Projects  >  Roll Bar & Cage Projects  >  Domestic Drag Car Projects
Drag Car Roll Bar & Cage Projects:

Here are some examples of custom-fitted roll bars and cages that we have fabricated for drag race customers. All of our drag race cages are built to NHRA requirements using your choice of DOM mild steel or TIG-welded chrom-moly. Our cages fit great, and are custom-designed for each racer's driving position. Tubes are designed and positioned to maximize chassis rigidity and stability under hard launches and at speed. As an added service, we offer in-shop certification of drag chassis and cages by the regional NHRA chassis inspector.

John’s '71 Nova

John already had a cage in his Nova, but he wanted to step-up the power and was concerned that his existing cage might not be strong enough. So, he asked the Hanksville team to remove his old cage and to fabricate a new, custom-fitted TIG-welded chrom-moly cage for him. After the old cage was removed, we fabricated new floor mounting plates on the rocker panels to provide a strong foundation for the new cage. We then custom-mandrel-bent the new bars, which included a tight-fitting main hoop and forward hoops that are specially designed to give the driver as much headroom as possible.

In addition to the straight rear braces (which feature a crossbar for added strength), we fitted X-bars in the rear area that attach to the rear subframes, to help stiffen the back-half. Rocker bars add stability to the center of the car, and front framerail connectors strengthen the front end.

The cage was inspected before the car left Hanksville, and is certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile. After the cage was completed, we added seat-back braces to comply with NHRA rules, installed the window net and painted the cage flat black. We also fabricated a new aluminum rear bulkhead and reinforced seat mounts. Under the car, we added a ladder bar crossmember and strengthened the joints between the subframe connectors and rear framerails.

 


John’s '71 Nova

John already had a cage in his Nova, but he wanted to step-up the power and was concerned that his existing cage might not be strong enough. So, he asked the Hanksville team to remove his old cage and to fabricate a new, custom-fitted TIG-welded chrom-moly cage for him. After the old cage was removed, we fabricated new floor mounting plates on the rocker panels to provide a strong foundation for the new cage. We then custom-mandrel-bent the new bars, which included a tight-fitting main hoop and forward hoops that are specially designed to give the driver as much headroom as possible.

In addition to the straight rear braces (which feature a crossbar for added strength), we fitted X-bars in the rear area that attach to the rear subframes, to help stiffen the back-half. Rocker bars add stability to the center of the car, and front framerail connectors strengthen the front end.

The cage was inspected before the car left Hanksville, and is certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile. After the cage was completed, we added seat-back braces to comply with NHRA rules, installed the window net and painted the cage flat black. We also fabricated a new aluminum rear bulkhead and reinforced seat mounts. Under the car, we added a ladder bar crossmember and strengthened the joints between the subframe connectors and rear framerails.

 


John’s '71 Nova

John already had a cage in his Nova, but he wanted to step-up the power and was concerned that his existing cage might not be strong enough. So, he asked the Hanksville team to remove his old cage and to fabricate a new, custom-fitted TIG-welded chrom-moly cage for him. After the old cage was removed, we fabricated new floor mounting plates on the rocker panels to provide a strong foundation for the new cage. We then custom-mandrel-bent the new bars, which included a tight-fitting main hoop and forward hoops that are specially designed to give the driver as much headroom as possible.

In addition to the straight rear braces (which feature a crossbar for added strength), we fitted X-bars in the rear area that attach to the rear subframes, to help stiffen the back-half. Rocker bars add stability to the center of the car, and front framerail connectors strengthen the front end.

The cage was inspected before the car left Hanksville, and is certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile. After the cage was completed, we added seat-back braces to comply with NHRA rules, installed the window net and painted the cage flat black. We also fabricated a new aluminum rear bulkhead and reinforced seat mounts. Under the car, we added a ladder bar crossmember and strengthened the joints between the subframe connectors and rear framerails.

 


John’s '71 Nova

John already had a cage in his Nova, but he wanted to step-up the power and was concerned that his existing cage might not be strong enough. So, he asked the Hanksville team to remove his old cage and to fabricate a new, custom-fitted TIG-welded chrom-moly cage for him. After the old cage was removed, we fabricated new floor mounting plates on the rocker panels to provide a strong foundation for the new cage. We then custom-mandrel-bent the new bars, which included a tight-fitting main hoop and forward hoops that are specially designed to give the driver as much headroom as possible.

In addition to the straight rear braces (which feature a crossbar for added strength), we fitted X-bars in the rear area that attach to the rear subframes, to help stiffen the back-half. Rocker bars add stability to the center of the car, and front framerail connectors strengthen the front end.

The cage was inspected before the car left Hanksville, and is certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile. After the cage was completed, we added seat-back braces to comply with NHRA rules, installed the window net and painted the cage flat black. We also fabricated a new aluminum rear bulkhead and reinforced seat mounts. Under the car, we added a ladder bar crossmember and strengthened the joints between the subframe connectors and rear framerails.

 


John’s '71 Nova

John already had a cage in his Nova, but he wanted to step-up the power and was concerned that his existing cage might not be strong enough. So, he asked the Hanksville team to remove his old cage and to fabricate a new, custom-fitted TIG-welded chrom-moly cage for him. After the old cage was removed, we fabricated new floor mounting plates on the rocker panels to provide a strong foundation for the new cage. We then custom-mandrel-bent the new bars, which included a tight-fitting main hoop and forward hoops that are specially designed to give the driver as much headroom as possible.

In addition to the straight rear braces (which feature a crossbar for added strength), we fitted X-bars in the rear area that attach to the rear subframes, to help stiffen the back-half. Rocker bars add stability to the center of the car, and front framerail connectors strengthen the front end.

The cage was inspected before the car left Hanksville, and is certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile. After the cage was completed, we added seat-back braces to comply with NHRA rules, installed the window net and painted the cage flat black. We also fabricated a new aluminum rear bulkhead and reinforced seat mounts. Under the car, we added a ladder bar crossmember and strengthened the joints between the subframe connectors and rear framerails.

 


John’s '71 Nova

John already had a cage in his Nova, but he wanted to step-up the power and was concerned that his existing cage might not be strong enough. So, he asked the Hanksville team to remove his old cage and to fabricate a new, custom-fitted TIG-welded chrom-moly cage for him. After the old cage was removed, we fabricated new floor mounting plates on the rocker panels to provide a strong foundation for the new cage. We then custom-mandrel-bent the new bars, which included a tight-fitting main hoop and forward hoops that are specially designed to give the driver as much headroom as possible.

In addition to the straight rear braces (which feature a crossbar for added strength), we fitted X-bars in the rear area that attach to the rear subframes, to help stiffen the back-half. Rocker bars add stability to the center of the car, and front framerail connectors strengthen the front end.

The cage was inspected before the car left Hanksville, and is certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile. After the cage was completed, we added seat-back braces to comply with NHRA rules, installed the window net and painted the cage flat black. We also fabricated a new aluminum rear bulkhead and reinforced seat mounts. Under the car, we added a ladder bar crossmember and strengthened the joints between the subframe connectors and rear framerails.

 


John’s '71 Nova

John already had a cage in his Nova, but he wanted to step-up the power and was concerned that his existing cage might not be strong enough. So, he asked the Hanksville team to remove his old cage and to fabricate a new, custom-fitted TIG-welded chrom-moly cage for him. After the old cage was removed, we fabricated new floor mounting plates on the rocker panels to provide a strong foundation for the new cage. We then custom-mandrel-bent the new bars, which included a tight-fitting main hoop and forward hoops that are specially designed to give the driver as much headroom as possible.

In addition to the straight rear braces (which feature a crossbar for added strength), we fitted X-bars in the rear area that attach to the rear subframes, to help stiffen the back-half. Rocker bars add stability to the center of the car, and front framerail connectors strengthen the front end.

The cage was inspected before the car left Hanksville, and is certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile. After the cage was completed, we added seat-back braces to comply with NHRA rules, installed the window net and painted the cage flat black. We also fabricated a new aluminum rear bulkhead and reinforced seat mounts. Under the car, we added a ladder bar crossmember and strengthened the joints between the subframe connectors and rear framerails.

 


John’s '71 Nova

John already had a cage in his Nova, but he wanted to step-up the power and was concerned that his existing cage might not be strong enough. So, he asked the Hanksville team to remove his old cage and to fabricate a new, custom-fitted TIG-welded chrom-moly cage for him. After the old cage was removed, we fabricated new floor mounting plates on the rocker panels to provide a strong foundation for the new cage. We then custom-mandrel-bent the new bars, which included a tight-fitting main hoop and forward hoops that are specially designed to give the driver as much headroom as possible.

In addition to the straight rear braces (which feature a crossbar for added strength), we fitted X-bars in the rear area that attach to the rear subframes, to help stiffen the back-half. Rocker bars add stability to the center of the car, and front framerail connectors strengthen the front end.

The cage was inspected before the car left Hanksville, and is certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile. After the cage was completed, we added seat-back braces to comply with NHRA rules, installed the window net and painted the cage flat black. We also fabricated a new aluminum rear bulkhead and reinforced seat mounts. Under the car, we added a ladder bar crossmember and strengthened the joints between the subframe connectors and rear framerails.

 


John’s '71 Nova

John already had a cage in his Nova, but he wanted to step-up the power and was concerned that his existing cage might not be strong enough. So, he asked the Hanksville team to remove his old cage and to fabricate a new, custom-fitted TIG-welded chrom-moly cage for him. After the old cage was removed, we fabricated new floor mounting plates on the rocker panels to provide a strong foundation for the new cage. We then custom-mandrel-bent the new bars, which included a tight-fitting main hoop and forward hoops that are specially designed to give the driver as much headroom as possible.

In addition to the straight rear braces (which feature a crossbar for added strength), we fitted X-bars in the rear area that attach to the rear subframes, to help stiffen the back-half. Rocker bars add stability to the center of the car, and front framerail connectors strengthen the front end.

The cage was inspected before the car left Hanksville, and is certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile. After the cage was completed, we added seat-back braces to comply with NHRA rules, installed the window net and painted the cage flat black. We also fabricated a new aluminum rear bulkhead and reinforced seat mounts. Under the car, we added a ladder bar crossmember and strengthened the joints between the subframe connectors and rear framerails.

 


John’s '71 Nova

John already had a cage in his Nova, but he wanted to step-up the power and was concerned that his existing cage might not be strong enough. So, he asked the Hanksville team to remove his old cage and to fabricate a new, custom-fitted TIG-welded chrom-moly cage for him. After the old cage was removed, we fabricated new floor mounting plates on the rocker panels to provide a strong foundation for the new cage. We then custom-mandrel-bent the new bars, which included a tight-fitting main hoop and forward hoops that are specially designed to give the driver as much headroom as possible.

In addition to the straight rear braces (which feature a crossbar for added strength), we fitted X-bars in the rear area that attach to the rear subframes, to help stiffen the back-half. Rocker bars add stability to the center of the car, and front framerail connectors strengthen the front end.

The cage was inspected before the car left Hanksville, and is certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile. After the cage was completed, we added seat-back braces to comply with NHRA rules, installed the window net and painted the cage flat black. We also fabricated a new aluminum rear bulkhead and reinforced seat mounts. Under the car, we added a ladder bar crossmember and strengthened the joints between the subframe connectors and rear framerails.

 


Ed’s '62 Belair

Ed has built a big cubic-inch, stroked 409 for his '62 Belair. In a hurry to complete the car, he made the mistake of buying a pre-bent cage from a big mail-order place. However, his mail-order cage had kinked bends and didn't fit his car. So, he brought his nice Belair to Hanksville for a great-fitting custom cage. Because he did not consider weight to be a concern for his big car, Ed chose to use DOM mild steel which was MIG welded to save him cost.

Since the '62 Belair's frame uses an X-design, we first trimmed the floor so that we could add rectangular tube rails to connect the inside of the X-frame to the car's rocker panels where the main hoop and forward hoops are mounted. We also trimmed the rear sheetmetal to allow us to add X-braces in the rear area of the cage, to help stiffen the chassis. As with all of Hanksville's cages, Ed's cage was designed to maximize driver headroom around the forward hoops and visibility through the windshield. This design philosophy takes more patience and care to fabricate, but provides the driver with as much room as possible, maximizing driver comfort.

We added swing-out door bars to allow Ed to get into and out of the car easily, and we also extended bars from the forward hoops to the front framerails to stiffen the front end. We finished the project by installing a window net kit and adding Magnaflow mufflers to help make Ed's car somewhat streetable. This cage was inspected at Hanksville's shop and certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile.

 


Ed’s '62 Belair

Ed has built a big cubic-inch, stroked 409 for his '62 Belair. In a hurry to complete the car, he made the mistake of buying a pre-bent cage from a big mail-order place. However, his mail-order cage had kinked bends and didn't fit his car. So, he brought his nice Belair to Hanksville for a great-fitting custom cage. Because he did not consider weight to be a concern for his big car, Ed chose to use DOM mild steel which was MIG welded to save him cost.

Since the '62 Belair's frame uses an X-design, we first trimmed the floor so that we could add rectangular tube rails to connect the inside of the X-frame to the car's rocker panels where the main hoop and forward hoops are mounted. We also trimmed the rear sheetmetal to allow us to add X-braces in the rear area of the cage, to help stiffen the chassis. As with all of Hanksville's cages, Ed's cage was designed to maximize driver headroom around the forward hoops and visibility through the windshield. This design philosophy takes more patience and care to fabricate, but provides the driver with as much room as possible, maximizing driver comfort.

We added swing-out door bars to allow Ed to get into and out of the car easily, and we also extended bars from the forward hoops to the front framerails to stiffen the front end. We finished the project by installing a window net kit and adding Magnaflow mufflers to help make Ed's car somewhat streetable. This cage was inspected at Hanksville's shop and certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile.
 


Ed’s '62 Belair

Ed has built a big cubic-inch, stroked 409 for his '62 Belair. In a hurry to complete the car, he made the mistake of buying a pre-bent cage from a big mail-order place. However, his mail-order cage had kinked bends and didn't fit his car. So, he brought his nice Belair to Hanksville for a great-fitting custom cage. Because he did not consider weight to be a concern for his big car, Ed chose to use DOM mild steel which was MIG welded to save him cost.

Since the '62 Belair's frame uses an X-design, we first trimmed the floor so that we could add rectangular tube rails to connect the inside of the X-frame to the car's rocker panels where the main hoop and forward hoops are mounted. We also trimmed the rear sheetmetal to allow us to add X-braces in the rear area of the cage, to help stiffen the chassis. As with all of Hanksville's cages, Ed's cage was designed to maximize driver headroom around the forward hoops and visibility through the windshield. This design philosophy takes more patience and care to fabricate, but provides the driver with as much room as possible, maximizing driver comfort.

We added swing-out door bars to allow Ed to get into and out of the car easily, and we also extended bars from the forward hoops to the front framerails to stiffen the front end. We finished the project by installing a window net kit and adding Magnaflow mufflers to help make Ed's car somewhat streetable. This cage was inspected at Hanksville's shop and certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile.
 


Ed’s '62 Belair

Ed has built a big cubic-inch, stroked 409 for his '62 Belair. In a hurry to complete the car, he made the mistake of buying a pre-bent cage from a big mail-order place. However, his mail-order cage had kinked bends and didn't fit his car. So, he brought his nice Belair to Hanksville for a great-fitting custom cage. Because he did not consider weight to be a concern for his big car, Ed chose to use DOM mild steel which was MIG welded to save him cost.

Since the '62 Belair's frame uses an X-design, we first trimmed the floor so that we could add rectangular tube rails to connect the inside of the X-frame to the car's rocker panels where the main hoop and forward hoops are mounted. We also trimmed the rear sheetmetal to allow us to add X-braces in the rear area of the cage, to help stiffen the chassis. As with all of Hanksville's cages, Ed's cage was designed to maximize driver headroom around the forward hoops and visibility through the windshield. This design philosophy takes more patience and care to fabricate, but provides the driver with as much room as possible, maximizing driver comfort.

We added swing-out door bars to allow Ed to get into and out of the car easily, and we also extended bars from the forward hoops to the front framerails to stiffen the front end. We finished the project by installing a window net kit and adding Magnaflow mufflers to help make Ed's car somewhat streetable. This cage was inspected at Hanksville's shop and certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile.
 


Ed’s '62 Belair

Ed has built a big cubic-inch, stroked 409 for his '62 Belair. In a hurry to complete the car, he made the mistake of buying a pre-bent cage from a big mail-order place. However, his mail-order cage had kinked bends and didn't fit his car. So, he brought his nice Belair to Hanksville for a great-fitting custom cage. Because he did not consider weight to be a concern for his big car, Ed chose to use DOM mild steel which was MIG welded to save him cost.

Since the '62 Belair's frame uses an X-design, we first trimmed the floor so that we could add rectangular tube rails to connect the inside of the X-frame to the car's rocker panels where the main hoop and forward hoops are mounted. We also trimmed the rear sheetmetal to allow us to add X-braces in the rear area of the cage, to help stiffen the chassis. As with all of Hanksville's cages, Ed's cage was designed to maximize driver headroom around the forward hoops and visibility through the windshield. This design philosophy takes more patience and care to fabricate, but provides the driver with as much room as possible, maximizing driver comfort.

We added swing-out door bars to allow Ed to get into and out of the car easily, and we also extended bars from the forward hoops to the front framerails to stiffen the front end. We finished the project by installing a window net kit and adding Magnaflow mufflers to help make Ed's car somewhat streetable. This cage was inspected at Hanksville's shop and certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile.
 


Ed’s '62 Belair

Ed has built a big cubic-inch, stroked 409 for his '62 Belair. In a hurry to complete the car, he made the mistake of buying a pre-bent cage from a big mail-order place. However, his mail-order cage had kinked bends and didn't fit his car. So, he brought his nice Belair to Hanksville for a great-fitting custom cage. Because he did not consider weight to be a concern for his big car, Ed chose to use DOM mild steel which was MIG welded to save him cost.

Since the '62 Belair's frame uses an X-design, we first trimmed the floor so that we could add rectangular tube rails to connect the inside of the X-frame to the car's rocker panels where the main hoop and forward hoops are mounted. We also trimmed the rear sheetmetal to allow us to add X-braces in the rear area of the cage, to help stiffen the chassis. As with all of Hanksville's cages, Ed's cage was designed to maximize driver headroom around the forward hoops and visibility through the windshield. This design philosophy takes more patience and care to fabricate, but provides the driver with as much room as possible, maximizing driver comfort.

We added swing-out door bars to allow Ed to get into and out of the car easily, and we also extended bars from the forward hoops to the front framerails to stiffen the front end. We finished the project by installing a window net kit and adding Magnaflow mufflers to help make Ed's car somewhat streetable. This cage was inspected at Hanksville's shop and certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile.
 


Ed’s '62 Belair

Ed has built a big cubic-inch, stroked 409 for his '62 Belair. In a hurry to complete the car, he made the mistake of buying a pre-bent cage from a big mail-order place. However, his mail-order cage had kinked bends and didn't fit his car. So, he brought his nice Belair to Hanksville for a great-fitting custom cage. Because he did not consider weight to be a concern for his big car, Ed chose to use DOM mild steel which was MIG welded to save him cost.

Since the '62 Belair's frame uses an X-design, we first trimmed the floor so that we could add rectangular tube rails to connect the inside of the X-frame to the car's rocker panels where the main hoop and forward hoops are mounted. We also trimmed the rear sheetmetal to allow us to add X-braces in the rear area of the cage, to help stiffen the chassis. As with all of Hanksville's cages, Ed's cage was designed to maximize driver headroom around the forward hoops and visibility through the windshield. This design philosophy takes more patience and care to fabricate, but provides the driver with as much room as possible, maximizing driver comfort.

We added swing-out door bars to allow Ed to get into and out of the car easily, and we also extended bars from the forward hoops to the front framerails to stiffen the front end. We finished the project by installing a window net kit and adding Magnaflow mufflers to help make Ed's car somewhat streetable. This cage was inspected at Hanksville's shop and certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile.
 


Ed’s '62 Belair

Ed has built a big cubic-inch, stroked 409 for his '62 Belair. In a hurry to complete the car, he made the mistake of buying a pre-bent cage from a big mail-order place. However, his mail-order cage had kinked bends and didn't fit his car. So, he brought his nice Belair to Hanksville for a great-fitting custom cage. Because he did not consider weight to be a concern for his big car, Ed chose to use DOM mild steel which was MIG welded to save him cost.

Since the '62 Belair's frame uses an X-design, we first trimmed the floor so that we could add rectangular tube rails to connect the inside of the X-frame to the car's rocker panels where the main hoop and forward hoops are mounted. We also trimmed the rear sheetmetal to allow us to add X-braces in the rear area of the cage, to help stiffen the chassis. As with all of Hanksville's cages, Ed's cage was designed to maximize driver headroom around the forward hoops and visibility through the windshield. This design philosophy takes more patience and care to fabricate, but provides the driver with as much room as possible, maximizing driver comfort.

We added swing-out door bars to allow Ed to get into and out of the car easily, and we also extended bars from the forward hoops to the front framerails to stiffen the front end. We finished the project by installing a window net kit and adding Magnaflow mufflers to help make Ed's car somewhat streetable. This cage was inspected at Hanksville's shop and certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile.
 


Ed’s '62 Belair

Ed has built a big cubic-inch, stroked 409 for his '62 Belair. In a hurry to complete the car, he made the mistake of buying a pre-bent cage from a big mail-order place. However, his mail-order cage had kinked bends and didn't fit his car. So, he brought his nice Belair to Hanksville for a great-fitting custom cage. Because he did not consider weight to be a concern for his big car, Ed chose to use DOM mild steel which was MIG welded to save him cost.

Since the '62 Belair's frame uses an X-design, we first trimmed the floor so that we could add rectangular tube rails to connect the inside of the X-frame to the car's rocker panels where the main hoop and forward hoops are mounted. We also trimmed the rear sheetmetal to allow us to add X-braces in the rear area of the cage, to help stiffen the chassis. As with all of Hanksville's cages, Ed's cage was designed to maximize driver headroom around the forward hoops and visibility through the windshield. This design philosophy takes more patience and care to fabricate, but provides the driver with as much room as possible, maximizing driver comfort.

We added swing-out door bars to allow Ed to get into and out of the car easily, and we also extended bars from the forward hoops to the front framerails to stiffen the front end. We finished the project by installing a window net kit and adding Magnaflow mufflers to help make Ed's car somewhat streetable. This cage was inspected at Hanksville's shop and certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile.
 


Ed’s '62 Belair

Ed has built a big cubic-inch, stroked 409 for his '62 Belair. In a hurry to complete the car, he made the mistake of buying a pre-bent cage from a big mail-order place. However, his mail-order cage had kinked bends and didn't fit his car. So, he brought his nice Belair to Hanksville for a great-fitting custom cage. Because he did not consider weight to be a concern for his big car, Ed chose to use DOM mild steel which was MIG welded to save him cost.

Since the '62 Belair's frame uses an X-design, we first trimmed the floor so that we could add rectangular tube rails to connect the inside of the X-frame to the car's rocker panels where the main hoop and forward hoops are mounted. We also trimmed the rear sheetmetal to allow us to add X-braces in the rear area of the cage, to help stiffen the chassis. As with all of Hanksville's cages, Ed's cage was designed to maximize driver headroom around the forward hoops and visibility through the windshield. This design philosophy takes more patience and care to fabricate, but provides the driver with as much room as possible, maximizing driver comfort.

We added swing-out door bars to allow Ed to get into and out of the car easily, and we also extended bars from the forward hoops to the front framerails to stiffen the front end. We finished the project by installing a window net kit and adding Magnaflow mufflers to help make Ed's car somewhat streetable. This cage was inspected at Hanksville's shop and certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile.
 


Ed’s '62 Belair

Ed has built a big cubic-inch, stroked 409 for his '62 Belair. In a hurry to complete the car, he made the mistake of buying a pre-bent cage from a big mail-order place. However, his mail-order cage had kinked bends and didn't fit his car. So, he brought his nice Belair to Hanksville for a great-fitting custom cage. Because he did not consider weight to be a concern for his big car, Ed chose to use DOM mild steel which was MIG welded to save him cost.

Since the '62 Belair's frame uses an X-design, we first trimmed the floor so that we could add rectangular tube rails to connect the inside of the X-frame to the car's rocker panels where the main hoop and forward hoops are mounted. We also trimmed the rear sheetmetal to allow us to add X-braces in the rear area of the cage, to help stiffen the chassis. As with all of Hanksville's cages, Ed's cage was designed to maximize driver headroom around the forward hoops and visibility through the windshield. This design philosophy takes more patience and care to fabricate, but provides the driver with as much room as possible, maximizing driver comfort.

We added swing-out door bars to allow Ed to get into and out of the car easily, and we also extended bars from the forward hoops to the front framerails to stiffen the front end. We finished the project by installing a window net kit and adding Magnaflow mufflers to help make Ed's car somewhat streetable. This cage was inspected at Hanksville's shop and certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile.
 


Ed’s '62 Belair

Ed has built a big cubic-inch, stroked 409 for his '62 Belair. In a hurry to complete the car, he made the mistake of buying a pre-bent cage from a big mail-order place. However, his mail-order cage had kinked bends and didn't fit his car. So, he brought his nice Belair to Hanksville for a great-fitting custom cage. Because he did not consider weight to be a concern for his big car, Ed chose to use DOM mild steel which was MIG welded to save him cost.

Since the '62 Belair's frame uses an X-design, we first trimmed the floor so that we could add rectangular tube rails to connect the inside of the X-frame to the car's rocker panels where the main hoop and forward hoops are mounted. We also trimmed the rear sheetmetal to allow us to add X-braces in the rear area of the cage, to help stiffen the chassis. As with all of Hanksville's cages, Ed's cage was designed to maximize driver headroom around the forward hoops and visibility through the windshield. This design philosophy takes more patience and care to fabricate, but provides the driver with as much room as possible, maximizing driver comfort.

We added swing-out door bars to allow Ed to get into and out of the car easily, and we also extended bars from the forward hoops to the front framerails to stiffen the front end. We finished the project by installing a window net kit and adding Magnaflow mufflers to help make Ed's car somewhat streetable. This cage was inspected at Hanksville's shop and certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile.
 


Ed’s '62 Belair

Ed has built a big cubic-inch, stroked 409 for his '62 Belair. In a hurry to complete the car, he made the mistake of buying a pre-bent cage from a big mail-order place. However, his mail-order cage had kinked bends and didn't fit his car. So, he brought his nice Belair to Hanksville for a great-fitting custom cage. Because he did not consider weight to be a concern for his big car, Ed chose to use DOM mild steel which was MIG welded to save him cost.

Since the '62 Belair's frame uses an X-design, we first trimmed the floor so that we could add rectangular tube rails to connect the inside of the X-frame to the car's rocker panels where the main hoop and forward hoops are mounted. We also trimmed the rear sheetmetal to allow us to add X-braces in the rear area of the cage, to help stiffen the chassis. As with all of Hanksville's cages, Ed's cage was designed to maximize driver headroom around the forward hoops and visibility through the windshield. This design philosophy takes more patience and care to fabricate, but provides the driver with as much room as possible, maximizing driver comfort.

We added swing-out door bars to allow Ed to get into and out of the car easily, and we also extended bars from the forward hoops to the front framerails to stiffen the front end. We finished the project by installing a window net kit and adding Magnaflow mufflers to help make Ed's car somewhat streetable. This cage was inspected at Hanksville's shop and certified to 8.50 in the quarter-mile.
 


Scott’s '68 Camaro

Scott owns A&W Auto Body, and won the 2007 USP Hot Street heads-up championship with this sweet ’68 Camaro. Although the car already had a full roll cage, Scott wanted to upgrade it. So, after the season was over, Scott stripped the car down and brought it to us for a new TIG-welded chrom-moly cage.

After removing the existing cage, we fabricated new mounting plates and welded them to the car. After careful measurement, we bent and notched the tubes using our in-house mandrel bender and our precision end-mill notcher. All tube sizes conform to the NHRA rulebook, and additional bars were used to triangulate and add strength to the cage.

In addition to the "X" style door bars and rocker bars, we added several tubes to tie into the subframes, rear shock mounts and front framerails. We added a crossbar between the rear braces, and added tubes to tie the rear braces into the parachute mount. For the additional bars, instead of welding directly to the floor, we added mounting plates to help spread the loads. It is also preferable to TIG-weld the tubes to mounting plates, since the mounting plates are thicker and the metal is often cleaner (resulting in a better weld) than the 40-year-old car’s sheetmetal floors. 

In addition to the cage, Scott asked us to tie the driveshaft loops into the subframes. To accomplish this, we fabricated an undercar structure from 1" tube that connects the front subframe rails to the rear rails (strengthening the existing subframe connectors). This tube is tied into the driveshaft safety loops and also contains tabs that serve as undercar seat supports.

After the cage was completed, we fabricated an aluminum bulkhead and package tray, in conformance with the NHRA rules regarding battery and fuel cell placement in the trunk of the car.

This cage has been certified down to 8.50, and the car was repainted in the current green color prior to the 2008 season. Thanks to Scott for allowing us the opportunity to help with this very quick championship-winning car.
 




Scott’s '68 Camaro

Scott owns A&W Auto Body, and won the 2007 USP Hot Street heads-up championship with this sweet ’68 Camaro. Although the car already had a full roll cage, Scott wanted to upgrade it. So, after the season was over, Scott stripped the car down and brought it to us for a new TIG-welded chrom-moly cage.

After removing the existing cage, we fabricated new mounting plates and welded them to the car. After careful measurement, we bent and notched the tubes using our in-house mandrel bender and our precision end-mill notcher. All tube sizes conform to the NHRA rulebook, and additional bars were used to triangulate and add strength to the cage.

In addition to the "X" style door bars and rocker bars, we added several tubes to tie into the subframes, rear shock mounts and front framerails. We added a crossbar between the rear braces, and added tubes to tie the rear braces into the parachute mount. For the additional bars, instead of welding directly to the floor, we added mounting plates to help spread the loads. It is also preferable to TIG-weld the tubes to mounting plates, since the mounting plates are thicker and the metal is often cleaner (resulting in a better weld) than the 40-year-old car’s sheetmetal floors. 

In addition to the cage, Scott asked us to tie the driveshaft loops into the subframes. To accomplish this, we fabricated an undercar structure from 1" tube that connects the front subframe rails to the rear rails (strengthening the existing subframe connectors). This tube is tied into the driveshaft safety loops and also contains tabs that serve as undercar seat supports.

After the cage was completed, we fabricated an aluminum bulkhead and package tray, in conformance with the NHRA rules regarding battery and fuel cell placement in the trunk of the car.

This cage has been certified down to 8.50, and the car was repainted in the current green color prior to the 2008 season. Thanks to Scott for allowing us the opportunity to help with this very quick championship-winning car.
 




Scott’s '68 Camaro

Scott owns A&W Auto Body, and won the 2007 USP Hot Street heads-up championship with this sweet ’68 Camaro. Although the car already had a full roll cage, Scott wanted to upgrade it. So, after the season was over, Scott stripped the car down and brought it to us for a new TIG-welded chrom-moly cage.

After removing the existing cage, we fabricated new mounting plates and welded them to the car. After careful measurement, we bent and notched the tubes using our in-house mandrel bender and our precision end-mill notcher. All tube sizes conform to the NHRA rulebook, and additional bars were used to triangulate and add strength to the cage.

In addition to the "X" style door bars and rocker bars, we added several tubes to tie into the subframes, rear shock mounts and front framerails. We added a crossbar between the rear braces, and added tubes to tie the rear braces into the parachute mount. For the additional bars, instead of welding directly to the floor, we added mounting plates to help spread the loads. It is also preferable to TIG-weld the tubes to mounting plates, since the mounting plates are thicker and the metal is often cleaner (resulting in a better weld) than the 40-year-old car’s sheetmetal floors. 

In addition to the cage, Scott asked us to tie the driveshaft loops into the subframes. To accomplish this, we fabricated an undercar structure from 1" tube that connects the front subframe rails to the rear rails (strengthening the existing subframe connectors). This tube is tied into the driveshaft safety loops and also contains tabs that serve as undercar seat supports.

After the cage was completed, we fabricated an aluminum bulkhead and package tray, in conformance with the NHRA rules regarding battery and fuel cell placement in the trunk of the car.

This cage has been certified down to 8.50, and the car was repainted in the current green color prior to the 2008 season. Thanks to Scott for allowing us the opportunity to help with this very quick championship-winning car.
 




Scott’s '68 Camaro

Scott owns A&W Auto Body, and won the 2007 USP Hot Street heads-up championship with this sweet ’68 Camaro. Although the car already had a full roll cage, Scott wanted to upgrade it. So, after the season was over, Scott stripped the car down and brought it to us for a new TIG-welded chrom-moly cage.

After removing the existing cage, we fabricated new mounting plates and welded them to the car. After careful measurement, we bent and notched the tubes using our in-house mandrel bender and our precision end-mill notcher. All tube sizes conform to the NHRA rulebook, and additional bars were used to triangulate and add strength to the cage.

In addition to the "X" style door bars and rocker bars, we added several tubes to tie into the subframes, rear shock mounts and front framerails. We added a crossbar between the rear braces, and added tubes to tie the rear braces into the parachute mount. For the additional bars, instead of welding directly to the floor, we added mounting plates to help spread the loads. It is also preferable to TIG-weld the tubes to mounting plates, since the mounting plates are thicker and the metal is often cleaner (resulting in a better weld) than the 40-year-old car’s sheetmetal floors. 

In addition to the cage, Scott asked us to tie the driveshaft loops into the subframes. To accomplish this, we fabricated an undercar structure from 1" tube that connects the front subframe rails to the rear rails (strengthening the existing subframe connectors). This tube is tied into the driveshaft safety loops and also contains tabs that serve as undercar seat supports.

After the cage was completed, we fabricated an aluminum bulkhead and package tray, in conformance with the NHRA rules regarding battery and fuel cell placement in the trunk of the car.

This cage has been certified down to 8.50, and the car was repainted in the current green color prior to the 2008 season. Thanks to Scott for allowing us the opportunity to help with this very quick championship-winning car.
 


Scott’s '68 Camaro

Scott owns A&W Auto Body, and won the 2007 USP Hot Street heads-up championship with this sweet ’68 Camaro. Although the car already had a full roll cage, Scott wanted to upgrade it. So, after the season was over, Scott stripped the car down and brought it to us for a new TIG-welded chrom-moly cage.

After removing the existing cage, we fabricated new mounting plates and welded them to the car. After careful measurement, we bent and notched the tubes using our in-house mandrel bender and our precision end-mill notcher. All tube sizes conform to the NHRA rulebook, and additional bars were used to triangulate and add strength to the cage.

In addition to the "X" style door bars and rocker bars, we added several tubes to tie into the subframes, rear shock mounts and front framerails. We added a crossbar between the rear braces, and added tubes to tie the rear braces into the parachute mount. For the additional bars, instead of welding directly to the floor, we added mounting plates to help spread the loads. It is also preferable to TIG-weld the tubes to mounting plates, since the mounting plates are thicker and the metal is often cleaner (resulting in a better weld) than the 40-year-old car’s sheetmetal floors. 

In addition to the cage, Scott asked us to tie the driveshaft loops into the subframes. To accomplish this, we fabricated an undercar structure from 1" tube that connects the front subframe rails to the rear rails (strengthening the existing subframe connectors). This tube is tied into the driveshaft safety loops and also contains tabs that serve as undercar seat supports.

After the cage was completed, we fabricated an aluminum bulkhead and package tray, in conformance with the NHRA rules regarding battery and fuel cell placement in the trunk of the car.

This cage has been certified down to 8.50, and the car was repainted in the current green color prior to the 2008 season. Thanks to Scott for allowing us the opportunity to help with this very quick championship-winning car.
 


Scott’s '68 Camaro

Scott owns A&W Auto Body, and won the 2007 USP Hot Street heads-up championship with this sweet ’68 Camaro. Although the car already had a full roll cage, Scott wanted to upgrade it. So, after the season was over, Scott stripped the car down and brought it to us for a new TIG-welded chrom-moly cage.

After removing the existing cage, we fabricated new mounting plates and welded them to the car. After careful measurement, we bent and notched the tubes using our in-house mandrel bender and our precision end-mill notcher. All tube sizes conform to the NHRA rulebook, and additional bars were used to triangulate and add strength to the cage.

In addition to the "X" style door bars and rocker bars, we added several tubes to tie into the subframes, rear shock mounts and front framerails. We added a crossbar between the rear braces, and added tubes to tie the rear braces into the parachute mount. For the additional bars, instead of welding directly to the floor, we added mounting plates to help spread the loads. It is also preferable to TIG-weld the tubes to mounting plates, since the mounting plates are thicker and the metal is often cleaner (resulting in a better weld) than the 40-year-old car’s sheetmetal floors. 

In addition to the cage, Scott asked us to tie the driveshaft loops into the subframes. To accomplish this, we fabricated an undercar structure from 1" tube that connects the front subframe rails to the rear rails (strengthening the existing subframe connectors). This tube is tied into the driveshaft safety loops and also contains tabs that serve as undercar seat supports.

After the cage was completed, we fabricated an aluminum bulkhead and package tray, in conformance with the NHRA rules regarding battery and fuel cell placement in the trunk of the car.

This cage has been certified down to 8.50, and the car was repainted in the current green color prior to the 2008 season. Thanks to Scott for allowing us the opportunity to help with this very quick championship-winning car.
 


Eric’s Foxbody Mustang

Eric works with Scott at A&W Auto Body, and also plans to race his Mustang in the USP Hot Street heads-up class. This car came to us with a mild steel roll bar, but with a new engine on the way, Eric knew that he would need to add a cage. After removing the existing roll bar, we ground-smooth and cleaned the existing mounting plates and masked the car to prepare for fabrication of the new cage.

The new cage was made from 1.625", 1.5" and 1.25" chrom-moly tube. After measuring the car, we programmed our benders and bent the various tubes. To ensure a good fit, we spent much time measuring, bending and notching all of the tubes. Eric chose to use an "X" design for the door bars, along with rocker bars to help strengthen the cage and stiffen the chassis. Additional bars were added to triangulate the cage and to attach to the upper control arm mounts, the rear shock towers, and the subframe in several places. We also tied the forward hoops into the shock towers, then added tubes to tie the shock towers into the front subframe rails.

All joints were TIG-welded, in compliance with the NHRA rulebook. After the cage fabrication and welding were complete, this car was inspected and received a certification sticker for 8.50 in the quarter mile.

In addition to the custom cage, Eric asked us to fabricate TIG-welded chrom-moly upper and lower parachute mounts, a seat back brace, window net mounts, and to tie the subframe connectors into the driveshaft safety loop.

 


Eric’s Foxbody Mustang

Eric works with Scott at A&W Auto Body, and also plans to race his Mustang in the USP Hot Street heads-up class. This car came to us with a mild steel roll bar, but with a new engine on the way, Eric knew that he would need to add a cage. After removing the existing roll bar, we ground-smooth and cleaned the existing mounting plates and masked the car to prepare for fabrication of the new cage.

The new cage was made from 1.625", 1.5" and 1.25" chrom-moly tube. After measuring the car, we programmed our benders and bent the various tubes. To ensure a good fit, we spent much time measuring, bending and notching all of the tubes. Eric chose to use an "X" design for the door bars, along with rocker bars to help strengthen the cage and stiffen the chassis. Additional bars were added to triangulate the cage and to attach to the upper control arm mounts, the rear shock towers, and the subframe in several places. We also tied the forward hoops into the shock towers, then added tubes to tie the shock towers into the front subframe rails.

All joints were TIG-welded, in compliance with the NHRA rulebook. After the cage fabrication and welding were complete, this car was inspected and received a certification sticker for 8.50 in the quarter mile.

In addition to the custom cage, Eric asked us to fabricate TIG-welded chrom-moly upper and lower parachute mounts, a seat back brace, window net mounts, and to tie the subframe connectors into the driveshaft safety loop.

 


Eric’s Foxbody Mustang

Eric works with Scott at A&W Auto Body, and also plans to race his Mustang in the USP Hot Street heads-up class. This car came to us with a mild steel roll bar, but with a new engine on the way, Eric knew that he would need to add a cage. After removing the existing roll bar, we ground-smooth and cleaned the existing mounting plates and masked the car to prepare for fabrication of the new cage.

The new cage was made from 1.625", 1.5" and 1.25" chrom-moly tube. After measuring the car, we programmed our benders and bent the various tubes. To ensure a good fit, we spent much time measuring, bending and notching all of the tubes. Eric chose to use an "X" design for the door bars, along with rocker bars to help strengthen the cage and stiffen the chassis. Additional bars were added to triangulate the cage and to attach to the upper control arm mounts, the rear shock towers, and the subframe in several places. We also tied the forward hoops into the shock towers, then added tubes to tie the shock towers into the front subframe rails.

All joints were TIG-welded, in compliance with the NHRA rulebook. After the cage fabrication and welding were complete, this car was inspected and received a certification sticker for 8.50 in the quarter mile.

In addition to the custom cage, Eric asked us to fabricate TIG-welded chrom-moly upper and lower parachute mounts, a seat back brace, window net mounts, and to tie the subframe connectors into the driveshaft safety loop.

 


Eric’s Foxbody Mustang

Eric works with Scott at A&W Auto Body, and also plans to race his Mustang in the USP Hot Street heads-up class. This car came to us with a mild steel roll bar, but with a new engine on the way, Eric knew that he would need to add a cage. After removing the existing roll bar, we ground-smooth and cleaned the existing mounting plates and masked the car to prepare for fabrication of the new cage.

The new cage was made from 1.625", 1.5" and 1.25" chrom-moly tube. After measuring the car, we programmed our benders and bent the various tubes. To ensure a good fit, we spent much time measuring, bending and notching all of the tubes. Eric chose to use an "X" design for the door bars, along with rocker bars to help strengthen the cage and stiffen the chassis. Additional bars were added to triangulate the cage and to attach to the upper control arm mounts, the rear shock towers, and the subframe in several places. We also tied the forward hoops into the shock towers, then added tubes to tie the shock towers into the front subframe rails.

All joints were TIG-welded, in compliance with the NHRA rulebook. After the cage fabrication and welding were complete, this car was inspected and received a certification sticker for 8.50 in the quarter mile.

In addition to the custom cage, Eric asked us to fabricate TIG-welded chrom-moly upper and lower parachute mounts, a seat back brace, window net mounts, and to tie the subframe connectors into the driveshaft safety loop.

 


Eric’s Foxbody Mustang

Eric works with Scott at A&W Auto Body, and also plans to race his Mustang in the USP Hot Street heads-up class. This car came to us with a mild steel roll bar, but with a new engine on the way, Eric knew that he would need to add a cage. After removing the existing roll bar, we ground-smooth and cleaned the existing mounting plates and masked the car to prepare for fabrication of the new cage.

The new cage was made from 1.625", 1.5" and 1.25" chrom-moly tube. After measuring the car, we programmed our benders and bent the various tubes. To ensure a good fit, we spent much time measuring, bending and notching all of the tubes. Eric chose to use an "X" design for the door bars, along with rocker bars to help strengthen the cage and stiffen the chassis. Additional bars were added to triangulate the cage and to attach to the upper control arm mounts, the rear shock towers, and the subframe in several places. We also tied the forward hoops into the shock towers, then added tubes to tie the shock towers into the front subframe rails.

All joints were TIG-welded, in compliance with the NHRA rulebook. After the cage fabrication and welding were complete, this car was inspected and received a certification sticker for 8.50 in the quarter mile.

In addition to the custom cage, Eric asked us to fabricate TIG-welded chrom-moly upper and lower parachute mounts, a seat back brace, window net mounts, and to tie the subframe connectors into the driveshaft safety loop.

 


Eric’s Foxbody Mustang

Eric works with Scott at A&W Auto Body, and also plans to race his Mustang in the USP Hot Street heads-up class. This car came to us with a mild steel roll bar, but with a new engine on the way, Eric knew that he would need to add a cage. After removing the existing roll bar, we ground-smooth and cleaned the existing mounting plates and masked the car to prepare for fabrication of the new cage.

The new cage was made from 1.625", 1.5" and 1.25" chrom-moly tube. After measuring the car, we programmed our benders and bent the various tubes. To ensure a good fit, we spent much time measuring, bending and notching all of the tubes. Eric chose to use an "X" design for the door bars, along with rocker bars to help strengthen the cage and stiffen the chassis. Additional bars were added to triangulate the cage and to attach to the upper control arm mounts, the rear shock towers, and the subframe in several places. We also tied the forward hoops into the shock towers, then added tubes to tie the shock towers into the front subframe rails.

All joints were TIG-welded, in compliance with the NHRA rulebook. After the cage fabrication and welding were complete, this car was inspected and received a certification sticker for 8.50 in the quarter mile.

In addition to the custom cage, Eric asked us to fabricate TIG-welded chrom-moly upper and lower parachute mounts, a seat back brace, window net mounts, and to tie the subframe connectors into the driveshaft safety loop.

 

Eric’s Foxbody Mustang

Eric works with Scott at A&W Auto Body, and also plans to race his Mustang in the USP Hot Street heads-up class. This car came to us with a mild steel roll bar, but with a new engine on the way, Eric knew that he would need to add a cage. After removing the existing roll bar, we ground-smooth and cleaned the existing mounting plates and masked the car to prepare for fabrication of the new cage.

The new cage was made from 1.625", 1.5" and 1.25" chrom-moly tube. After measuring the car, we programmed our benders and bent the various tubes. To ensure a good fit, we spent much time measuring, bending and notching all of the tubes. Eric chose to use an "X" design for the door bars, along with rocker bars to help strengthen the cage and stiffen the chassis. Additional bars were added to triangulate the cage and to attach to the upper control arm mounts, the rear shock towers, and the subframe in several places. We also tied the forward hoops into the shock towers, then added tubes to tie the shock towers into the front subframe rails.

All joints were TIG-welded, in compliance with the NHRA rulebook. After the cage fabrication and welding were complete, this car was inspected and received a certification sticker for 8.50 in the quarter mile.

In addition to the custom cage, Eric asked us to fabricate TIG-welded chrom-moly upper and lower parachute mounts, a seat back brace, window net mounts, and to tie the subframe connectors into the driveshaft safety loop.

 

Steve’s Charger

Steve owns 3 classic Chargers and is building this ’68 entirely himself - he did the custom paint job, cool airbrushed art on the decklid, and even installed the back-half kit himself. So, we were honored when he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build the TIG-welded chrom-moly cage.

We began by building tie-ins and mounting plates for the cage, then measured, bent and fabricated the roll cage tube. As with all of our custom chrom-moly roll cages, the 1.625" tube was mandrel-bent in-house here at Hanksville.

We added a diagonal bar to strengthen the rear area, and also installed swing-out door bar kits to make ingress and egress easier.

We can’t wait to see this car run once its built 440 is installed and it has its maiden voyage down the quarter mile!
 

Steve’s Charger

Steve owns 3 classic Chargers and is building this ’68 entirely himself - he did the custom paint job, cool airbrushed art on the decklid, and even installed the back-half kit himself. So, we were honored when he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build the TIG-welded chrom-moly cage.

We began by building tie-ins and mounting plates for the cage, then measured, bent and fabricated the roll cage tube. As with all of our custom chrom-moly roll cages, the 1.625" tube was mandrel-bent in-house here at Hanksville.

We added a diagonal bar to strengthen the rear area, and also installed swing-out door bar kits to make ingress and egress easier.

We can’t wait to see this car run once its built 440 is installed and it has its maiden voyage down the quarter mile!
 

Steve’s Charger

Steve owns 3 classic Chargers and is building this ’68 entirely himself - he did the custom paint job, cool airbrushed art on the decklid, and even installed the back-half kit himself. So, we were honored when he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build the TIG-welded chrom-moly cage.

We began by building tie-ins and mounting plates for the cage, then measured, bent and fabricated the roll cage tube. As with all of our custom chrom-moly roll cages, the 1.625" tube was mandrel-bent in-house here at Hanksville.

We added a diagonal bar to strengthen the rear area, and also installed swing-out door bar kits to make ingress and egress easier.

We can’t wait to see this car run once its built 440 is installed and it has its maiden voyage down the quarter mile!
 

Steve’s Charger

Steve owns 3 classic Chargers and is building this ’68 entirely himself - he did the custom paint job, cool airbrushed art on the decklid, and even installed the back-half kit himself. So, we were honored when he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build the TIG-welded chrom-moly cage.

We began by building tie-ins and mounting plates for the cage, then measured, bent and fabricated the roll cage tube. As with all of our custom chrom-moly roll cages, the 1.625" tube was mandrel-bent in-house here at Hanksville.

We added a diagonal bar to strengthen the rear area, and also installed swing-out door bar kits to make ingress and egress easier.

We can’t wait to see this car run once its built 440 is installed and it has its maiden voyage down the quarter mile!
 

Steve’s Charger

Steve owns 3 classic Chargers and is building this ’68 entirely himself - he did the custom paint job, cool airbrushed art on the decklid, and even installed the back-half kit himself. So, we were honored when he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build the TIG-welded chrom-moly cage.

We began by building tie-ins and mounting plates for the cage, then measured, bent and fabricated the roll cage tube. As with all of our custom chrom-moly roll cages, the 1.625" tube was mandrel-bent in-house here at Hanksville.

We added a diagonal bar to strengthen the rear area, and also installed swing-out door bar kits to make ingress and egress easier.

We can’t wait to see this car run once its built 440 is installed and it has its maiden voyage down the quarter mile!
 

Mike’s Foxbody Mustang

Mike is a regular racer at Bandimere Speedway, racing Club Clash events for Colorado Stangs as well as ET events. He anticipates going quicker this season, so he brought his very clean Mustang to us for a custom roll bar. We specially bent and fitted the main hoop and seat brace to accomodate his seating position. We also carefully fitted and bent the door bars (3 bends each side!) to enable him to keep the stock seat and door panel locations, while at the same time maintaining as much foot room as possible. We also installed swing-out door bar kits to allow easier ingress/egress. You won’t find this level of detail and fitment with a mail-order cage. That’s the Hanksville difference!
 

Mike’s Foxbody Mustang

Mike is a regular racer at Bandimere Speedway, racing Club Clash events for Colorado Stangs as well as ET events. He anticipates going quicker this season, so he brought his very clean Mustang to us for a custom roll bar. We specially bent and fitted the main hoop and seat brace to accomodate his seating position. We also carefully fitted and bent the door bars (3 bends each side!) to enable him to keep the stock seat and door panel locations, while at the same time maintaining as much foot room as possible. We also installed swing-out door bar kits to allow easier ingress/egress. You won’t find this level of detail and fitment with a mail-order cage. That’s the Hanksville difference!
 

Mike’s Foxbody Mustang

Mike is a regular racer at Bandimere Speedway, racing Club Clash events for Colorado Stangs as well as ET events. He anticipates going quicker this season, so he brought his very clean Mustang to us for a custom roll bar. We specially bent and fitted the main hoop and seat brace to accomodate his seating position. We also carefully fitted and bent the door bars (3 bends each side!) to enable him to keep the stock seat and door panel locations, while at the same time maintaining as much foot room as possible. We also installed swing-out door bar kits to allow easier ingress/egress. You won’t find this level of detail and fitment with a mail-order cage. That’s the Hanksville difference!
 

Mike’s Foxbody Mustang

Mike is a regular racer at Bandimere Speedway, racing Club Clash events for Colorado Stangs as well as ET events. He anticipates going quicker this season, so he brought his very clean Mustang to us for a custom roll bar. We specially bent and fitted the main hoop and seat brace to accomodate his seating position. We also carefully fitted and bent the door bars (3 bends each side!) to enable him to keep the stock seat and door panel locations, while at the same time maintaining as much foot room as possible. We also installed swing-out door bar kits to allow easier ingress/egress. You won’t find this level of detail and fitment with a mail-order cage. That’s the Hanksville difference!
 

Mike’s Foxbody Mustang

Mike is a regular racer at Bandimere Speedway, racing Club Clash events for Colorado Stangs as well as ET events. He anticipates going quicker this season, so he brought his very clean Mustang to us for a custom roll bar. We specially bent and fitted the main hoop and seat brace to accomodate his seating position. We also carefully fitted and bent the door bars (3 bends each side!) to enable him to keep the stock seat and door panel locations, while at the same time maintaining as much foot room as possible. We also installed swing-out door bar kits to allow easier ingress/egress. You won’t find this level of detail and fitment with a mail-order cage. That’s the Hanksville difference!
 

Mike’s Foxbody Mustang

Mike is a regular racer at Bandimere Speedway, racing Club Clash events for Colorado Stangs as well as ET events. He anticipates going quicker this season, so he brought his very clean Mustang to us for a custom roll bar. We specially bent and fitted the main hoop and seat brace to accomodate his seating position. We also carefully fitted and bent the door bars (3 bends each side!) to enable him to keep the stock seat and door panel locations, while at the same time maintaining as much foot room as possible. We also installed swing-out door bar kits to allow easier ingress/egress. You won’t find this level of detail and fitment with a mail-order cage. That’s the Hanksville difference!
 

Mike’s Foxbody Mustang

Mike is a regular racer at Bandimere Speedway, racing Club Clash events for Colorado Stangs as well as ET events. He anticipates going quicker this season, so he brought his very clean Mustang to us for a custom roll bar. We specially bent and fitted the main hoop and seat brace to accomodate his seating position. We also carefully fitted and bent the door bars (3 bends each side!) to enable him to keep the stock seat and door panel locations, while at the same time maintaining as much foot room as possible. We also installed swing-out door bar kits to allow easier ingress/egress. You won’t find this level of detail and fitment with a mail-order cage. That’s the Hanksville difference!
 

Mike’s Foxbody Mustang

Mike is a regular racer at Bandimere Speedway, racing Club Clash events for Colorado Stangs as well as ET events. He anticipates going quicker this season, so he brought his very clean Mustang to us for a custom roll bar. We specially bent and fitted the main hoop and seat brace to accomodate his seating position. We also carefully fitted and bent the door bars (3 bends each side!) to enable him to keep the stock seat and door panel locations, while at the same time maintaining as much foot room as possible. We also installed swing-out door bar kits to allow easier ingress/egress. You won’t find this level of detail and fitment with a mail-order cage. That’s the Hanksville difference!
 

Mike’s Foxbody Mustang

Mike is a regular racer at Bandimere Speedway, racing Club Clash events for Colorado Stangs as well as ET events. He anticipates going quicker this season, so he brought his very clean Mustang to us for a custom roll bar. We specially bent and fitted the main hoop and seat brace to accomodate his seating position. We also carefully fitted and bent the door bars (3 bends each side!) to enable him to keep the stock seat and door panel locations, while at the same time maintaining as much foot room as possible. We also installed swing-out door bar kits to allow easier ingress/egress. You won’t find this level of detail and fitment with a mail-order cage. That’s the Hanksville difference!
 

Dennis’ Super Bee

Dennis regularly races his Super Bee in the Club Clash and ET series events at Bandimere Speedway. In addition to driving a very sweet Mopar, Dennis has also won many rounds of racing!

Knowing that he was bumping up against the requirement that he have a roll bar if running faster than 11.50, Dennis chose Hanksville Hot Rods to fabricate and install a new roll bar in his Super Bee. Since weight is not a significant factor in this car’s performance, Dennis chose DOM mild steel as the material for the roll bar.

We started the project by completely masking the interior and exterior of the car, then prepped the floors for welding. We then carefully measured the car’s interior and programmed our software and tube bender, which allows us to precisely bend and fabricate great-fitting roll bars and cages. All the tube intersections were notched using our production-quality end-mill notcher, then all joints were MIG-welded. Before returning the car to Dennis, we cleaned and painted the roll bar.

We’re looking forward to sponsoring Dennis during the upcoming season, and to seeing this car go many more rounds in the future!

 


Dennis’ Super Bee

Dennis regularly races his Super Bee in the Club Clash and ET series events at Bandimere Speedway. In addition to driving a very sweet Mopar, Dennis has also won many rounds of racing!

Knowing that he was bumping up against the requirement that he have a roll bar if running faster than 11.50, Dennis chose Hanksville Hot Rods to fabricate and install a new roll bar in his Super Bee. Since weight is not a significant factor in this car’s performance, Dennis chose DOM mild steel as the material for the roll bar.

We started the project by completely masking the interior and exterior of the car, then prepped the floors for welding. We then carefully measured the car’s interior and programmed our software and tube bender, which allows us to precisely bend and fabricate great-fitting roll bars and cages. All the tube intersections were notched using our production-quality end-mill notcher, then all joints were MIG-welded. Before returning the car to Dennis, we cleaned and painted the roll bar.

We’re looking forward to sponsoring Dennis during the upcoming season, and to seeing this car go many more rounds in the future!

 


Scott's Dart

Scott's Dart already had a roll bar, but he wanted a full cage since he was planning to add more power for the upcoming season. We added main hoop "D" bars, forward hoops, a windshield bar, a dash bar and a removable/swing-out door bar kit to make this cage legal down to 8.50. All of the welds were TIG-welded for the best appearance and quality.

The new tubes fit tightly inside the car's interior; the forward hoops touch the roofline and the A-pillars in several places and the windshield bar is tucked-up and out of the driver's vision. The dash bar features bends to allow it to fit further away from Scott's knees while still strengthening the front portion of the new cage.

Scott's Dart

Scott's Dart already had a roll bar, but he wanted a full cage since he was planning to add more power for the upcoming season. We added main hoop "D" bars, forward hoops, a windshield bar, a dash bar and a removable/swing-out door bar kit to make this cage legal down to 8.50. All of the welds were TIG-welded for the best appearance and quality.

The new tubes fit tightly inside the car's interior; the forward hoops touch the roofline and the A-pillars in several places and the windshield bar is tucked-up and out of the driver's vision. The dash bar features bends to allow it to fit further away from Scott's knees while still strengthening the front portion of the new cage.

Scott's Dart

Scott's Dart already had a roll bar, but he wanted a full cage since he was planning to add more power for the upcoming season. We added main hoop "D" bars, forward hoops, a windshield bar, a dash bar and a removable/swing-out door bar kit to make this cage legal down to 8.50. All of the welds were TIG-welded for the best appearance and quality.

The new tubes fit tightly inside the car's interior; the forward hoops touch the roofline and the A-pillars in several places and the windshield bar is tucked-up and out of the driver's vision. The dash bar features bends to allow it to fit further away from Scott's knees while still strengthening the front portion of the new cage.

Scott's Dart

Scott's Dart already had a roll bar, but he wanted a full cage since he was planning to add more power for the upcoming season. We added main hoop "D" bars, forward hoops, a windshield bar, a dash bar and a removable/swing-out door bar kit to make this cage legal down to 8.50. All of the welds were TIG-welded for the best appearance and quality.

The new tubes fit tightly inside the car's interior; the forward hoops touch the roofline and the A-pillars in several places and the windshield bar is tucked-up and out of the driver's vision. The dash bar features bends to allow it to fit further away from Scott's knees while still strengthening the front portion of the new cage.

Scott's Dart

Scott's Dart already had a roll bar, but he wanted a full cage since he was planning to add more power for the upcoming season. We added main hoop "D" bars, forward hoops, a windshield bar, a dash bar and a removable/swing-out door bar kit to make this cage legal down to 8.50. All of the welds were TIG-welded for the best appearance and quality.

The new tubes fit tightly inside the car's interior; the forward hoops touch the roofline and the A-pillars in several places and the windshield bar is tucked-up and out of the driver's vision. The dash bar features bends to allow it to fit further away from Scott's knees while still strengthening the front portion of the new cage.

Scott's Dart

Scott's Dart already had a roll bar, but he wanted a full cage since he was planning to add more power for the upcoming season. We added main hoop "D" bars, forward hoops, a windshield bar, a dash bar and a removable/swing-out door bar kit to make this cage legal down to 8.50. All of the welds were TIG-welded for the best appearance and quality.

The new tubes fit tightly inside the car's interior; the forward hoops touch the roofline and the A-pillars in several places and the windshield bar is tucked-up and out of the driver's vision. The dash bar features bends to allow it to fit further away from Scott's knees while still strengthening the front portion of the new cage.

Scott's Dart

Scott's Dart already had a roll bar, but he wanted a full cage since he was planning to add more power for the upcoming season. We added main hoop "D" bars, forward hoops, a windshield bar, a dash bar and a removable/swing-out door bar kit to make this cage legal down to 8.50. All of the welds were TIG-welded for the best appearance and quality.

The new tubes fit tightly inside the car's interior; the forward hoops touch the roofline and the A-pillars in several places and the windshield bar is tucked-up and out of the driver's vision. The dash bar features bends to allow it to fit further away from Scott's knees while still strengthening the front portion of the new cage.

Scott's Dart

Scott's Dart already had a roll bar, but he wanted a full cage since he was planning to add more power for the upcoming season. We added main hoop "D" bars, forward hoops, a windshield bar, a dash bar and a removable/swing-out door bar kit to make this cage legal down to 8.50. All of the welds were TIG-welded for the best appearance and quality.

The new tubes fit tightly inside the car's interior; the forward hoops touch the roofline and the A-pillars in several places and the windshield bar is tucked-up and out of the driver's vision. The dash bar features bends to allow it to fit further away from Scott's knees while still strengthening the front portion of the new cage.

Scott's Dart

Scott's Dart already had a roll bar, but he wanted a full cage since he was planning to add more power for the upcoming season. We added main hoop "D" bars, forward hoops, a windshield bar, a dash bar and a removable/swing-out door bar kit to make this cage legal down to 8.50. All of the welds were TIG-welded for the best appearance and quality.

The new tubes fit tightly inside the car's interior; the forward hoops touch the roofline and the A-pillars in several places and the windshield bar is tucked-up and out of the driver's vision. The dash bar features bends to allow it to fit further away from Scott's knees while still strengthening the front portion of the new cage.

Scott's Dart

Scott's Dart already had a roll bar, but he wanted a full cage since he was planning to add more power for the upcoming season. We added main hoop "D" bars, forward hoops, a windshield bar, a dash bar and a removable/swing-out door bar kit to make this cage legal down to 8.50. All of the welds were TIG-welded for the best appearance and quality.

The new tubes fit tightly inside the car's interior; the forward hoops touch the roofline and the A-pillars in several places and the windshield bar is tucked-up and out of the driver's vision. The dash bar features bends to allow it to fit further away from Scott's knees while still strengthening the front portion of the new cage.

Scott's Dart

Scott's Dart already had a roll bar, but he wanted a full cage since he was planning to add more power for the upcoming season. We added main hoop "D" bars, forward hoops, a windshield bar, a dash bar and a removable/swing-out door bar kit to make this cage legal down to 8.50. All of the welds were TIG-welded for the best appearance and quality.

The new tubes fit tightly inside the car's interior; the forward hoops touch the roofline and the A-pillars in several places and the windshield bar is tucked-up and out of the driver's vision. The dash bar features bends to allow it to fit further away from Scott's knees while still strengthening the front portion of the new cage.

Scott's Dart

Scott's Dart already had a roll bar, but he wanted a full cage since he was planning to add more power for the upcoming season. We added main hoop "D" bars, forward hoops, a windshield bar, a dash bar and a removable/swing-out door bar kit to make this cage legal down to 8.50. All of the welds were TIG-welded for the best appearance and quality.

The new tubes fit tightly inside the car's interior; the forward hoops touch the roofline and the A-pillars in several places and the windshield bar is tucked-up and out of the driver's vision. The dash bar features bends to allow it to fit further away from Scott's knees while still strengthening the front portion of the new cage.

Scott's Dart

Scott's Dart already had a roll bar, but he wanted a full cage since he was planning to add more power for the upcoming season. We added main hoop "D" bars, forward hoops, a windshield bar, a dash bar and a removable/swing-out door bar kit to make this cage legal down to 8.50. All of the welds were TIG-welded for the best appearance and quality.

The new tubes fit tightly inside the car's interior; the forward hoops touch the roofline and the A-pillars in several places and the windshield bar is tucked-up and out of the driver's vision. The dash bar features bends to allow it to fit further away from Scott's knees while still strengthening the front portion of the new cage.

Scott's Dart

Scott's Dart already had a roll bar, but he wanted a full cage since he was planning to add more power for the upcoming season. We added main hoop "D" bars, forward hoops, a windshield bar, a dash bar and a removable/swing-out door bar kit to make this cage legal down to 8.50. All of the welds were TIG-welded for the best appearance and quality.

The new tubes fit tightly inside the car's interior; the forward hoops touch the roofline and the A-pillars in several places and the windshield bar is tucked-up and out of the driver's vision. The dash bar features bends to allow it to fit further away from Scott's knees while still strengthening the front portion of the new cage.

Stormy’s '31 Model A

Stormy, also a regular racer at Bandimere, has a mean Model A powered by a blown big-block Chevy. While this car already runs 10.6s at Bandi, Stormy has new heads, a bigger blower, and a bigger carb planned for this winter. The car already has a roll bar but Stormy asked us to install a cage.

Using 1 5/8" DOM tube, we built off the existing roll bar, adding a halo, "A" pillar bars, and a dash bar. We also strengthened the existing roll bar mounts and added seat belt mounting tabs and braces. The end result is a great-fitting, great-looking and functional cage that accentuates the styling of this aggressive rod.
 

Stormy’s '31 Model A

Stormy, also a regular racer at Bandimere, has a mean Model A powered by a blown big-block Chevy. While this car already runs 10.6s at Bandi, Stormy has new heads, a bigger blower, and a bigger carb planned for this winter. The car already has a roll bar but Stormy asked us to install a cage.

Using 1 5/8" DOM tube, we built off the existing roll bar, adding a halo, "A" pillar bars, and a dash bar. We also strengthened the existing roll bar mounts and added seat belt mounting tabs and braces. The end result is a great-fitting, great-looking and functional cage that accentuates the styling of this aggressive rod.
 

Stormy’s '31 Model A

Stormy, also a regular racer at Bandimere, has a mean Model A powered by a blown big-block Chevy. While this car already runs 10.6s at Bandi, Stormy has new heads, a bigger blower, and a bigger carb planned for this winter. The car already has a roll bar but Stormy asked us to install a cage.

Using 1 5/8" DOM tube, we built off the existing roll bar, adding a halo, "A" pillar bars, and a dash bar. We also strengthened the existing roll bar mounts and added seat belt mounting tabs and braces. The end result is a great-fitting, great-looking and functional cage that accentuates the styling of this aggressive rod.
 

Stormy’s '31 Model A

Stormy, also a regular racer at Bandimere, has a mean Model A powered by a blown big-block Chevy. While this car already runs 10.6s at Bandi, Stormy has new heads, a bigger blower, and a bigger carb planned for this winter. The car already has a roll bar but Stormy asked us to install a cage.

Using 1 5/8" DOM tube, we built off the existing roll bar, adding a halo, "A" pillar bars, and a dash bar. We also strengthened the existing roll bar mounts and added seat belt mounting tabs and braces. The end result is a great-fitting, great-looking and functional cage that accentuates the styling of this aggressive rod.
 

Stormy’s '31 Model A

Stormy, also a regular racer at Bandimere, has a mean Model A powered by a blown big-block Chevy. While this car already runs 10.6s at Bandi, Stormy has new heads, a bigger blower, and a bigger carb planned for this winter. The car already has a roll bar but Stormy asked us to install a cage.

Using 1 5/8" DOM tube, we built off the existing roll bar, adding a halo, "A" pillar bars, and a dash bar. We also strengthened the existing roll bar mounts and added seat belt mounting tabs and braces. The end result is a great-fitting, great-looking and functional cage that accentuates the styling of this aggressive rod.
 

Stormy’s '31 Model A

Stormy, also a regular racer at Bandimere, has a mean Model A powered by a blown big-block Chevy. While this car already runs 10.6s at Bandi, Stormy has new heads, a bigger blower, and a bigger carb planned for this winter. The car already has a roll bar but Stormy asked us to install a cage.

Using 1 5/8" DOM tube, we built off the existing roll bar, adding a halo, "A" pillar bars, and a dash bar. We also strengthened the existing roll bar mounts and added seat belt mounting tabs and braces. The end result is a great-fitting, great-looking and functional cage that accentuates the styling of this aggressive rod.
 

Stormy’s '31 Model A

Stormy, also a regular racer at Bandimere, has a mean Model A powered by a blown big-block Chevy. While this car already runs 10.6s at Bandi, Stormy has new heads, a bigger blower, and a bigger carb planned for this winter. The car already has a roll bar but Stormy asked us to install a cage.

Using 1 5/8" DOM tube, we built off the existing roll bar, adding a halo, "A" pillar bars, and a dash bar. We also strengthened the existing roll bar mounts and added seat belt mounting tabs and braces. The end result is a great-fitting, great-looking and functional cage that accentuates the styling of this aggressive rod.
 

Stormy’s '31 Model A

Stormy, also a regular racer at Bandimere, has a mean Model A powered by a blown big-block Chevy. While this car already runs 10.6s at Bandi, Stormy has new heads, a bigger blower, and a bigger carb planned for this winter. The car already has a roll bar but Stormy asked us to install a cage.

Using 1 5/8" DOM tube, we built off the existing roll bar, adding a halo, "A" pillar bars, and a dash bar. We also strengthened the existing roll bar mounts and added seat belt mounting tabs and braces. The end result is a great-fitting, great-looking and functional cage that accentuates the styling of this aggressive rod.
 

Matt’s '01 Camaro

Matt was the lucky winner of our 2006 Colorado Track Day roll bar prize. He went with a DOM roll bar with stationary door bars. He wanted to keep the rear seat, so we ran the door bars over the rear seat back for a very unique appearance. We also TIG-welded the bar so that it looks super-clean.

Look at the rear seat area - you could comfortably sit back there, if it weren’t for the crossbar!

Matt chose to save money and not install swing-out door bars. This makes entry and egress a little more difficult, not not too bad thanks to the T-tops.
 

Matt’s '01 Camaro

Matt was the lucky winner of our 2006 Colorado Track Day roll bar prize. He went with a DOM roll bar with stationary door bars. He wanted to keep the rear seat, so we ran the door bars over the rear seat back for a very unique appearance. We also TIG-welded the bar so that it looks super-clean.

Look at the rear seat area - you could comfortably sit back there, if it weren’t for the crossbar!

Matt chose to save money and not install swing-out door bars. This makes entry and egress a little more difficult, not not too bad thanks to the T-tops.
 

Matt’s '01 Camaro

Matt was the lucky winner of our 2006 Colorado Track Day roll bar prize. He went with a DOM roll bar with stationary door bars. He wanted to keep the rear seat, so we ran the door bars over the rear seat back for a very unique appearance. We also TIG-welded the bar so that it looks super-clean.

Look at the rear seat area - you could comfortably sit back there, if it weren’t for the crossbar!

Matt chose to save money and not install swing-out door bars. This makes entry and egress a little more difficult, not not too bad thanks to the T-tops.
 

Don’s '03 Cobra

Wanting additional strength for high-performance driving, Don went with a TIG-welded 1.75" chrom-moly "B" hoop with cross brace and rear braces extending into the trunk area. Since the roll bar was mostly welded inside the car, we took great care to mask off the entire interior and exterior of the vehicle, and shielded the headliner and interior trim from the heat generated by the welding processes. We painted the bar with a PPG silver metallic basecoat with clearcoat to accentuate the interior.
 

Don’s '03 Cobra

Wanting additional strength for high-performance driving, Don went with a TIG-welded 1.75" chrom-moly "B" hoop with cross brace and rear braces extending into the trunk area. Since the roll bar was mostly welded inside the car, we took great care to mask off the entire interior and exterior of the vehicle, and shielded the headliner and interior trim from the heat generated by the welding processes. We painted the bar with a PPG silver metallic basecoat with clearcoat to accentuate the interior.
 

Scott’s '03 Cobra

Scott really knows how to get power out of a blown DOHC 4.6. The mill in his ’03 Cobra puts out over 750 hp to the rear wheels up in the thin air of Denver, and the car runs 11.2s without the nitrous. With factory-quality driveability, of course. Gotta love those mod motors!

Unfortunately, Scott wrapped his roll bar in foam cushioning before we could get a good pic. This bar features 1.75" chrom-moly construction, TIG welding, and swing-out door bars. Scott chose to go with an 8-point bar to make it easier to upgrade to a full cage at a later date.

 

Scott’s '03 Cobra

Scott really knows how to get power out of a blown DOHC 4.6. The mill in his ’03 Cobra puts out over 750 hp to the rear wheels up in the thin air of Denver, and the car runs 11.2s without the nitrous. With factory-quality driveability, of course. Gotta love those mod motors!

Unfortunately, Scott wrapped his roll bar in foam cushioning before we could get a good pic. This bar features 1.75" chrom-moly construction, TIG welding, and swing-out door bars. Scott chose to go with an 8-point bar to make it easier to upgrade to a full cage at a later date.

 

Scott’s '03 Cobra

Scott really knows how to get power out of a blown DOHC 4.6. The mill in his ’03 Cobra puts out over 750 hp to the rear wheels up in the thin air of Denver, and the car runs 11.2s without the nitrous. With factory-quality driveability, of course. Gotta love those mod motors!

Unfortunately, Scott wrapped his roll bar in foam cushioning before we could get a good pic. This bar features 1.75" chrom-moly construction, TIG welding, and swing-out door bars. Scott chose to go with an 8-point bar to make it easier to upgrade to a full cage at a later date.

 

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