop to the windshield bar for additional rollover protection.

 
Scott’s AI Firebird

Scott's first season in American Iron was very successful, as he ended the season 2nd in the points championship. As he was preparing for the racing season, he asked Hanksville to build a cage for his Firebird.

For American Iron, we use a very tight-fitting cage design that allows us to tie the cage into the body with short lengths of sheetmetal, to further stiffen the unibody structure. Like most of our road-race cages, we used Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door, even further than most "Nascar-style" bars that other builders use. We fitted "X"-style door bars on the passenger-side. We installed rocker bars in each door opening to stiffen the lower portion of the unibody. Also like all of our road-race cages, we fitted the windshield bar high and forward, at the top of the windshield opening, to maximize the driver's forward vision. Since this is a T-top car, we also added an extra bar that ties the main hoop to the windshield bar for additional rollover protection.

 
Scott’s AI Firebird

Scott's first season in American Iron was very successful, as he ended the season 2nd in the points championship. As he was preparing for the racing season, he asked Hanksville to build a cage for his Firebird.

For American Iron, we use a very tight-fitting cage design that allows us to tie the cage into the body with short lengths of sheetmetal, to further stiffen the unibody structure. Like most of our road-race cages, we used Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door, even further than most "Nascar-style" bars that other builders use. We fitted "X"-style door bars on the passenger-side. We installed rocker bars in each door opening to stiffen the lower portion of the unibody. Also like all of our road-race cages, we fitted the windshield bar high and forward, at the top of the windshield opening, to maximize the driver's forward vision. Since this is a T-top car, we also added an extra bar that ties the main hoop to the windshield bar for additional rollover protection.

 
Scott’s AI Firebird

Scott's first season in American Iron was very successful, as he ended the season 2nd in the points championship. As he was preparing for the racing season, he asked Hanksville to build a cage for his Firebird.

For American Iron, we use a very tight-fitting cage design that allows us to tie the cage into the body with short lengths of sheetmetal, to further stiffen the unibody structure. Like most of our road-race cages, we used Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door, even further than most "Nascar-style" bars that other builders use. We fitted "X"-style door bars on the passenger-side. We installed rocker bars in each door opening to stiffen the lower portion of the unibody. Also like all of our road-race cages, we fitted the windshield bar high and forward, at the top of the windshield opening, to maximize the driver's forward vision. Since this is a T-top car, we also added an extra bar that ties the main hoop to the windshield bar for additional rollover protection.

 
Scott’s AI Firebird

Scott's first season in American Iron was very successful, as he ended the season 2nd in the points championship. As he was preparing for the racing season, he asked Hanksville to build a cage for his Firebird.

For American Iron, we use a very tight-fitting cage design that allows us to tie the cage into the body with short lengths of sheetmetal, to further stiffen the unibody structure. Like most of our road-race cages, we used Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door, even further than most "Nascar-style" bars that other builders use. We fitted "X"-style door bars on the passenger-side. We installed rocker bars in each door opening to stiffen the lower portion of the unibody. Also like all of our road-race cages, we fitted the windshield bar high and forward, at the top of the windshield opening, to maximize the driver's forward vision. Since this is a T-top car, we also added an extra bar that ties the main hoop to the windshield bar for additional rollover protection.

 
Scott’s AI Firebird

Scott's first season in American Iron was very successful, as he ended the season 2nd in the points championship. As he was preparing for the racing season, he asked Hanksville to build a cage for his Firebird.

For American Iron, we use a very tight-fitting cage design that allows us to tie the cage into the body with short lengths of sheetmetal, to further stiffen the unibody structure. Like most of our road-race cages, we used Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door, even further than most "Nascar-style" bars that other builders use. We fitted "X"-style door bars on the passenger-side. We installed rocker bars in each door opening to stiffen the lower portion of the unibody. Also like all of our road-race cages, we fitted the windshield bar high and forward, at the top of the windshield opening, to maximize the driver's forward vision. Since this is a T-top car, we also added an extra bar that ties the main hoop to the windshield bar for additional rollover protection.

 
Scott’s AI Firebird

Scott's first season in American Iron was very successful, as he ended the season 2nd in the points championship. As he was preparing for the racing season, he asked Hanksville to build a cage for his Firebird.

For American Iron, we use a very tight-fitting cage design that allows us to tie the cage into the body with short lengths of sheetmetal, to further stiffen the unibody structure. Like most of our road-race cages, we used Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door, even further than most "Nascar-style" bars that other builders use. We fitted "X"-style door bars on the passenger-side. We installed rocker bars in each door opening to stiffen the lower portion of the unibody. Also like all of our road-race cages, we fitted the windshield bar high and forward, at the top of the windshield opening, to maximize the driver's forward vision. Since this is a T-top car, we also added an extra bar that ties the main hoop to the windshield bar for additional rollover protection.

 
Scott’s AI Firebird

Scott's first season in American Iron was very successful, as he ended the season 2nd in the points championship. As he was preparing for the racing season, he asked Hanksville to build a cage for his Firebird.

For American Iron, we use a very tight-fitting cage design that allows us to tie the cage into the body with short lengths of sheetmetal, to further stiffen the unibody structure. Like most of our road-race cages, we used Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door, even further than most "Nascar-style" bars that other builders use. We fitted "X"-style door bars on the passenger-side. We installed rocker bars in each door opening to stiffen the lower portion of the unibody. Also like all of our road-race cages, we fitted the windshield bar high and forward, at the top of the windshield opening, to maximize the driver's forward vision. Since this is a T-top car, we also added an extra bar that ties the main hoop to the windshield bar for additional rollover protection.

 

Rich’s Foxbody Mustang

We previously built a cage for a BMW Spec E30 car that Rich planned to race, but after using that car for a number of HPDE events and comp school, Rich missed the thunder of V8s and decided to build and race his Foxbody in CMC.

Like most of our road race cages, we used our Extended-Style door bars on Rich's car. These bars extend fully into the driver-side doors to give Rich as much space as possible. Rich chose X-style door bars on the passenger-side. We used rocker bars on both sides to strengthen the door bars.



Rich’s Foxbody Mustang

We previously built a cage for a BMW Spec E30 car that Rich planned to race, but after using that car for a number of HPDE events and comp school, Rich missed the thunder of V8s and decided to build and race his Foxbody in CMC.

Like most of our road race cages, we used our Extended-Style door bars on Rich's car. These bars extend fully into the driver-side doors to give Rich as much space as possible. Rich chose X-style door bars on the passenger-side. We used rocker bars on both sides to strengthen the door bars.



Rich’s Foxbody Mustang

We previously built a cage for a BMW Spec E30 car that Rich planned to race, but after using that car for a number of HPDE events and comp school, Rich missed the thunder of V8s and decided to build and race his Foxbody in CMC.

Like most of our road race cages, we used our Extended-Style door bars on Rich's car. These bars extend fully into the driver-side doors to give Rich as much space as possible. Rich chose X-style door bars on the passenger-side. We used rocker bars on both sides to strengthen the door bars.



Rich’s Foxbody Mustang

We previously built a cage for a BMW Spec E30 car that Rich planned to race, but after using that car for a number of HPDE events and comp school, Rich missed the thunder of V8s and decided to build and race his Foxbody in CMC.

Like most of our road race cages, we used our Extended-Style door bars on Rich's car. These bars extend fully into the driver-side doors to give Rich as much space as possible. Rich chose X-style door bars on the passenger-side. We used rocker bars on both sides to strengthen the door bars.



Rich’s Foxbody Mustang

We previously built a cage for a BMW Spec E30 car that Rich planned to race, but after using that car for a number of HPDE events and comp school, Rich missed the thunder of V8s and decided to build and race his Foxbody in CMC.

Like most of our road race cages, we used our Extended-Style door bars on Rich's car. These bars extend fully into the driver-side doors to give Rich as much space as possible. Rich chose X-style door bars on the passenger-side. We used rocker bars on both sides to strengthen the door bars.



Rich’s Foxbody Mustang

We previously built a cage for a BMW Spec E30 car that Rich planned to race, but after using that car for a number of HPDE events and comp school, Rich missed the thunder of V8s and decided to build and race his Foxbody in CMC.

Like most of our road race cages, we used our Extended-Style door bars on Rich's car. These bars extend fully into the driver-side doors to give Rich as much space as possible. Rich chose X-style door bars on the passenger-side. We used rocker bars on both sides to strengthen the door bars.



Rich’s Foxbody Mustang

We previously built a cage for a BMW Spec E30 car that Rich planned to race, but after using that car for a number of HPDE events and comp school, Rich missed the thunder of V8s and decided to build and race his Foxbody in CMC.

Like most of our road race cages, we used our Extended-Style door bars on Rich's car. These bars extend fully into the driver-side doors to give Rich as much space as possible. Rich chose X-style door bars on the passenger-side. We used rocker bars on both sides to strengthen the door bars.



Kyle’s CMC Camaro

Kyle asked us to fabricate and install a custom-fitted roll cage for his Camaro. Whenever we build a roll cage, we always discuss the customer’s needs and ensure that they are not only getting a competition-legal cage, but also one that suits their driving style and preferences. For example, while many customers prefer to strip their doors and ask us to install NASCAR-style door bars, Kyle chose to retain his windows. So, we installed door bars that fit close to the doors, giving him maximum elbow room while retaining the stock door panels.

This cage fits much better than any of the mail-order cages, was custom-built to Kyle’s needs, and was priced very competitively.

 
Kyle’s CMC Camaro

Kyle asked us to fabricate and install a custom-fitted roll cage for his Camaro. Whenever we build a roll cage, we always discuss the customer’s needs and ensure that they are not only getting a competition-legal cage, but also one that suits their driving style and preferences. For example, while many customers prefer to strip their doors and ask us to install NASCAR-style door bars, Kyle chose to retain his windows. So, we installed door bars that fit close to the doors, giving him maximum elbow room while retaining the stock door panels.

This cage fits much better than any of the mail-order cages, was custom-built to Kyle’s needs, and was priced very competitively.

 
Kyle’s CMC Camaro

Kyle asked us to fabricate and install a custom-fitted roll cage for his Camaro. Whenever we build a roll cage, we always discuss the customer’s needs and ensure that they are not only getting a competition-legal cage, but also one that suits their driving style and preferences. For example, while many customers prefer to strip their doors and ask us to install NASCAR-style door bars, Kyle chose to retain his windows. So, we installed door bars that fit close to the doors, giving him maximum elbow room while retaining the stock door panels.

This cage fits much better than any of the mail-order cages, was custom-built to Kyle’s needs, and was priced very competitively.

 
Kyle’s CMC Camaro

Kyle asked us to fabricate and install a custom-fitted roll cage for his Camaro. Whenever we build a roll cage, we always discuss the customer’s needs and ensure that they are not only getting a competition-legal cage, but also one that suits their driving style and preferences. For example, while many customers prefer to strip their doors and ask us to install NASCAR-style door bars, Kyle chose to retain his windows. So, we installed door bars that fit close to the doors, giving him maximum elbow room while retaining the stock door panels.

This cage fits much better than any of the mail-order cages, was custom-built to Kyle’s needs, and was priced very competitively.

 
Kyle’s CMC Camaro

Kyle asked us to fabricate and install a custom-fitted roll cage for his Camaro. Whenever we build a roll cage, we always discuss the customer’s needs and ensure that they are not only getting a competition-legal cage, but also one that suits their driving style and preferences. For example, while many customers prefer to strip their doors and ask us to install NASCAR-style door bars, Kyle chose to retain his windows. So, we installed door bars that fit close to the doors, giving him maximum elbow room while retaining the stock door panels.

This cage fits much better than any of the mail-order cages, was custom-built to Kyle’s needs, and was priced very competitively.

 

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