Projects  >  Roll Bar & Cage Projects  >  Porsche Cages

Porsche Club and German Touring Sportscars Cage Projects

Hanksville Hot Rods builds lots of Porsche cages! In fact, we build more cages for Porsches than for any other make of car - more than 112 Porsche roll bar and cage projects as of November '13, for 911/964s, Boxsters, Caymans, 924/944/951/968s, and a 914!

Our Porsche customers race in NASA's German Touring Sportscar classes, Porsche Club of America club racing, in SCCA and in vintage racing. Here are some examples of Porsche cages we have built.

NEW! We offer mail-order, ready-to-weld cage kits for Porsche 911s, 944s and Boxsters. These kits are available in standard 6-point configuration, or add optional footwell connectors and additional points to further attach to the car. These ready-to-weld kits are pre-bent, pre-notched, test-fitted inside an actual Porsche car. They feature the same great, tight-fit that all of our cages are known for, at a very reasonable price. Call or email for more information on our high-quality mail-order cage kits! 


Chad's Porsche 911

Chad brought his '86 911 to Hanksville after hearing about us from the Porsche Club of America-Rocky Mountain Region. The custom cage that we have built for Chad's car will continue its progression from a very capable street/track car to an all-out club race car.

This TIG-welded cage was made from 1.5"x.095" 4130 chrom-moly tube, and features several optional bars in addition to the required 6-point cage design. We added a dash bar, tucked-up underneath and behind the lower dash pads to maximize legroom while still providing additional strength for the front of the cage. We also added a roof bar and tube gussets to triangulate the upper corners of the cage. Despite the additional bars, this cage turned-out to be very light!

In addition to this great-fitting cage, we fabricated custom TIG-welded seat mounts and custom window net attachments. It was great to see Chad enjoy his new race car during the 2012 season, and we look forward to seeing him and his 911 at more events in the future!

(Thank you to Bruce Bell for the great on-track photos!)


Chad's Porsche 911

Chad brought his '86 911 to Hanksville after hearing about us from the Porsche Club of America-Rocky Mountain Region. The custom cage that we have built for Chad's car will continue its progression from a very capable street/track car to an all-out club race car.

This TIG-welded cage was made from 1.5"x.095" 4130 chrom-moly tube, and features several optional bars in addition to the required 6-point cage design. We added a dash bar, tucked-up underneath and behind the lower dash pads to maximize legroom while still providing additional strength for the front of the cage. We also added a roof bar and tube gussets to triangulate the upper corners of the cage. Despite the additional bars, this cage turned-out to be very light!

In addition to this great-fitting cage, we fabricated custom TIG-welded seat mounts and custom window net attachments. It was great to see Chad enjoy his new race car during the 2012 season, and we look forward to seeing him and his 911 at more events in the future!

(Thank you to Bruce Bell for the great on-track photos!)


Chad's Porsche 911

Chad brought his '86 911 to Hanksville after hearing about us from the Porsche Club of America-Rocky Mountain Region. The custom cage that we have built for Chad's car will continue its progression from a very capable street/track car to an all-out club race car.

This TIG-welded cage was made from 1.5"x.095" 4130 chrom-moly tube, and features several optional bars in addition to the required 6-point cage design. We added a dash bar, tucked-up underneath and behind the lower dash pads to maximize legroom while still providing additional strength for the front of the cage. We also added a roof bar and tube gussets to triangulate the upper corners of the cage. Despite the additional bars, this cage turned-out to be very light!

In addition to this great-fitting cage, we fabricated custom TIG-welded seat mounts and custom window net attachments. It was great to see Chad enjoy his new race car during the 2012 season, and we look forward to seeing him and his 911 at more events in the future!

(Thank you to Bruce Bell for the great on-track photos!)


Chad's Porsche 911

Chad brought his '86 911 to Hanksville after hearing about us from the Porsche Club of America-Rocky Mountain Region. The custom cage that we have built for Chad's car will continue its progression from a very capable street/track car to an all-out club race car.

This TIG-welded cage was made from 1.5"x.095" 4130 chrom-moly tube, and features several optional bars in addition to the required 6-point cage design. We added a dash bar, tucked-up underneath and behind the lower dash pads to maximize legroom while still providing additional strength for the front of the cage. We also added a roof bar and tube gussets to triangulate the upper corners of the cage. Despite the additional bars, this cage turned-out to be very light!

In addition to this great-fitting cage, we fabricated custom TIG-welded seat mounts and custom window net attachments. It was great to see Chad enjoy his new race car during the 2012 season, and we look forward to seeing him and his 911 at more events in the future!

(Thank you to Bruce Bell for the great on-track photos!)


Chad's Porsche 911

Chad brought his '86 911 to Hanksville after hearing about us from the Porsche Club of America-Rocky Mountain Region. The custom cage that we have built for Chad's car will continue its progression from a very capable street/track car to an all-out club race car.

This TIG-welded cage was made from 1.5"x.095" 4130 chrom-moly tube, and features several optional bars in addition to the required 6-point cage design. We added a dash bar, tucked-up underneath and behind the lower dash pads to maximize legroom while still providing additional strength for the front of the cage. We also added a roof bar and tube gussets to triangulate the upper corners of the cage. Despite the additional bars, this cage turned-out to be very light!

In addition to this great-fitting cage, we fabricated custom TIG-welded seat mounts and custom window net attachments. It was great to see Chad enjoy his new race car during the 2012 season, and we look forward to seeing him and his 911 at more events in the future!

(Thank you to Bruce Bell for the great on-track photos!)


Chad's Porsche 911

Chad brought his '86 911 to Hanksville after hearing about us from the Porsche Club of America-Rocky Mountain Region. The custom cage that we have built for Chad's car will continue its progression from a very capable street/track car to an all-out club race car.

This TIG-welded cage was made from 1.5"x.095" 4130 chrom-moly tube, and features several optional bars in addition to the required 6-point cage design. We added a dash bar, tucked-up underneath and behind the lower dash pads to maximize legroom while still providing additional strength for the front of the cage. We also added a roof bar and tube gussets to triangulate the upper corners of the cage. Despite the additional bars, this cage turned-out to be very light!

In addition to this great-fitting cage, we fabricated custom TIG-welded seat mounts and custom window net attachments. It was great to see Chad enjoy his new race car during the 2012 season, and we look forward to seeing him and his 911 at more events in the future!

(Thank you to Bruce Bell for the great on-track photos!)


Chad's Porsche 911

Chad brought his '86 911 to Hanksville after hearing about us from the Porsche Club of America-Rocky Mountain Region. The custom cage that we have built for Chad's car will continue its progression from a very capable street/track car to an all-out club race car.

This TIG-welded cage was made from 1.5"x.095" 4130 chrom-moly tube, and features several optional bars in addition to the required 6-point cage design. We added a dash bar, tucked-up underneath and behind the lower dash pads to maximize legroom while still providing additional strength for the front of the cage. We also added a roof bar and tube gussets to triangulate the upper corners of the cage. Despite the additional bars, this cage turned-out to be very light!

In addition to this great-fitting cage, we fabricated custom TIG-welded seat mounts and custom window net attachments. It was great to see Chad enjoy his new race car during the 2012 season, and we look forward to seeing him and his 911 at more events in the future!

(Thank you to Bruce Bell for the great on-track photos!)


Chad's Porsche 911

Chad brought his '86 911 to Hanksville after hearing about us from the Porsche Club of America-Rocky Mountain Region. The custom cage that we have built for Chad's car will continue its progression from a very capable street/track car to an all-out club race car.

This TIG-welded cage was made from 1.5"x.095" 4130 chrom-moly tube, and features several optional bars in addition to the required 6-point cage design. We added a dash bar, tucked-up underneath and behind the lower dash pads to maximize legroom while still providing additional strength for the front of the cage. We also added a roof bar and tube gussets to triangulate the upper corners of the cage. Despite the additional bars, this cage turned-out to be very light!

In addition to this great-fitting cage, we fabricated custom TIG-welded seat mounts and custom window net attachments. It was great to see Chad enjoy his new race car during the 2012 season, and we look forward to seeing him and his 911 at more events in the future!

(Thank you to Bruce Bell for the great on-track photos!)


Chad's Porsche 911

Chad brought his '86 911 to Hanksville after hearing about us from the Porsche Club of America-Rocky Mountain Region. The custom cage that we have built for Chad's car will continue its progression from a very capable street/track car to an all-out club race car.

This TIG-welded cage was made from 1.5"x.095" 4130 chrom-moly tube, and features several optional bars in addition to the required 6-point cage design. We added a dash bar, tucked-up underneath and behind the lower dash pads to maximize legroom while still providing additional strength for the front of the cage. We also added a roof bar and tube gussets to triangulate the upper corners of the cage. Despite the additional bars, this cage turned-out to be very light!

In addition to this great-fitting cage, we fabricated custom TIG-welded seat mounts and custom window net attachments. It was great to see Chad enjoy his new race car during the 2012 season, and we look forward to seeing him and his 911 at more events in the future!

(Thank you to Bruce Bell for the great on-track photos!)


Chad's Porsche 911

Chad brought his '86 911 to Hanksville after hearing about us from the Porsche Club of America-Rocky Mountain Region. The custom cage that we have built for Chad's car will continue its progression from a very capable street/track car to an all-out club race car.

This TIG-welded cage was made from 1.5"x.095" 4130 chrom-moly tube, and features several optional bars in addition to the required 6-point cage design. We added a dash bar, tucked-up underneath and behind the lower dash pads to maximize legroom while still providing additional strength for the front of the cage. We also added a roof bar and tube gussets to triangulate the upper corners of the cage. Despite the additional bars, this cage turned-out to be very light!

In addition to this great-fitting cage, we fabricated custom TIG-welded seat mounts and custom window net attachments. It was great to see Chad enjoy his new race car during the 2012 season, and we look forward to seeing him and his 911 at more events in the future!

(Thank you to Bruce Bell for the great on-track photos!)


Chad's Porsche 911

Chad brought his '86 911 to Hanksville after hearing about us from the Porsche Club of America-Rocky Mountain Region. The custom cage that we have built for Chad's car will continue its progression from a very capable street/track car to an all-out club race car.

This TIG-welded cage was made from 1.5"x.095" 4130 chrom-moly tube, and features several optional bars in addition to the required 6-point cage design. We added a dash bar, tucked-up underneath and behind the lower dash pads to maximize legroom while still providing additional strength for the front of the cage. We also added a roof bar and tube gussets to triangulate the upper corners of the cage. Despite the additional bars, this cage turned-out to be very light!

In addition to this great-fitting cage, we fabricated custom TIG-welded seat mounts and custom window net attachments. It was great to see Chad enjoy his new race car during the 2012 season, and we look forward to seeing him and his 911 at more events in the future!

(Thank you to Bruce Bell for the great on-track photos!)


Chad's Porsche 911

Chad brought his '86 911 to Hanksville after hearing about us from the Porsche Club of America-Rocky Mountain Region. The custom cage that we have built for Chad's car will continue its progression from a very capable street/track car to an all-out club race car.

This TIG-welded cage was made from 1.5"x.095" 4130 chrom-moly tube, and features several optional bars in addition to the required 6-point cage design. We added a dash bar, tucked-up underneath and behind the lower dash pads to maximize legroom while still providing additional strength for the front of the cage. We also added a roof bar and tube gussets to triangulate the upper corners of the cage. Despite the additional bars, this cage turned-out to be very light!

In addition to this great-fitting cage, we fabricated custom TIG-welded seat mounts and custom window net attachments. It was great to see Chad enjoy his new race car during the 2012 season, and we look forward to seeing him and his 911 at more events in the future!

(Thank you to Bruce Bell for the great on-track photos!)


Chad's Porsche 911

Chad brought his '86 911 to Hanksville after hearing about us from the Porsche Club of America-Rocky Mountain Region. The custom cage that we have built for Chad's car will continue its progression from a very capable street/track car to an all-out club race car.

This TIG-welded cage was made from 1.5"x.095" 4130 chrom-moly tube, and features several optional bars in addition to the required 6-point cage design. We added a dash bar, tucked-up underneath and behind the lower dash pads to maximize legroom while still providing additional strength for the front of the cage. We also added a roof bar and tube gussets to triangulate the upper corners of the cage. Despite the additional bars, this cage turned-out to be very light!

In addition to this great-fitting cage, we fabricated custom TIG-welded seat mounts and custom window net attachments. It was great to see Chad enjoy his new race car during the 2012 season, and we look forward to seeing him and his 911 at more events in the future!

(Thank you to Bruce Bell for the great on-track photos!)


Chad's Porsche 911

Chad brought his '86 911 to Hanksville after hearing about us from the Porsche Club of America-Rocky Mountain Region. The custom cage that we have built for Chad's car will continue its progression from a very capable street/track car to an all-out club race car.

This TIG-welded cage was made from 1.5"x.095" 4130 chrom-moly tube, and features several optional bars in addition to the required 6-point cage design. We added a dash bar, tucked-up underneath and behind the lower dash pads to maximize legroom while still providing additional strength for the front of the cage. We also added a roof bar and tube gussets to triangulate the upper corners of the cage. Despite the additional bars, this cage turned-out to be very light!

In addition to this great-fitting cage, we fabricated custom TIG-welded seat mounts and custom window net attachments. It was great to see Chad enjoy his new race car during the 2012 season, and we look forward to seeing him and his 911 at more events in the future!

(Thank you to Bruce Bell for the great on-track photos!)


Chad's Porsche 911

Chad brought his '86 911 to Hanksville after hearing about us from the Porsche Club of America-Rocky Mountain Region. The custom cage that we have built for Chad's car will continue its progression from a very capable street/track car to an all-out club race car.

This TIG-welded cage was made from 1.5"x.095" 4130 chrom-moly tube, and features several optional bars in addition to the required 6-point cage design. We added a dash bar, tucked-up underneath and behind the lower dash pads to maximize legroom while still providing additional strength for the front of the cage. We also added a roof bar and tube gussets to triangulate the upper corners of the cage. Despite the additional bars, this cage turned-out to be very light!

In addition to this great-fitting cage, we fabricated custom TIG-welded seat mounts and custom window net attachments. It was great to see Chad enjoy his new race car during the 2012 season, and we look forward to seeing him and his 911 at more events in the future!

(Thank you to Bruce Bell for the great on-track photos!)


Ross's Porsche 911

Ross's 911 used to be owned by his father, so we were honored that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build his car's new cage. This car, to be raced in vintage, Porsche Club and NASA GTS classes, already had a nice suspension, powerplant swap and cage tubes that extended into the front and rear suspension areas. However, the existing cage was not race-legal and needed improvement. So, Ross had the cage removed from the driver compartment and asked us to build a strong cage that would help to stiffen the center of the chassis.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .095" DOM. Ross wanted to keep the existing door panels, so we slightly extended the X-style door bars which are strengthened by the vertical tube spreaders connecting the X's to the rocker bars. We added rear area X-bars and tube gussets for additional strengthening.


Ross's Porsche 911

Ross's 911 used to be owned by his father, so we were honored that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build his car's new cage. This car, to be raced in vintage, Porsche Club and NASA GTS classes, already had a nice suspension, powerplant swap and cage tubes that extended into the front and rear suspension areas. However, the existing cage was not race-legal and needed improvement. So, Ross had the cage removed from the driver compartment and asked us to build a strong cage that would help to stiffen the center of the chassis.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .095" DOM. Ross wanted to keep the existing door panels, so we slightly extended the X-style door bars which are strengthened by the vertical tube spreaders connecting the X's to the rocker bars. We added rear area X-bars and tube gussets for additional strengthening.


Ross's Porsche 911

Ross's 911 used to be owned by his father, so we were honored that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build his car's new cage. This car, to be raced in vintage, Porsche Club and NASA GTS classes, already had a nice suspension, powerplant swap and cage tubes that extended into the front and rear suspension areas. However, the existing cage was not race-legal and needed improvement. So, Ross had the cage removed from the driver compartment and asked us to build a strong cage that would help to stiffen the center of the chassis.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .095" DOM. Ross wanted to keep the existing door panels, so we slightly extended the X-style door bars which are strengthened by the vertical tube spreaders connecting the X's to the rocker bars. We added rear area X-bars and tube gussets for additional strengthening.


Ross's Porsche 911

Ross's 911 used to be owned by his father, so we were honored that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build his car's new cage. This car, to be raced in vintage, Porsche Club and NASA GTS classes, already had a nice suspension, powerplant swap and cage tubes that extended into the front and rear suspension areas. However, the existing cage was not race-legal and needed improvement. So, Ross had the cage removed from the driver compartment and asked us to build a strong cage that would help to stiffen the center of the chassis.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .095" DOM. Ross wanted to keep the existing door panels, so we slightly extended the X-style door bars which are strengthened by the vertical tube spreaders connecting the X's to the rocker bars. We added rear area X-bars and tube gussets for additional strengthening.


Ross's Porsche 911

Ross's 911 used to be owned by his father, so we were honored that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build his car's new cage. This car, to be raced in vintage, Porsche Club and NASA GTS classes, already had a nice suspension, powerplant swap and cage tubes that extended into the front and rear suspension areas. However, the existing cage was not race-legal and needed improvement. So, Ross had the cage removed from the driver compartment and asked us to build a strong cage that would help to stiffen the center of the chassis.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .095" DOM. Ross wanted to keep the existing door panels, so we slightly extended the X-style door bars which are strengthened by the vertical tube spreaders connecting the X's to the rocker bars. We added rear area X-bars and tube gussets for additional strengthening.


Ross's Porsche 911

Ross's 911 used to be owned by his father, so we were honored that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build his car's new cage. This car, to be raced in vintage, Porsche Club and NASA GTS classes, already had a nice suspension, powerplant swap and cage tubes that extended into the front and rear suspension areas. However, the existing cage was not race-legal and needed improvement. So, Ross had the cage removed from the driver compartment and asked us to build a strong cage that would help to stiffen the center of the chassis.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .095" DOM. Ross wanted to keep the existing door panels, so we slightly extended the X-style door bars which are strengthened by the vertical tube spreaders connecting the X's to the rocker bars. We added rear area X-bars and tube gussets for additional strengthening.


Ross's Porsche 911

Ross's 911 used to be owned by his father, so we were honored that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build his car's new cage. This car, to be raced in vintage, Porsche Club and NASA GTS classes, already had a nice suspension, powerplant swap and cage tubes that extended into the front and rear suspension areas. However, the existing cage was not race-legal and needed improvement. So, Ross had the cage removed from the driver compartment and asked us to build a strong cage that would help to stiffen the center of the chassis.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .095" DOM. Ross wanted to keep the existing door panels, so we slightly extended the X-style door bars which are strengthened by the vertical tube spreaders connecting the X's to the rocker bars. We added rear area X-bars and tube gussets for additional strengthening.


Dave's Porsche Cayman S

Dave currently races a nice 911 in PCA events. However, after purchasing this brand-new Cayman S, he decided to use it for Production class racing. We feel very privileged that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to help turn his new Cayman S into a full-time race car.

While discussing the various classes in which Dave planned to race, he asked us to make this car as versatile as possible, and to build the cage to be compliant with PCA, SCCA and NASA rules. Wanting the cage to be strong and as lightweight as possible, Dave asked us to use chrom-moly tube. The final information we needed was the car's target race weight, which is just under 3,000 lbs. So, we recommended to Dave that we use TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" 4130 chrom-moly tube for the main structure/required elements of the cage, and a combination of 1.5" x .095", 1.25" x .065" and 1" x .065" chrom-moly tube for the non-required and  triangulation bars and tube gussets. This keeps the cage legal for all three sanctioning bodies, while at the same time managing weight and increasing strength with the additional bars.

To keep the cage legal for the Production class, this cage uses a 6-point design, with mounting plates for the main hoop, forward hoops and rear braces. The front of the cage is cross-braced with the required windshield bar as well as a dash bar that is fitted at the front bulkhead, just below the windshield and dash. Triangulation gussets in the forward hoop/windshield bar joints, and in the forward hoop/dash bar joints add strength in front of the driver. The rear braces are tie into the rear shock towers, with additional strengthening provided by a shock tower crossbar and additional bars connecting the shock towers with the middle of the main hoop. Dave decided not to use a triangulation bar or X-bars in the rear area, since these would have limited his rearward vision. So instead, we added triangulation bars in all four corners of the rear braces to help with chassis and cage stiffening.

After trimming the existing door openings, we built Extended-Style door bars in both doors, and added rocker bars on both sides. These bars are interconnected with vertical spreaders to help distribute potential loads.

In addition to the cage, Dave asked us to fabricate interior door pulls; Lexan side windows which are fastened with Dzus hardware; SFI-approved window net and cage padding; custom mirror, camera mount and helmet hook tabs; and a steering wheel quick-release. In order to maximize driver space, we removed the factory seat mounts, trimmed the floor, and fabricated new driver-side seat mounts. This allowed us to install the Racetech seat approx. 1" lower than it would have fit otherwise, providing Dave with valuable headroom. We also fabricated custom seat mounts on the passenger-side and custom lap and anti-sub belt mounts on both sides.

After all of the fabrication was completed, we re-masked the car and painted the cage using automotive paint and professional detail paint equipment. We then reinstalled the dash and installed the safety harnesses and seats.
 







Dave's Porsche Cayman S

Dave currently races a nice 911 in PCA events. However, after purchasing this brand-new Cayman S, he decided to use it for Production class racing. We feel very privileged that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to help turn his new Cayman S into a full-time race car.

While discussing the various classes in which Dave planned to race, he asked us to make this car as versatile as possible, and to build the cage to be compliant with PCA, SCCA and NASA rules. Wanting the cage to be strong and as lightweight as possible, Dave asked us to use chrom-moly tube. The final information we needed was the car's target race weight, which is just under 3,000 lbs. So, we recommended to Dave that we use TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" 4130 chrom-moly tube for the main structure/required elements of the cage, and a combination of 1.5" x .095", 1.25" x .065" and 1" x .065" chrom-moly tube for the non-required and  triangulation bars and tube gussets. This keeps the cage legal for all three sanctioning bodies, while at the same time managing weight and increasing strength with the additional bars.

To keep the cage legal for the Production class, this cage uses a 6-point design, with mounting plates for the main hoop, forward hoops and rear braces. The front of the cage is cross-braced with the required windshield bar as well as a dash bar that is fitted at the front bulkhead, just below the windshield and dash. Triangulation gussets in the forward hoop/windshield bar joints, and in the forward hoop/dash bar joints add strength in front of the driver. The rear braces are tie into the rear shock towers, with additional strengthening provided by a shock tower crossbar and additional bars connecting the shock towers with the middle of the main hoop. Dave decided not to use a triangulation bar or X-bars in the rear area, since these would have limited his rearward vision. So instead, we added triangulation bars in all four corners of the rear braces to help with chassis and cage stiffening.

After trimming the existing door openings, we built Extended-Style door bars in both doors, and added rocker bars on both sides. These bars are interconnected with vertical spreaders to help distribute potential loads.

In addition to the cage, Dave asked us to fabricate interior door pulls; Lexan side windows which are fastened with Dzus hardware; SFI-approved window net and cage padding; custom mirror, camera mount and helmet hook tabs; and a steering wheel quick-release. In order to maximize driver space, we removed the factory seat mounts, trimmed the floor, and fabricated new driver-side seat mounts. This allowed us to install the Racetech seat approx. 1" lower than it would have fit otherwise, providing Dave with valuable headroom. We also fabricated custom seat mounts on the passenger-side and custom lap and anti-sub belt mounts on both sides.

After all of the fabrication was completed, we re-masked the car and painted the cage using automotive paint and professional detail paint equipment. We then reinstalled the dash and installed the safety harnesses and seats.
 






Dave's Porsche Cayman S

Dave currently races a nice 911 in PCA events. However, after purchasing this brand-new Cayman S, he decided to use it for Production class racing. We feel very privileged that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to help turn his new Cayman S into a full-time race car.

While discussing the various classes in which Dave planned to race, he asked us to make this car as versatile as possible, and to build the cage to be compliant with PCA, SCCA and NASA rules. Wanting the cage to be strong and as lightweight as possible, Dave asked us to use chrom-moly tube. The final information we needed was the car's target race weight, which is just under 3,000 lbs. So, we recommended to Dave that we use TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" 4130 chrom-moly tube for the main structure/required elements of the cage, and a combination of 1.5" x .095", 1.25" x .065" and 1" x .065" chrom-moly tube for the non-required and  triangulation bars and tube gussets. This keeps the cage legal for all three sanctioning bodies, while at the same time managing weight and increasing strength with the additional bars.

To keep the cage legal for the Production class, this cage uses a 6-point design, with mounting plates for the main hoop, forward hoops and rear braces. The front of the cage is cross-braced with the required windshield bar as well as a dash bar that is fitted at the front bulkhead, just below the windshield and dash. Triangulation gussets in the forward hoop/windshield bar joints, and in the forward hoop/dash bar joints add strength in front of the driver. The rear braces are tie into the rear shock towers, with additional strengthening provided by a shock tower crossbar and additional bars connecting the shock towers with the middle of the main hoop. Dave decided not to use a triangulation bar or X-bars in the rear area, since these would have limited his rearward vision. So instead, we added triangulation bars in all four corners of the rear braces to help with chassis and cage stiffening.

After trimming the existing door openings, we built Extended-Style door bars in both doors, and added rocker bars on both sides. These bars are interconnected with vertical spreaders to help distribute potential loads.

In addition to the cage, Dave asked us to fabricate interior door pulls; Lexan side windows which are fastened with Dzus hardware; SFI-approved window net and cage padding; custom mirror, camera mount and helmet hook tabs; and a steering wheel quick-release. In order to maximize driver space, we removed the factory seat mounts, trimmed the floor, and fabricated new driver-side seat mounts. This allowed us to install the Racetech seat approx. 1" lower than it would have fit otherwise, providing Dave with valuable headroom. We also fabricated custom seat mounts on the passenger-side and custom lap and anti-sub belt mounts on both sides.

After all of the fabrication was completed, we re-masked the car and painted the cage using automotive paint and professional detail paint equipment. We then reinstalled the dash and installed the safety harnesses and seats.
 






Dave's Porsche Cayman S

Dave currently races a nice 911 in PCA events. However, after purchasing this brand-new Cayman S, he decided to use it for Production class racing. We feel very privileged that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to help turn his new Cayman S into a full-time race car.

While discussing the various classes in which Dave planned to race, he asked us to make this car as versatile as possible, and to build the cage to be compliant with PCA, SCCA and NASA rules. Wanting the cage to be strong and as lightweight as possible, Dave asked us to use chrom-moly tube. The final information we needed was the car's target race weight, which is just under 3,000 lbs. So, we recommended to Dave that we use TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" 4130 chrom-moly tube for the main structure/required elements of the cage, and a combination of 1.5" x .095", 1.25" x .065" and 1" x .065" chrom-moly tube for the non-required and  triangulation bars and tube gussets. This keeps the cage legal for all three sanctioning bodies, while at the same time managing weight and increasing strength with the additional bars.

To keep the cage legal for the Production class, this cage uses a 6-point design, with mounting plates for the main hoop, forward hoops and rear braces. The front of the cage is cross-braced with the required windshield bar as well as a dash bar that is fitted at the front bulkhead, just below the windshield and dash. Triangulation gussets in the forward hoop/windshield bar joints, and in the forward hoop/dash bar joints add strength in front of the driver. The rear braces are tie into the rear shock towers, with additional strengthening provided by a shock tower crossbar and additional bars connecting the shock towers with the middle of the main hoop. Dave decided not to use a triangulation bar or X-bars in the rear area, since these would have limited his rearward vision. So instead, we added triangulation bars in all four corners of the rear braces to help with chassis and cage stiffening.

After trimming the existing door openings, we built Extended-Style door bars in both doors, and added rocker bars on both sides. These bars are interconnected with vertical spreaders to help distribute potential loads.

In addition to the cage, Dave asked us to fabricate interior door pulls; Lexan side windows which are fastened with Dzus hardware; SFI-approved window net and cage padding; custom mirror, camera mount and helmet hook tabs; and a steering wheel quick-release. In order to maximize driver space, we removed the factory seat mounts, trimmed the floor, and fabricated new driver-side seat mounts. This allowed us to install the Racetech seat approx. 1" lower than it would have fit otherwise, providing Dave with valuable headroom. We also fabricated custom seat mounts on the passenger-side and custom lap and anti-sub belt mounts on both sides.

After all of the fabrication was completed, we re-masked the car and painted the cage using automotive paint and professional detail paint equipment. We then reinstalled the dash and installed the safety harnesses and seats.
 






Dave's Porsche Cayman S

Dave currently races a nice 911 in PCA events. However, after purchasing this brand-new Cayman S, he decided to use it for Production class racing. We feel very privileged that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to help turn his new Cayman S into a full-time race car.

While discussing the various classes in which Dave planned to race, he asked us to make this car as versatile as possible, and to build the cage to be compliant with PCA, SCCA and NASA rules. Wanting the cage to be strong and as lightweight as possible, Dave asked us to use chrom-moly tube. The final information we needed was the car's target race weight, which is just under 3,000 lbs. So, we recommended to Dave that we use TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" 4130 chrom-moly tube for the main structure/required elements of the cage, and a combination of 1.5" x .095", 1.25" x .065" and 1" x .065" chrom-moly tube for the non-required and  triangulation bars and tube gussets. This keeps the cage legal for all three sanctioning bodies, while at the same time managing weight and increasing strength with the additional bars.

To keep the cage legal for the Production class, this cage uses a 6-point design, with mounting plates for the main hoop, forward hoops and rear braces. The front of the cage is cross-braced with the required windshield bar as well as a dash bar that is fitted at the front bulkhead, just below the windshield and dash. Triangulation gussets in the forward hoop/windshield bar joints, and in the forward hoop/dash bar joints add strength in front of the driver. The rear braces are tie into the rear shock towers, with additional strengthening provided by a shock tower crossbar and additional bars connecting the shock towers with the middle of the main hoop. Dave decided not to use a triangulation bar or X-bars in the rear area, since these would have limited his rearward vision. So instead, we added triangulation bars in all four corners of the rear braces to help with chassis and cage stiffening.

After trimming the existing door openings, we built Extended-Style door bars in both doors, and added rocker bars on both sides. These bars are interconnected with vertical spreaders to help distribute potential loads.

In addition to the cage, Dave asked us to fabricate interior door pulls; Lexan side windows which are fastened with Dzus hardware; SFI-approved window net and cage padding; custom mirror, camera mount and helmet hook tabs; and a steering wheel quick-release. In order to maximize driver space, we removed the factory seat mounts, trimmed the floor, and fabricated new driver-side seat mounts. This allowed us to install the Racetech seat approx. 1" lower than it would have fit otherwise, providing Dave with valuable headroom. We also fabricated custom seat mounts on the passenger-side and custom lap and anti-sub belt mounts on both sides.

After all of the fabrication was completed, we re-masked the car and painted the cage using automotive paint and professional detail paint equipment. We then reinstalled the dash and installed the safety harnesses and seats.
 






Dave currently races a nice 911 in PCA events. However, after purchasing this brand-new Cayman S, he decided to use it for Production class racing. We feel very privileged that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to help turn his new Cayman S into a full-time race car.

While discussing the various classes in which Dave planned to race, he asked us to make this car as versatile as possible, and to build the cage to be compliant with PCA, SCCA and NASA rules. Wanting the cage to be strong and as lightweight as possible, Dave asked us to use chrom-moly tube. The final information we needed was the car's target race weight, which is just under 3,000 lbs. So, we recommended to Dave that we use TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" 4130 chrom-moly tube for the main structure/required elements of the cage, and a combination of 1.5" x .095", 1.25" x .065" and 1" x .065" chrom-moly tube for the non-required and  triangulation bars and tube gussets. This keeps the cage legal for all three sanctioning bodies, while at the same time managing weight and increasing strength with the additional bars.

To keep the cage legal for the Production class, this cage uses a 6-point design, with mounting plates for the main hoop, forward hoops and rear braces. The front of the cage is cross-braced with the required windshield bar as well as a dash bar that is fitted at the front bulkhead, just below the windshield and dash. Triangulation gussets in the forward hoop/windshield bar joints, and in the forward hoop/dash bar joints add strength in front of the driver. The rear braces are tie into the rear shock towers, with additional strengthening provided by a shock tower crossbar and additional bars connecting the shock towers with the middle of the main hoop. Dave decided not to use a triangulation bar or X-bars in the rear area, since these would have limited his rearward vision. So instead, we added triangulation bars in all four corners of the rear braces to help with chassis and cage stiffening.

After trimming the existing door openings, we built Extended-Style door bars in both doors, and added rocker bars on both sides. These bars are interconnected with vertical spreaders to help distribute potential loads.

In addition to the cage, Dave asked us to fabricate interior door pulls; Lexan side windows which are fastened with Dzus hardware; SFI-approved window net and cage padding; custom mirror, camera mount and helmet hook tabs; and a steering wheel quick-release. In order to maximize driver space, we removed the factory seat mounts, trimmed the floor, and fabricated new driver-side seat mounts. This allowed us to install the Racetech seat approx. 1" lower than it would have fit otherwise, providing Dave with valuable headroom. We also fabricated custom seat mounts on the passenger-side and custom lap and anti-sub belt mounts on both sides.

After all of the fabrication was completed, we re-masked the car and painted the cage using automotive paint and professional detail paint equipment. We then reinstalled the dash and installed the safety harnesses and seats.
 







The upper corners of the main hoop are touching the roof of the car.
Dave's Porsche Cayman S

Dave currently races a nice 911 in PCA events. However, after purchasing this brand-new Cayman S, he decided to use it for Production class racing. We feel very privileged that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to help turn his new Cayman S into a full-time race car.

While discussing the various classes in which Dave planned to race, he asked us to make this car as versatile as possible, and to build the cage to be compliant with PCA, SCCA and NASA rules. Wanting the cage to be strong and as lightweight as possible, Dave asked us to use chrom-moly tube. The final information we needed was the car's target race weight, which is just under 3,000 lbs. So, we recommended to Dave that we use TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" 4130 chrom-moly tube for the main structure/required elements of the cage, and a combination of 1.5" x .095", 1.25" x .065" and 1" x .065" chrom-moly tube for the non-required and  triangulation bars and tube gussets. This keeps the cage legal for all three sanctioning bodies, while at the same time managing weight and increasing strength with the additional bars.

To keep the cage legal for the Production class, this cage uses a 6-point design, with mounting plates for the main hoop, forward hoops and rear braces. The front of the cage is cross-braced with the required windshield bar as well as a dash bar that is fitted at the front bulkhead, just below the windshield and dash. Triangulation gussets in the forward hoop/windshield bar joints, and in the forward hoop/dash bar joints add strength in front of the driver. The rear braces are tie into the rear shock towers, with additional strengthening provided by a shock tower crossbar and additional bars connecting the shock towers with the middle of the main hoop. Dave decided not to use a triangulation bar or X-bars in the rear area, since these would have limited his rearward vision. So instead, we added triangulation bars in all four corners of the rear braces to help with chassis and cage stiffening.

After trimming the existing door openings, we built Extended-Style door bars in both doors, and added rocker bars on both sides. These bars are interconnected with vertical spreaders to help distribute potential loads.

In addition to the cage, Dave asked us to fabricate interior door pulls; Lexan side windows which are fastened with Dzus hardware; SFI-approved window net and cage padding; custom mirror, camera mount and helmet hook tabs; and a steering wheel quick-release. In order to maximize driver space, we removed the factory seat mounts, trimmed the floor, and fabricated new driver-side seat mounts. This allowed us to install the Racetech seat approx. 1" lower than it would have fit otherwise, providing Dave with valuable headroom. We also fabricated custom seat mounts on the passenger-side and custom lap and anti-sub belt mounts on both sides.

After all of the fabrication was completed, we re-masked the car and painted the cage using automotive paint and professional detail paint equipment. We then reinstalled the dash and installed the safety harnesses and seats.
 






Dave's Porsche Cayman S

Dave currently races a nice 911 in PCA events. However, after purchasing this brand-new Cayman S, he decided to use it for Production class racing. We feel very privileged that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to help turn his new Cayman S into a full-time race car.

While discussing the various classes in which Dave planned to race, he asked us to make this car as versatile as possible, and to build the cage to be compliant with PCA, SCCA and NASA rules. Wanting the cage to be strong and as lightweight as possible, Dave asked us to use chrom-moly tube. The final information we needed was the car's target race weight, which is just under 3,000 lbs. So, we recommended to Dave that we use TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" 4130 chrom-moly tube for the main structure/required elements of the cage, and a combination of 1.5" x .095", 1.25" x .065" and 1" x .065" chrom-moly tube for the non-required and  triangulation bars and tube gussets. This keeps the cage legal for all three sanctioning bodies, while at the same time managing weight and increasing strength with the additional bars.

To keep the cage legal for the Production class, this cage uses a 6-point design, with mounting plates for the main hoop, forward hoops and rear braces. The front of the cage is cross-braced with the required windshield bar as well as a dash bar that is fitted at the front bulkhead, just below the windshield and dash. Triangulation gussets in the forward hoop/windshield bar joints, and in the forward hoop/dash bar joints add strength in front of the driver. The rear braces are tie into the rear shock towers, with additional strengthening provided by a shock tower crossbar and additional bars connecting the shock towers with the middle of the main hoop. Dave decided not to use a triangulation bar or X-bars in the rear area, since these would have limited his rearward vision. So instead, we added triangulation bars in all four corners of the rear braces to help with chassis and cage stiffening.

After trimming the existing door openings, we built Extended-Style door bars in both doors, and added rocker bars on both sides. These bars are interconnected with vertical spreaders to help distribute potential loads.

In addition to the cage, Dave asked us to fabricate interior door pulls; Lexan side windows which are fastened with Dzus hardware; SFI-approved window net and cage padding; custom mirror, camera mount and helmet hook tabs; and a steering wheel quick-release. In order to maximize driver space, we removed the factory seat mounts, trimmed the floor, and fabricated new driver-side seat mounts. This allowed us to install the Racetech seat approx. 1" lower than it would have fit otherwise, providing Dave with valuable headroom. We also fabricated custom seat mounts on the passenger-side and custom lap and anti-sub belt mounts on both sides.

After all of the fabrication was completed, we re-masked the car and painted the cage using automotive paint and professional detail paint equipment. We then reinstalled the dash and installed the safety harnesses and seats.
 






Dave's Porsche Cayman S

Dave currently races a nice 911 in PCA events. However, after purchasing this brand-new Cayman S, he decided to use it for Production class racing. We feel very privileged that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to help turn his new Cayman S into a full-time race car.

While discussing the various classes in which Dave planned to race, he asked us to make this car as versatile as possible, and to build the cage to be compliant with PCA, SCCA and NASA rules. Wanting the cage to be strong and as lightweight as possible, Dave asked us to use chrom-moly tube. The final information we needed was the car's target race weight, which is just under 3,000 lbs. So, we recommended to Dave that we use TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" 4130 chrom-moly tube for the main structure/required elements of the cage, and a combination of 1.5" x .095", 1.25" x .065" and 1" x .065" chrom-moly tube for the non-required and  triangulation bars and tube gussets. This keeps the cage legal for all three sanctioning bodies, while at the same time managing weight and increasing strength with the additional bars.

To keep the cage legal for the Production class, this cage uses a 6-point design, with mounting plates for the main hoop, forward hoops and rear braces. The front of the cage is cross-braced with the required windshield bar as well as a dash bar that is fitted at the front bulkhead, just below the windshield and dash. Triangulation gussets in the forward hoop/windshield bar joints, and in the forward hoop/dash bar joints add strength in front of the driver. The rear braces are tie into the rear shock towers, with additional strengthening provided by a shock tower crossbar and additional bars connecting the shock towers with the middle of the main hoop. Dave decided not to use a triangulation bar or X-bars in the rear area, since these would have limited his rearward vision. So instead, we added triangulation bars in all four corners of the rear braces to help with chassis and cage stiffening.

After trimming the existing door openings, we built Extended-Style door bars in both doors, and added rocker bars on both sides. These bars are interconnected with vertical spreaders to help distribute potential loads.

In addition to the cage, Dave asked us to fabricate interior door pulls; Lexan side windows which are fastened with Dzus hardware; SFI-approved window net and cage padding; custom mirror, camera mount and helmet hook tabs; and a steering wheel quick-release. In order to maximize driver space, we removed the factory seat mounts, trimmed the floor, and fabricated new driver-side seat mounts. This allowed us to install the Racetech seat approx. 1" lower than it would have fit otherwise, providing Dave with valuable headroom. We also fabricated custom seat mounts on the passenger-side and custom lap and anti-sub belt mounts on both sides.

After all of the fabrication was completed, we re-masked the car and painted the cage using automotive paint and professional detail paint equipment. We then reinstalled the dash and installed the safety harnesses and seats.
 






Dave's Porsche Cayman S

Dave currently races a nice 911 in PCA events. However, after purchasing this brand-new Cayman S, he decided to use it for Production class racing. We feel very privileged that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to help turn his new Cayman S into a full-time race car.

While discussing the various classes in which Dave planned to race, he asked us to make this car as versatile as possible, and to build the cage to be compliant with PCA, SCCA and NASA rules. Wanting the cage to be strong and as lightweight as possible, Dave asked us to use chrom-moly tube. The final information we needed was the car's target race weight, which is just under 3,000 lbs. So, we recommended to Dave that we use TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" 4130 chrom-moly tube for the main structure/required elements of the cage, and a combination of 1.5" x .095", 1.25" x .065" and 1" x .065" chrom-moly tube for the non-required and  triangulation bars and tube gussets. This keeps the cage legal for all three sanctioning bodies, while at the same time managing weight and increasing strength with the additional bars.

To keep the cage legal for the Production class, this cage uses a 6-point design, with mounting plates for the main hoop, forward hoops and rear braces. The front of the cage is cross-braced with the required windshield bar as well as a dash bar that is fitted at the front bulkhead, just below the windshield and dash. Triangulation gussets in the forward hoop/windshield bar joints, and in the forward hoop/dash bar joints add strength in front of the driver. The rear braces are tie into the rear shock towers, with additional strengthening provided by a shock tower crossbar and additional bars connecting the shock towers with the middle of the main hoop. Dave decided not to use a triangulation bar or X-bars in the rear area, since these would have limited his rearward vision. So instead, we added triangulation bars in all four corners of the rear braces to help with chassis and cage stiffening.

After trimming the existing door openings, we built Extended-Style door bars in both doors, and added rocker bars on both sides. These bars are interconnected with vertical spreaders to help distribute potential loads.

In addition to the cage, Dave asked us to fabricate interior door pulls; Lexan side windows which are fastened with Dzus hardware; SFI-approved window net and cage padding; custom mirror, camera mount and helmet hook tabs; and a steering wheel quick-release. In order to maximize driver space, we removed the factory seat mounts, trimmed the floor, and fabricated new driver-side seat mounts. This allowed us to install the Racetech seat approx. 1" lower than it would have fit otherwise, providing Dave with valuable headroom. We also fabricated custom seat mounts on the passenger-side and custom lap and anti-sub belt mounts on both sides.

After all of the fabrication was completed, we re-masked the car and painted the cage using automotive paint and professional detail paint equipment. We then reinstalled the dash and installed the safety harnesses and seats.
 






Dave's Porsche Cayman S

Dave currently races a nice 911 in PCA events. However, after purchasing this brand-new Cayman S, he decided to use it for Production class racing. We feel very privileged that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to help turn his new Cayman S into a full-time race car.

While discussing the various classes in which Dave planned to race, he asked us to make this car as versatile as possible, and to build the cage to be compliant with PCA, SCCA and NASA rules. Wanting the cage to be strong and as lightweight as possible, Dave asked us to use chrom-moly tube. The final information we needed was the car's target race weight, which is just under 3,000 lbs. So, we recommended to Dave that we use TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" 4130 chrom-moly tube for the main structure/required elements of the cage, and a combination of 1.5" x .095", 1.25" x .065" and 1" x .065" chrom-moly tube for the non-required and  triangulation bars and tube gussets. This keeps the cage legal for all three sanctioning bodies, while at the same time managing weight and increasing strength with the additional bars.

To keep the cage legal for the Production class, this cage uses a 6-point design, with mounting plates for the main hoop, forward hoops and rear braces. The front of the cage is cross-braced with the required windshield bar as well as a dash bar that is fitted at the front bulkhead, just below the windshield and dash. Triangulation gussets in the forward hoop/windshield bar joints, and in the forward hoop/dash bar joints add strength in front of the driver. The rear braces are tie into the rear shock towers, with additional strengthening provided by a shock tower crossbar and additional bars connecting the shock towers with the middle of the main hoop. Dave decided not to use a triangulation bar or X-bars in the rear area, since these would have limited his rearward vision. So instead, we added triangulation bars in all four corners of the rear braces to help with chassis and cage stiffening.

After trimming the existing door openings, we built Extended-Style door bars in both doors, and added rocker bars on both sides. These bars are interconnected with vertical spreaders to help distribute potential loads.

In addition to the cage, Dave asked us to fabricate interior door pulls; Lexan side windows which are fastened with Dzus hardware; SFI-approved window net and cage padding; custom mirror, camera mount and helmet hook tabs; and a steering wheel quick-release. In order to maximize driver space, we removed the factory seat mounts, trimmed the floor, and fabricated new driver-side seat mounts. This allowed us to install the Racetech seat approx. 1" lower than it would have fit otherwise, providing Dave with valuable headroom. We also fabricated custom seat mounts on the passenger-side and custom lap and anti-sub belt mounts on both sides.

After all of the fabrication was completed, we re-masked the car and painted the cage using automotive paint and professional detail paint equipment. We then reinstalled the dash and installed the safety harnesses and seats.
 






Dave's Porsche Cayman S

Dave currently races a nice 911 in PCA events. However, after purchasing this brand-new Cayman S, he decided to use it for Production class racing. We feel very privileged that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to help turn his new Cayman S into a full-time race car.

While discussing the various classes in which Dave planned to race, he asked us to make this car as versatile as possible, and to build the cage to be compliant with PCA, SCCA and NASA rules. Wanting the cage to be strong and as lightweight as possible, Dave asked us to use chrom-moly tube. The final information we needed was the car's target race weight, which is just under 3,000 lbs. So, we recommended to Dave that we use TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" 4130 chrom-moly tube for the main structure/required elements of the cage, and a combination of 1.5" x .095", 1.25" x .065" and 1" x .065" chrom-moly tube for the non-required and  triangulation bars and tube gussets. This keeps the cage legal for all three sanctioning bodies, while at the same time managing weight and increasing strength with the additional bars.

To keep the cage legal for the Production class, this cage uses a 6-point design, with mounting plates for the main hoop, forward hoops and rear braces. The front of the cage is cross-braced with the required windshield bar as well as a dash bar that is fitted at the front bulkhead, just below the windshield and dash. Triangulation gussets in the forward hoop/windshield bar joints, and in the forward hoop/dash bar joints add strength in front of the driver. The rear braces are tie into the rear shock towers, with additional strengthening provided by a shock tower crossbar and additional bars connecting the shock towers with the middle of the main hoop. Dave decided not to use a triangulation bar or X-bars in the rear area, since these would have limited his rearward vision. So instead, we added triangulation bars in all four corners of the rear braces to help with chassis and cage stiffening.

After trimming the existing door openings, we built Extended-Style door bars in both doors, and added rocker bars on both sides. These bars are interconnected with vertical spreaders to help distribute potential loads.

In addition to the cage, Dave asked us to fabricate interior door pulls; Lexan side windows which are fastened with Dzus hardware; SFI-approved window net and cage padding; custom mirror, camera mount and helmet hook tabs; and a steering wheel quick-release. In order to maximize driver space, we removed the factory seat mounts, trimmed the floor, and fabricated new driver-side seat mounts. This allowed us to install the Racetech seat approx. 1" lower than it would have fit otherwise, providing Dave with valuable headroom. We also fabricated custom seat mounts on the passenger-side and custom lap and anti-sub belt mounts on both sides.

After all of the fabrication was completed, we re-masked the car and painted the cage using automotive paint and professional detail paint equipment. We then reinstalled the dash and installed the safety harnesses and seats.
 






Dave's Porsche Cayman S

Dave currently races a nice 911 in PCA events. However, after purchasing this brand-new Cayman S, he decided to use it for Production class racing. We feel very privileged that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to help turn his new Cayman S into a full-time race car.

While discussing the various classes in which Dave planned to race, he asked us to make this car as versatile as possible, and to build the cage to be compliant with PCA, SCCA and NASA rules. Wanting the cage to be strong and as lightweight as possible, Dave asked us to use chrom-moly tube. The final information we needed was the car's target race weight, which is just under 3,000 lbs. So, we recommended to Dave that we use TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" 4130 chrom-moly tube for the main structure/required elements of the cage, and a combination of 1.5" x .095", 1.25" x .065" and 1" x .065" chrom-moly tube for the non-required and  triangulation bars and tube gussets. This keeps the cage legal for all three sanctioning bodies, while at the same time managing weight and increasing strength with the additional bars.

To keep the cage legal for the Production class, this cage uses a 6-point design, with mounting plates for the main hoop, forward hoops and rear braces. The front of the cage is cross-braced with the required windshield bar as well as a dash bar that is fitted at the front bulkhead, just below the windshield and dash. Triangulation gussets in the forward hoop/windshield bar joints, and in the forward hoop/dash bar joints add strength in front of the driver. The rear braces are tie into the rear shock towers, with additional strengthening provided by a shock tower crossbar and additional bars connecting the shock towers with the middle of the main hoop. Dave decided not to use a triangulation bar or X-bars in the rear area, since these would have limited his rearward vision. So instead, we added triangulation bars in all four corners of the rear braces to help with chassis and cage stiffening.

After trimming the existing door openings, we built Extended-Style door bars in both doors, and added rocker bars on both sides. These bars are interconnected with vertical spreaders to help distribute potential loads.

In addition to the cage, Dave asked us to fabricate interior door pulls; Lexan side windows which are fastened with Dzus hardware; SFI-approved window net and cage padding; custom mirror, camera mount and helmet hook tabs; and a steering wheel quick-release. In order to maximize driver space, we removed the factory seat mounts, trimmed the floor, and fabricated new driver-side seat mounts. This allowed us to install the Racetech seat approx. 1" lower than it would have fit otherwise, providing Dave with valuable headroom. We also fabricated custom seat mounts on the passenger-side and custom lap and anti-sub belt mounts on both sides.

After all of the fabrication was completed, we re-masked the car and painted the cage using automotive paint and professional detail paint equipment. We then reinstalled the dash and installed the safety harnesses and seats.
 




Dave's Porsche Cayman S

Dave currently races a nice 911 in PCA events. However, after purchasing this brand-new Cayman S, he decided to use it for Production class racing. We feel very privileged that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to help turn his new Cayman S into a full-time race car.

While discussing the various classes in which Dave planned to race, he asked us to make this car as versatile as possible, and to build the cage to be compliant with PCA, SCCA and NASA rules. Wanting the cage to be strong and as lightweight as possible, Dave asked us to use chrom-moly tube. The final information we needed was the car's target race weight, which is just under 3,000 lbs. So, we recommended to Dave that we use TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" 4130 chrom-moly tube for the main structure/required elements of the cage, and a combination of 1.5" x .095", 1.25" x .065" and 1" x .065" chrom-moly tube for the non-required and  triangulation bars and tube gussets. This keeps the cage legal for all three sanctioning bodies, while at the same time managing weight and increasing strength with the additional bars.

To keep the cage legal for the Production class, this cage uses a 6-point design, with mounting plates for the main hoop, forward hoops and rear braces. The front of the cage is cross-braced with the required windshield bar as well as a dash bar that is fitted at the front bulkhead, just below the windshield and dash. Triangulation gussets in the forward hoop/windshield bar joints, and in the forward hoop/dash bar joints add strength in front of the driver. The rear braces are tie into the rear shock towers, with additional strengthening provided by a shock tower crossbar and additional bars connecting the shock towers with the middle of the main hoop. Dave decided not to use a triangulation bar or X-bars in the rear area, since these would have limited his rearward vision. So instead, we added triangulation bars in all four corners of the rear braces to help with chassis and cage stiffening.

After trimming the existing door openings, we built Extended-Style door bars in both doors, and added rocker bars on both sides. These bars are interconnected with vertical spreaders to help distribute potential loads.

In addition to the cage, Dave asked us to fabricate interior door pulls; Lexan side windows which are fastened with Dzus hardware; SFI-approved window net and cage padding; custom mirror, camera mount and helmet hook tabs; and a steering wheel quick-release. In order to maximize driver space, we removed the factory seat mounts, trimmed the floor, and fabricated new driver-side seat mounts. This allowed us to install the Racetech seat approx. 1" lower than it would have fit otherwise, providing Dave with valuable headroom. We also fabricated custom seat mounts on the passenger-side and custom lap and anti-sub belt mounts on both sides.

After all of the fabrication was completed, we re-masked the car and painted the cage using automotive paint and professional detail paint equipment. We then reinstalled the dash and installed the safety harnesses and seats.
 




Dave's Porsche Cayman S

Dave currently races a nice 911 in PCA events. However, after purchasing this brand-new Cayman S, he decided to use it for Production class racing. We feel very privileged that he chose Hanksville Hot Rods to help turn his new Cayman S into a full-time race car.

While discussing the various classes in which Dave planned to race, he asked us to make this car as versatile as possible, and to build the cage to be compliant with PCA, SCCA and NASA rules. Wanting the cage to be strong and as lightweight as possible, Dave asked us to use chrom-moly tube. The final information we needed was the car's target race weight, which is just under 3,000 lbs. So, we recommended to Dave that we use TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" 4130 chrom-moly tube for the main structure/required elements of the cage, and a combination of 1.5" x .095", 1.25" x .065" and 1" x .065" chrom-moly tube for the non-required and  triangulation bars and tube gussets. This keeps the cage legal for all three sanctioning bodies, while at the same time managing weight and increasing strength with the additional bars.

To keep the cage legal for the Production class, this cage uses a 6-point design, with mounting plates for the main hoop, forward hoops and rear braces. The front of the cage is cross-braced with the required windshield bar as well as a dash bar that is fitted at the front bulkhead, just below the windshield and dash. Triangulation gussets in the forward hoop/windshield bar joints, and in the forward hoop/dash bar joints add strength in front of the driver. The rear braces are tie into the rear shock towers, with additional strengthening provided by a shock tower crossbar and additional bars connecting the shock towers with the middle of the main hoop. Dave decided not to use a triangulation bar or X-bars in the rear area, since these would have limited his rearward vision. So instead, we added triangulation bars in all four corners of the rear braces to help with chassis and cage stiffening.

After trimming the existing door openings, we built Extended-Style door bars in both doors, and added rocker bars on both sides. These bars are interconnected with vertical spreaders to help distribute potential loads.

In addition to the cage, Dave asked us to fabricate interior door pulls; Lexan side windows which are fastened with Dzus hardware; SFI-approved window net and cage padding; custom mirror, camera mount and helmet hook tabs; and a steering wheel quick-release. In order to maximize driver space, we removed the factory seat mounts, trimmed the floor, and fabricated new driver-side seat mounts. This allowed us to install the Racetech seat approx. 1" lower than it would have fit otherwise, providing Dave with valuable headroom. We also fabricated custom seat mounts on the passenger-side and custom lap and anti-sub belt mounts on both sides.

After all of the fabrication was completed, we re-masked the car and painted the cage using automotive paint and professional detail paint equipment. We then reinstalled the dash and installed the safety harnesses and seats.
 





Robert's 911SC

Robert drove his 911 from Steamboat Springs to have us build his cage. This will be a combination street/track car for awhile, so he decided not to have door bars installed at this time. We did install rocker bars, fitted low and tight to the body at the bottom of the door openings, to provide some side-impact protection and to help stiffen the chassis.

This cage uses the same design as our mail-order 911 cage design, with the main hoop fitted high and touching the roof corners; forward hoops fitted high and touching the roofline; and a tight fit against the dash corners. Since Robert chose to retain his factory dash sheetmetal, we fitted the dash bar along the bottom of the dash. In addition to the cage, we fabricated a custom lowered seat mount on the driver-side, welded window net tabs and patched several holes on the front bulkhead.

With its new 1973 Porsche Viper Green interior paint and its awesome new cage, we can't wait to see this car on the track during the 2013 season!


Robert's 911SC

Robert drove his 911 from Steamboat Springs to have us build his cage. This will be a combination street/track car for awhile, so he decided not to have door bars installed at this time. We did install rocker bars, fitted low and tight to the body at the bottom of the door openings, to provide some side-impact protection and to help stiffen the chassis.

This cage uses the same design as our mail-order 911 cage design, with the main hoop fitted high and touching the roof corners; forward hoops fitted high and touching the roofline; and a tight fit against the dash corners. Since Robert chose to retain his factory dash sheetmetal, we fitted the dash bar along the bottom of the dash. In addition to the cage, we fabricated a custom lowered seat mount on the driver-side, welded window net tabs and patched several holes on the front bulkhead.

With its new 1973 Porsche Viper Green interior paint and its awesome new cage, we can't wait to see this car on the track during the 2013 season!


Robert's 911SC

Robert drove his 911 from Steamboat Springs to have us build his cage. This will be a combination street/track car for awhile, so he decided not to have door bars installed at this time. We did install rocker bars, fitted low and tight to the body at the bottom of the door openings, to provide some side-impact protection and to help stiffen the chassis.

This cage uses the same design as our mail-order 911 cage design, with the main hoop fitted high and touching the roof corners; forward hoops fitted high and touching the roofline; and a tight fit against the dash corners. Since Robert chose to retain his factory dash sheetmetal, we fitted the dash bar along the bottom of the dash. In addition to the cage, we fabricated a custom lowered seat mount on the driver-side, welded window net tabs and patched several holes on the front bulkhead.

With its new 1973 Porsche Viper Green interior paint and its awesome new cage, we can't wait to see this car on the track during the 2013 season!


Robert's 911SC

Robert drove his 911 from Steamboat Springs to have us build his cage. This will be a combination street/track car for awhile, so he decided not to have door bars installed at this time. We did install rocker bars, fitted low and tight to the body at the bottom of the door openings, to provide some side-impact protection and to help stiffen the chassis.

This cage uses the same design as our mail-order 911 cage design, with the main hoop fitted high and touching the roof corners; forward hoops fitted high and touching the roofline; and a tight fit against the dash corners. Since Robert chose to retain his factory dash sheetmetal, we fitted the dash bar along the bottom of the dash. In addition to the cage, we fabricated a custom lowered seat mount on the driver-side, welded window net tabs and patched several holes on the front bulkhead.

With its new 1973 Porsche Viper Green interior paint and its awesome new cage, we can't wait to see this car on the track during the 2013 season!


Robert's 911SC

Robert drove his 911 from Steamboat Springs to have us build his cage. This will be a combination street/track car for awhile, so he decided not to have door bars installed at this time. We did install rocker bars, fitted low and tight to the body at the bottom of the door openings, to provide some side-impact protection and to help stiffen the chassis.

This cage uses the same design as our mail-order 911 cage design, with the main hoop fitted high and touching the roof corners; forward hoops fitted high and touching the roofline; and a tight fit against the dash corners. Since Robert chose to retain his factory dash sheetmetal, we fitted the dash bar along the bottom of the dash. In addition to the cage, we fabricated a custom lowered seat mount on the driver-side, welded window net tabs and patched several holes on the front bulkhead.

With its new 1973 Porsche Viper Green interior paint and its awesome new cage, we can't wait to see this car on the track during the 2013 season!


Robert's 911SC

Robert drove his 911 from Steamboat Springs to have us build his cage. This will be a combination street/track car for awhile, so he decided not to have door bars installed at this time. We did install rocker bars, fitted low and tight to the body at the bottom of the door openings, to provide some side-impact protection and to help stiffen the chassis.

This cage uses the same design as our mail-order 911 cage design, with the main hoop fitted high and touching the roof corners; forward hoops fitted high and touching the roofline; and a tight fit against the dash corners. Since Robert chose to retain his factory dash sheetmetal, we fitted the dash bar along the bottom of the dash. In addition to the cage, we fabricated a custom lowered seat mount on the driver-side, welded window net tabs and patched several holes on the front bulkhead.

With its new 1973 Porsche Viper Green interior paint and its awesome new cage, we can't wait to see this car on the track during the 2013 season!


Robert's 911SC

Robert drove his 911 from Steamboat Springs to have us build his cage. This will be a combination street/track car for awhile, so he decided not to have door bars installed at this time. We did install rocker bars, fitted low and tight to the body at the bottom of the door openings, to provide some side-impact protection and to help stiffen the chassis.

This cage uses the same design as our mail-order 911 cage design, with the main hoop fitted high and touching the roof corners; forward hoops fitted high and touching the roofline; and a tight fit against the dash corners. Since Robert chose to retain his factory dash sheetmetal, we fitted the dash bar along the bottom of the dash. In addition to the cage, we fabricated a custom lowered seat mount on the driver-side, welded window net tabs and patched several holes on the front bulkhead.

With its new 1973 Porsche Viper Green interior paint and its awesome new cage, we can't wait to see this car on the track during the 2013 season!


Robert's 911SC

Robert drove his 911 from Steamboat Springs to have us build his cage. This will be a combination street/track car for awhile, so he decided not to have door bars installed at this time. We did install rocker bars, fitted low and tight to the body at the bottom of the door openings, to provide some side-impact protection and to help stiffen the chassis.

This cage uses the same design as our mail-order 911 cage design, with the main hoop fitted high and touching the roof corners; forward hoops fitted high and touching the roofline; and a tight fit against the dash corners. Since Robert chose to retain his factory dash sheetmetal, we fitted the dash bar along the bottom of the dash. In addition to the cage, we fabricated a custom lowered seat mount on the driver-side, welded window net tabs and patched several holes on the front bulkhead.

With its new 1973 Porsche Viper Green interior paint and its awesome new cage, we can't wait to see this car on the track during the 2013 season!


Robert's 911SC

Robert drove his 911 from Steamboat Springs to have us build his cage. This will be a combination street/track car for awhile, so he decided not to have door bars installed at this time. We did install rocker bars, fitted low and tight to the body at the bottom of the door openings, to provide some side-impact protection and to help stiffen the chassis.

This cage uses the same design as our mail-order 911 cage design, with the main hoop fitted high and touching the roof corners; forward hoops fitted high and touching the roofline; and a tight fit against the dash corners. Since Robert chose to retain his factory dash sheetmetal, we fitted the dash bar along the bottom of the dash. In addition to the cage, we fabricated a custom lowered seat mount on the driver-side, welded window net tabs and patched several holes on the front bulkhead.

With its new 1973 Porsche Viper Green interior paint and its awesome new cage, we can't wait to see this car on the track during the 2013 season!


Robert's 911SC

Robert drove his 911 from Steamboat Springs to have us build his cage. This will be a combination street/track car for awhile, so he decided not to have door bars installed at this time. We did install rocker bars, fitted low and tight to the body at the bottom of the door openings, to provide some side-impact protection and to help stiffen the chassis.

This cage uses the same design as our mail-order 911 cage design, with the main hoop fitted high and touching the roof corners; forward hoops fitted high and touching the roofline; and a tight fit against the dash corners. Since Robert chose to retain his factory dash sheetmetal, we fitted the dash bar along the bottom of the dash. In addition to the cage, we fabricated a custom lowered seat mount on the driver-side, welded window net tabs and patched several holes on the front bulkhead.

With its new 1973 Porsche Viper Green interior paint and its awesome new cage, we can't wait to see this car on the track during the 2013 season!


Robert's 911SC

Robert drove his 911 from Steamboat Springs to have us build his cage. This will be a combination street/track car for awhile, so he decided not to have door bars installed at this time. We did install rocker bars, fitted low and tight to the body at the bottom of the door openings, to provide some side-impact protection and to help stiffen the chassis.

This cage uses the same design as our mail-order 911 cage design, with the main hoop fitted high and touching the roof corners; forward hoops fitted high and touching the roofline; and a tight fit against the dash corners. Since Robert chose to retain his factory dash sheetmetal, we fitted the dash bar along the bottom of the dash. In addition to the cage, we fabricated a custom lowered seat mount on the driver-side, welded window net tabs and patched several holes on the front bulkhead.

With its new 1973 Porsche Viper Green interior paint and its awesome new cage, we can't wait to see this car on the track during the 2013 season!


Robert's 911SC

Robert drove his 911 from Steamboat Springs to have us build his cage. This will be a combination street/track car for awhile, so he decided not to have door bars installed at this time. We did install rocker bars, fitted low and tight to the body at the bottom of the door openings, to provide some side-impact protection and to help stiffen the chassis.

This cage uses the same design as our mail-order 911 cage design, with the main hoop fitted high and touching the roof corners; forward hoops fitted high and touching the roofline; and a tight fit against the dash corners. Since Robert chose to retain his factory dash sheetmetal, we fitted the dash bar along the bottom of the dash. In addition to the cage, we fabricated a custom lowered seat mount on the driver-side, welded window net tabs and patched several holes on the front bulkhead.

With its new 1973 Porsche Viper Green interior paint and its awesome new cage, we can't wait to see this car on the track during the 2013 season!


Robert's 911SC

Robert drove his 911 from Steamboat Springs to have us build his cage. This will be a combination street/track car for awhile, so he decided not to have door bars installed at this time. We did install rocker bars, fitted low and tight to the body at the bottom of the door openings, to provide some side-impact protection and to help stiffen the chassis.

This cage uses the same design as our mail-order 911 cage design, with the main hoop fitted high and touching the roof corners; forward hoops fitted high and touching the roofline; and a tight fit against the dash corners. Since Robert chose to retain his factory dash sheetmetal, we fitted the dash bar along the bottom of the dash. In addition to the cage, we fabricated a custom lowered seat mount on the driver-side, welded window net tabs and patched several holes on the front bulkhead.

With its new 1973 Porsche Viper Green interior paint and its awesome new cage, we can't wait to see this car on the track during the 2013 season!


Matt's Porsche 911

We met Matt at a NASA event at Pueblo Motorsports Park. He had recently purchased this very clean '89 911 and was interested in turning it into a full race car for PCA and NASA GTS racing. After conferring with Matt and discussing various cage design options, he asked us to build a full cage with tube extensions into the front trunk and rear engine areas. He also asked us to perform other race car fabrication projects. Matt also conferred with Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who gave us insights into how he would set-up the suspension and how we could tie the cage into the suspension points to help maximize chassis performance.

The cage is made from 1.5" x .095" DOM mild steel tube. In addition to the standard 6 mounting points, this 911 features Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars and rocker bars on both sides; a custom-fitted dash bar that is routed around the factory windshield wiper mechanism; rear brace X-bars that are tied-into a custom-bent rear shock tower crossbar and tube gussets; a nice-fitting roof bar; front strut tower connector that is tied-into the dash bar; and a fuel cell cage that extends forward from the strut tower connector, is welded to the tub sides and connects to the floor in the front of the trunk.

Additional fabrication included fitment of the fuel cell; fabrication of custom seat mounts and installation of the race seat; installation of a quick-release steering wheel; fabrication of custom harness mounts; installation of the window net and power cutoff switch; removal of the door interior sheetmetal to accomodate the Extended-Style door bars; various tube and plate gussets to tie the cage into the body; fabrication of an aluminum front bulkhead in preparation for the aftermarket dash; removal of the sunroof; installation of SFI-certified cage padding; and stripping and painting the interior, trunk and cage.

This was a large project that required much detail-oriented work. We can't wait to see this car at the track!
 


Matt's Porsche 911

We met Matt at a NASA event at Pueblo Motorsports Park. He had recently purchased this very clean '89 911 and was interested in turning it into a full race car for PCA and NASA GTS racing. After conferring with Matt and discussing various cage design options, he asked us to build a full cage with tube extensions into the front trunk and rear engine areas. He also asked us to perform other race car fabrication projects. Matt also conferred with Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who gave us insights into how he would set-up the suspension and how we could tie the cage into the suspension points to help maximize chassis performance.

The cage is made from 1.5" x .095" DOM mild steel tube. In addition to the standard 6 mounting points, this 911 features Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars and rocker bars on both sides; a custom-fitted dash bar that is routed around the factory windshield wiper mechanism; rear brace X-bars that are tied-into a custom-bent rear shock tower crossbar and tube gussets; a nice-fitting roof bar; front strut tower connector that is tied-into the dash bar; and a fuel cell cage that extends forward from the strut tower connector, is welded to the tub sides and connects to the floor in the front of the trunk.

Additional fabrication included fitment of the fuel cell; fabrication of custom seat mounts and installation of the race seat; installation of a quick-release steering wheel; fabrication of custom harness mounts; installation of the window net and power cutoff switch; removal of the door interior sheetmetal to accomodate the Extended-Style door bars; various tube and plate gussets to tie the cage into the body; fabrication of an aluminum front bulkhead in preparation for the aftermarket dash; removal of the sunroof; installation of SFI-certified cage padding; and stripping and painting the interior, trunk and cage.

This was a large project that required much detail-oriented work. We can't wait to see this car at the track!
 


Matt's Porsche 911

We met Matt at a NASA event at Pueblo Motorsports Park. He had recently purchased this very clean '89 911 and was interested in turning it into a full race car for PCA and NASA GTS racing. After conferring with Matt and discussing various cage design options, he asked us to build a full cage with tube extensions into the front trunk and rear engine areas. He also asked us to perform other race car fabrication projects. Matt also conferred with Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who gave us insights into how he would set-up the suspension and how we could tie the cage into the suspension points to help maximize chassis performance.

The cage is made from 1.5" x .095" DOM mild steel tube. In addition to the standard 6 mounting points, this 911 features Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars and rocker bars on both sides; a custom-fitted dash bar that is routed around the factory windshield wiper mechanism; rear brace X-bars that are tied-into a custom-bent rear shock tower crossbar and tube gussets; a nice-fitting roof bar; front strut tower connector that is tied-into the dash bar; and a fuel cell cage that extends forward from the strut tower connector, is welded to the tub sides and connects to the floor in the front of the trunk.

Additional fabrication included fitment of the fuel cell; fabrication of custom seat mounts and installation of the race seat; installation of a quick-release steering wheel; fabrication of custom harness mounts; installation of the window net and power cutoff switch; removal of the door interior sheetmetal to accomodate the Extended-Style door bars; various tube and plate gussets to tie the cage into the body; fabrication of an aluminum front bulkhead in preparation for the aftermarket dash; removal of the sunroof; installation of SFI-certified cage padding; and stripping and painting the interior, trunk and cage.

This was a large project that required much detail-oriented work. We can't wait to see this car at the track!
 


Matt's Porsche 911

We met Matt at a NASA event at Pueblo Motorsports Park. He had recently purchased this very clean '89 911 and was interested in turning it into a full race car for PCA and NASA GTS racing. After conferring with Matt and discussing various cage design options, he asked us to build a full cage with tube extensions into the front trunk and rear engine areas. He also asked us to perform other race car fabrication projects. Matt also conferred with Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who gave us insights into how he would set-up the suspension and how we could tie the cage into the suspension points to help maximize chassis performance.

The cage is made from 1.5" x .095" DOM mild steel tube. In addition to the standard 6 mounting points, this 911 features Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars and rocker bars on both sides; a custom-fitted dash bar that is routed around the factory windshield wiper mechanism; rear brace X-bars that are tied-into a custom-bent rear shock tower crossbar and tube gussets; a nice-fitting roof bar; front strut tower connector that is tied-into the dash bar; and a fuel cell cage that extends forward from the strut tower connector, is welded to the tub sides and connects to the floor in the front of the trunk.

Additional fabrication included fitment of the fuel cell; fabrication of custom seat mounts and installation of the race seat; installation of a quick-release steering wheel; fabrication of custom harness mounts; installation of the window net and power cutoff switch; removal of the door interior sheetmetal to accomodate the Extended-Style door bars; various tube and plate gussets to tie the cage into the body; fabrication of an aluminum front bulkhead in preparation for the aftermarket dash; removal of the sunroof; installation of SFI-certified cage padding; and stripping and painting the interior, trunk and cage.

This was a large project that required much detail-oriented work. We can't wait to see this car at the track!
 


Matt's Porsche 911

We met Matt at a NASA event at Pueblo Motorsports Park. He had recently purchased this very clean '89 911 and was interested in turning it into a full race car for PCA and NASA GTS racing. After conferring with Matt and discussing various cage design options, he asked us to build a full cage with tube extensions into the front trunk and rear engine areas. He also asked us to perform other race car fabrication projects. Matt also conferred with Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who gave us insights into how he would set-up the suspension and how we could tie the cage into the suspension points to help maximize chassis performance.

The cage is made from 1.5" x .095" DOM mild steel tube. In addition to the standard 6 mounting points, this 911 features Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars and rocker bars on both sides; a custom-fitted dash bar that is routed around the factory windshield wiper mechanism; rear brace X-bars that are tied-into a custom-bent rear shock tower crossbar and tube gussets; a nice-fitting roof bar; front strut tower connector that is tied-into the dash bar; and a fuel cell cage that extends forward from the strut tower connector, is welded to the tub sides and connects to the floor in the front of the trunk.

Additional fabrication included fitment of the fuel cell; fabrication of custom seat mounts and installation of the race seat; installation of a quick-release steering wheel; fabrication of custom harness mounts; installation of the window net and power cutoff switch; removal of the door interior sheetmetal to accomodate the Extended-Style door bars; various tube and plate gussets to tie the cage into the body; fabrication of an aluminum front bulkhead in preparation for the aftermarket dash; removal of the sunroof; installation of SFI-certified cage padding; and stripping and painting the interior, trunk and cage.

This was a large project that required much detail-oriented work. We can't wait to see this car at the track!
 


Matt's Porsche 911

We met Matt at a NASA event at Pueblo Motorsports Park. He had recently purchased this very clean '89 911 and was interested in turning it into a full race car for PCA and NASA GTS racing. After conferring with Matt and discussing various cage design options, he asked us to build a full cage with tube extensions into the front trunk and rear engine areas. He also asked us to perform other race car fabrication projects. Matt also conferred with Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who gave us insights into how he would set-up the suspension and how we could tie the cage into the suspension points to help maximize chassis performance.

The cage is made from 1.5" x .095" DOM mild steel tube. In addition to the standard 6 mounting points, this 911 features Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars and rocker bars on both sides; a custom-fitted dash bar that is routed around the factory windshield wiper mechanism; rear brace X-bars that are tied-into a custom-bent rear shock tower crossbar and tube gussets; a nice-fitting roof bar; front strut tower connector that is tied-into the dash bar; and a fuel cell cage that extends forward from the strut tower connector, is welded to the tub sides and connects to the floor in the front of the trunk.

Additional fabrication included fitment of the fuel cell; fabrication of custom seat mounts and installation of the race seat; installation of a quick-release steering wheel; fabrication of custom harness mounts; installation of the window net and power cutoff switch; removal of the door interior sheetmetal to accomodate the Extended-Style door bars; various tube and plate gussets to tie the cage into the body; fabrication of an aluminum front bulkhead in preparation for the aftermarket dash; removal of the sunroof; installation of SFI-certified cage padding; and stripping and painting the interior, trunk and cage.

This was a large project that required much detail-oriented work. We can't wait to see this car at the track!
 


Matt's Porsche 911

We met Matt at a NASA event at Pueblo Motorsports Park. He had recently purchased this very clean '89 911 and was interested in turning it into a full race car for PCA and NASA GTS racing. After conferring with Matt and discussing various cage design options, he asked us to build a full cage with tube extensions into the front trunk and rear engine areas. He also asked us to perform other race car fabrication projects. Matt also conferred with Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who gave us insights into how he would set-up the suspension and how we could tie the cage into the suspension points to help maximize chassis performance.

The cage is made from 1.5" x .095" DOM mild steel tube. In addition to the standard 6 mounting points, this 911 features Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars and rocker bars on both sides; a custom-fitted dash bar that is routed around the factory windshield wiper mechanism; rear brace X-bars that are tied-into a custom-bent rear shock tower crossbar and tube gussets; a nice-fitting roof bar; front strut tower connector that is tied-into the dash bar; and a fuel cell cage that extends forward from the strut tower connector, is welded to the tub sides and connects to the floor in the front of the trunk.

Additional fabrication included fitment of the fuel cell; fabrication of custom seat mounts and installation of the race seat; installation of a quick-release steering wheel; fabrication of custom harness mounts; installation of the window net and power cutoff switch; removal of the door interior sheetmetal to accomodate the Extended-Style door bars; various tube and plate gussets to tie the cage into the body; fabrication of an aluminum front bulkhead in preparation for the aftermarket dash; removal of the sunroof; installation of SFI-certified cage padding; and stripping and painting the interior, trunk and cage.

This was a large project that required much detail-oriented work. We can't wait to see this car at the track!
 


Matt's Porsche 911

We met Matt at a NASA event at Pueblo Motorsports Park. He had recently purchased this very clean '89 911 and was interested in turning it into a full race car for PCA and NASA GTS racing. After conferring with Matt and discussing various cage design options, he asked us to build a full cage with tube extensions into the front trunk and rear engine areas. He also asked us to perform other race car fabrication projects. Matt also conferred with Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who gave us insights into how he would set-up the suspension and how we could tie the cage into the suspension points to help maximize chassis performance.

The cage is made from 1.5" x .095" DOM mild steel tube. In addition to the standard 6 mounting points, this 911 features Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars and rocker bars on both sides; a custom-fitted dash bar that is routed around the factory windshield wiper mechanism; rear brace X-bars that are tied-into a custom-bent rear shock tower crossbar and tube gussets; a nice-fitting roof bar; front strut tower connector that is tied-into the dash bar; and a fuel cell cage that extends forward from the strut tower connector, is welded to the tub sides and connects to the floor in the front of the trunk.

Additional fabrication included fitment of the fuel cell; fabrication of custom seat mounts and installation of the race seat; installation of a quick-release steering wheel; fabrication of custom harness mounts; installation of the window net and power cutoff switch; removal of the door interior sheetmetal to accomodate the Extended-Style door bars; various tube and plate gussets to tie the cage into the body; fabrication of an aluminum front bulkhead in preparation for the aftermarket dash; removal of the sunroof; installation of SFI-certified cage padding; and stripping and painting the interior, trunk and cage.

This was a large project that required much detail-oriented work. We can't wait to see this car at the track!
 


Matt's Porsche 911

We met Matt at a NASA event at Pueblo Motorsports Park. He had recently purchased this very clean '89 911 and was interested in turning it into a full race car for PCA and NASA GTS racing. After conferring with Matt and discussing various cage design options, he asked us to build a full cage with tube extensions into the front trunk and rear engine areas. He also asked us to perform other race car fabrication projects. Matt also conferred with Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who gave us insights into how he would set-up the suspension and how we could tie the cage into the suspension points to help maximize chassis performance.

The cage is made from 1.5" x .095" DOM mild steel tube. In addition to the standard 6 mounting points, this 911 features Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars and rocker bars on both sides; a custom-fitted dash bar that is routed around the factory windshield wiper mechanism; rear brace X-bars that are tied-into a custom-bent rear shock tower crossbar and tube gussets; a nice-fitting roof bar; front strut tower connector that is tied-into the dash bar; and a fuel cell cage that extends forward from the strut tower connector, is welded to the tub sides and connects to the floor in the front of the trunk.

Additional fabrication included fitment of the fuel cell; fabrication of custom seat mounts and installation of the race seat; installation of a quick-release steering wheel; fabrication of custom harness mounts; installation of the window net and power cutoff switch; removal of the door interior sheetmetal to accomodate the Extended-Style door bars; various tube and plate gussets to tie the cage into the body; fabrication of an aluminum front bulkhead in preparation for the aftermarket dash; removal of the sunroof; installation of SFI-certified cage padding; and stripping and painting the interior, trunk and cage.

This was a large project that required much detail-oriented work. We can't wait to see this car at the track!
 


Matt's Porsche 911

We met Matt at a NASA event at Pueblo Motorsports Park. He had recently purchased this very clean '89 911 and was interested in turning it into a full race car for PCA and NASA GTS racing. After conferring with Matt and discussing various cage design options, he asked us to build a full cage with tube extensions into the front trunk and rear engine areas. He also asked us to perform other race car fabrication projects. Matt also conferred with Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who gave us insights into how he would set-up the suspension and how we could tie the cage into the suspension points to help maximize chassis performance.

The cage is made from 1.5" x .095" DOM mild steel tube. In addition to the standard 6 mounting points, this 911 features Hanksville's Extended-Style door bars and rocker bars on both sides; a custom-fitted dash bar that is routed around the factory windshield wiper mechanism; rear brace X-bars that are tied-into a custom-bent rear shock tower crossbar and tube gussets; a nice-fitting roof bar; front strut tower connector that is tied-into the dash bar; and a fuel cell cage that extends forward from the strut tower connector, is welded to the tub sides and connects to the floor in the front of the trunk.

Additional fabrication included fitment of the fuel cell; fabrication of custom seat mounts and installation of the race seat; installation of a quick-release steering wheel; fabrication of custom harness mounts; installation of the window net and power cutoff switch; removal of the door interior sheetmetal to accomodate the Extended-Style door bars; various tube and plate gussets to tie the cage into the body; fabrication of an aluminum front bulkhead in preparation for the aftermarket dash; removal of the sunroof; installation of SFI-certified cage padding; and stripping and painting the interior, trunk and cage.

This was a large project that required much detail-oriented work. We can't wait to see this car at the track!
 



Alan's Porsche 911 RSR

Alan's '75 911 is an authentic RSR with full documentation; #11 of 12 factory RSR race cars built that year. The existing cage did not fit well inside the cabin, and Alan was not comfortable with it. Having heard about Hanksville's reputation for quality and fit, Steve Rowe from Rowe Performance brought the car to us for a new cage. 

This cage uses 1.5" x .095" DOM tubes, which were TIG welded for the highest quality and appearance. Alan chose to use X-style door bars, which provide considerable strength without the need to cut into the door sheetmetal. To provide additional strength in the door area, we added vertical spreaders that extend downward to 1/8" mounting plates welded to the rocker sills. This cage also features a lower dash bar and a diagonal roof bar, and we extended the cage forward to tie-into the front towers. The rear braces are tied-into the rear shock towers with short sections of tube; the shock towers were partially wrapped with 1/8" mounting plates for additional rigidity.

After the car was finished, it was raced at the 2010 Monterey Historics. We are very appreciative that Hanksville was chosen to help with this rare car. Thank you, Alan and Steve!
 

Alan's Porsche 911 RSR

Alan's '75 911 is an authentic RSR with full documentation; #11 of 12 factory RSR race cars built that year. The existing cage did not fit well inside the cabin, and Alan was not comfortable with it. Having heard about Hanksville's reputation for quality and fit, Steve Rowe from Rowe Performance brought the car to us for a new cage. 

This cage uses 1.5" x .095" DOM tubes, which were TIG welded for the highest quality and appearance. Alan chose to use X-style door bars, which provide considerable strength without the need to cut into the door sheetmetal. To provide additional strength in the door area, we added vertical spreaders that extend downward to 1/8" mounting plates welded to the rocker sills. This cage also features a lower dash bar and a diagonal roof bar, and we extended the cage forward to tie-into the front towers. The rear braces are tied-into the rear shock towers with short sections of tube; the shock towers were partially wrapped with 1/8" mounting plates for additional rigidity.

After the car was finished, it was raced at the 2010 Monterey Historics. We are very appreciative that Hanksville was chosen to help with this rare car. Thank you, Alan and Steve!
 

Alan's Porsche 911 RSR

Alan's '75 911 is an authentic RSR with full documentation; #11 of 12 factory RSR race cars built that year. The existing cage did not fit well inside the cabin, and Alan was not comfortable with it. Having heard about Hanksville's reputation for quality and fit, Steve Rowe from Rowe Performance brought the car to us for a new cage. 

This cage uses 1.5" x .095" DOM tubes, which were TIG welded for the highest quality and appearance. Alan chose to use X-style door bars, which provide considerable strength without the need to cut into the door sheetmetal. To provide additional strength in the door area, we added vertical spreaders that extend downward to 1/8" mounting plates welded to the rocker sills. This cage also features a lower dash bar and a diagonal roof bar, and we extended the cage forward to tie-into the front towers. The rear braces are tied-into the rear shock towers with short sections of tube; the shock towers were partially wrapped with 1/8" mounting plates for additional rigidity.

After the car was finished, it was raced at the 2010 Monterey Historics. We are very appreciative that Hanksville was chosen to help with this rare car. Thank you, Alan and Steve!
 

Alan's Porsche 911 RSR

Alan's '75 911 is an authentic RSR with full documentation; #11 of 12 factory RSR race cars built that year. The existing cage did not fit well inside the cabin, and Alan was not comfortable with it. Having heard about Hanksville's reputation for quality and fit, Steve Rowe from Rowe Performance brought the car to us for a new cage. 

This cage uses 1.5" x .095" DOM tubes, which were TIG welded for the highest quality and appearance. Alan chose to use X-style door bars, which provide considerable strength without the need to cut into the door sheetmetal. To provide additional strength in the door area, we added vertical spreaders that extend downward to 1/8" mounting plates welded to the rocker sills. This cage also features a lower dash bar and a diagonal roof bar, and we extended the cage forward to tie-into the front towers. The rear braces are tied-into the rear shock towers with short sections of tube; the shock towers were partially wrapped with 1/8" mounting plates for additional rigidity.

After the car was finished, it was raced at the 2010 Monterey Historics. We are very appreciative that Hanksville was chosen to help with this rare car. Thank you, Alan and Steve!
 

Alan's Porsche 911 RSR

Alan's '75 911 is an authentic RSR with full documentation; #11 of 12 factory RSR race cars built that year. The existing cage did not fit well inside the cabin, and Alan was not comfortable with it. Having heard about Hanksville's reputation for quality and fit, Steve Rowe from Rowe Performance brought the car to us for a new cage. 

This cage uses 1.5" x .095" DOM tubes, which were TIG welded for the highest quality and appearance. Alan chose to use X-style door bars, which provide considerable strength without the need to cut into the door sheetmetal. To provide additional strength in the door area, we added vertical spreaders that extend downward to 1/8" mounting plates welded to the rocker sills. This cage also features a lower dash bar and a diagonal roof bar, and we extended the cage forward to tie-into the front towers. The rear braces are tied-into the rear shock towers with short sections of tube; the shock towers were partially wrapped with 1/8" mounting plates for additional rigidity.

After the car was finished, it was raced at the 2010 Monterey Historics. We are very appreciative that Hanksville was chosen to help with this rare car. Thank you, Alan and Steve!
 

Alan's Porsche 911 RSR

Alan's '75 911 is an authentic RSR with full documentation; #11 of 12 factory RSR race cars built that year. The existing cage did not fit well inside the cabin, and Alan was not comfortable with it. Having heard about Hanksville's reputation for quality and fit, Steve Rowe from Rowe Performance brought the car to us for a new cage. 

This cage uses 1.5" x .095" DOM tubes, which were TIG welded for the highest quality and appearance. Alan chose to use X-style door bars, which provide considerable strength without the need to cut into the door sheetmetal. To provide additional strength in the door area, we added vertical spreaders that extend downward to 1/8" mounting plates welded to the rocker sills. This cage also features a lower dash bar and a diagonal roof bar, and we extended the cage forward to tie-into the front towers. The rear braces are tied-into the rear shock towers with short sections of tube; the shock towers were partially wrapped with 1/8" mounting plates for additional rigidity.

After the car was finished, it was raced at the 2010 Monterey Historics. We are very appreciative that Hanksville was chosen to help with this rare car. Thank you, Alan and Steve!
 

Robert’s Porsche 911 RSR

We had met Robert at the races, where he was driving his nicely-prepared RSR. This car had been raced on the east coast, and had logged miles at Sebring. After the season ended, he called to tell us that he wanted to bring the car in for some cage and sheetmetal work. After discussing his needs at length, we developed a plan of action with Robert.

The cage was an older design, and had issues passing tech: it had areas where the tubes were not fully welded, the main hoop had too many bends, and the rear braces were bent (all of which are not legal for racing in many popular sanctioning bodies and race classes). So, Robert asked us to remove the old cage and fabricate a new Hanksville cage.

Since this had been a race car for many years, prior owners had drilled many holes in the car. Robert asked us to fill these holes to give the car a cleaner look and to make it safer. He also asked us to weld new seat mounts, install an oil cooler and fabricate an air vent/shroud for the cooler, to remove part of the rear sheetmetal and to fabricate an aluminum access panel. We also removed the stock dash and fitted a carbon fiber replacement dash.

This cage features our Extended-style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door area, actually touching the inside of the fiberglass door. The passenger-side door bars use an X-design. Both doors have rocker bars that are connected to the door bars and are also welded to the rockers with 1/8" tabs. In addition to the straight rear braces, the rear of the cage has X-bars that connect to the rear shock towers. The windshield bar is bent to tuck high up under the windshield, forward and out of the driver's vision. We connected the steering column to the dash bar to add strength in that area, since the factory dash had been removed.

Up front, we removed the factory strut towers and welded aftermarket parts. We then added a tube structure in the front of the car to encapsulate the fuel cell. This structure is attached to the chassis via 1/8" mounting plates. This structure also ties into the front strut towers for additional chassis stiffening.

We started work on this car the same day that Robert had scheduled to drop his car off at Hanksville. This project took only 3 weeks to complete, and allowed Robert to take his 911 to the body shop on schedule to have the car repainted. At Hanksville, a core part of our customer service is to schedule our work realistically, to make good progress on the customer's project, and to keep customers updated on progress. Robert was happy with the results, and we can't wait to see his new, improved car at the track this season. Thanks, Robert!
 




Robert’s Porsche 911 RSR

We had met Robert at the races, where he was driving his nicely-prepared RSR. This car had been raced on the east coast, and had logged miles at Sebring. After the season ended, he called to tell us that he wanted to bring the car in for some cage and sheetmetal work. After discussing his needs at length, we developed a plan of action with Robert.

The cage was an older design, and had issues passing tech: it had areas where the tubes were not fully welded, the main hoop had too many bends, and the rear braces were bent (all of which are not legal for racing in many popular sanctioning bodies and race classes). So, Robert asked us to remove the old cage and fabricate a new Hanksville cage.

Since this had been a race car for many years, prior owners had drilled many holes in the car. Robert asked us to fill these holes to give the car a cleaner look and to make it safer. He also asked us to weld new seat mounts, install an oil cooler and fabricate an air vent/shroud for the cooler, to remove part of the rear sheetmetal and to fabricate an aluminum access panel. We also removed the stock dash and fitted a carbon fiber replacement dash.

This cage features our Extended-style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door area, actually touching the inside of the fiberglass door. The passenger-side door bars use an X-design. Both doors have rocker bars that are connected to the door bars and are also welded to the rockers with 1/8" tabs. In addition to the straight rear braces, the rear of the cage has X-bars that connect to the rear shock towers. The windshield bar is bent to tuck high up under the windshield, forward and out of the driver's vision. We connected the steering column to the dash bar to add strength in that area, since the factory dash had been removed.

Up front, we removed the factory strut towers and welded aftermarket parts. We then added a tube structure in the front of the car to encapsulate the fuel cell. This structure is attached to the chassis via 1/8" mounting plates. This structure also ties into the front strut towers for additional chassis stiffening.

We started work on this car the same day that Robert had scheduled to drop his car off at Hanksville. This project took only 3 weeks to complete, and allowed Robert to take his 911 to the body shop on schedule to have the car repainted. At Hanksville, a core part of our customer service is to schedule our work realistically, to make good progress on the customer's project, and to keep customers updated on progress. Robert was happy with the results, and we can't wait to see his new, improved car at the track this season. Thanks, Robert!
 




Robert’s Porsche 911 RSR

We had met Robert at the races, where he was driving his nicely-prepared RSR. This car had been raced on the east coast, and had logged miles at Sebring. After the season ended, he called to tell us that he wanted to bring the car in for some cage and sheetmetal work. After discussing his needs at length, we developed a plan of action with Robert.

The cage was an older design, and had issues passing tech: it had areas where the tubes were not fully welded, the main hoop had too many bends, and the rear braces were bent (all of which are not legal for racing in many popular sanctioning bodies and race classes). So, Robert asked us to remove the old cage and fabricate a new Hanksville cage.

Since this had been a race car for many years, prior owners had drilled many holes in the car. Robert asked us to fill these holes to give the car a cleaner look and to make it safer. He also asked us to weld new seat mounts, install an oil cooler and fabricate an air vent/shroud for the cooler, to remove part of the rear sheetmetal and to fabricate an aluminum access panel. We also removed the stock dash and fitted a carbon fiber replacement dash.

This cage features our Extended-style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door area, actually touching the inside of the fiberglass door. The passenger-side door bars use an X-design. Both doors have rocker bars that are connected to the door bars and are also welded to the rockers with 1/8" tabs. In addition to the straight rear braces, the rear of the cage has X-bars that connect to the rear shock towers. The windshield bar is bent to tuck high up under the windshield, forward and out of the driver's vision. We connected the steering column to the dash bar to add strength in that area, since the factory dash had been removed.

Up front, we removed the factory strut towers and welded aftermarket parts. We then added a tube structure in the front of the car to encapsulate the fuel cell. This structure is attached to the chassis via 1/8" mounting plates. This structure also ties into the front strut towers for additional chassis stiffening.

We started work on this car the same day that Robert had scheduled to drop his car off at Hanksville. This project took only 3 weeks to complete, and allowed Robert to take his 911 to the body shop on schedule to have the car repainted. At Hanksville, a core part of our customer service is to schedule our work realistically, to make good progress on the customer's project, and to keep customers updated on progress. Robert was happy with the results, and we can't wait to see his new, improved car at the track this season. Thanks, Robert!
 




Robert’s Porsche 911 RSR

We had met Robert at the races, where he was driving his nicely-prepared RSR. This car had been raced on the east coast, and had logged miles at Sebring. After the season ended, he called to tell us that he wanted to bring the car in for some cage and sheetmetal work. After discussing his needs at length, we developed a plan of action with Robert.

The cage was an older design, and had issues passing tech: it had areas where the tubes were not fully welded, the main hoop had too many bends, and the rear braces were bent (all of which are not legal for racing in many popular sanctioning bodies and race classes). So, Robert asked us to remove the old cage and fabricate a new Hanksville cage.

Since this had been a race car for many years, prior owners had drilled many holes in the car. Robert asked us to fill these holes to give the car a cleaner look and to make it safer. He also asked us to weld new seat mounts, install an oil cooler and fabricate an air vent/shroud for the cooler, to remove part of the rear sheetmetal and to fabricate an aluminum access panel. We also removed the stock dash and fitted a carbon fiber replacement dash.

This cage features our Extended-style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door area, actually touching the inside of the fiberglass door. The passenger-side door bars use an X-design. Both doors have rocker bars that are connected to the door bars and are also welded to the rockers with 1/8" tabs. In addition to the straight rear braces, the rear of the cage has X-bars that connect to the rear shock towers. The windshield bar is bent to tuck high up under the windshield, forward and out of the driver's vision. We connected the steering column to the dash bar to add strength in that area, since the factory dash had been removed.

Up front, we removed the factory strut towers and welded aftermarket parts. We then added a tube structure in the front of the car to encapsulate the fuel cell. This structure is attached to the chassis via 1/8" mounting plates. This structure also ties into the front strut towers for additional chassis stiffening.

We started work on this car the same day that Robert had scheduled to drop his car off at Hanksville. This project took only 3 weeks to complete, and allowed Robert to take his 911 to the body shop on schedule to have the car repainted. At Hanksville, a core part of our customer service is to schedule our work realistically, to make good progress on the customer's project, and to keep customers updated on progress. Robert was happy with the results, and we can't wait to see his new, improved car at the track this season. Thanks, Robert!
 




Robert’s Porsche 911 RSR

We had met Robert at the races, where he was driving his nicely-prepared RSR. This car had been raced on the east coast, and had logged miles at Sebring. After the season ended, he called to tell us that he wanted to bring the car in for some cage and sheetmetal work. After discussing his needs at length, we developed a plan of action with Robert.

The cage was an older design, and had issues passing tech: it had areas where the tubes were not fully welded, the main hoop had too many bends, and the rear braces were bent (all of which are not legal for racing in many popular sanctioning bodies and race classes). So, Robert asked us to remove the old cage and fabricate a new Hanksville cage.

Since this had been a race car for many years, prior owners had drilled many holes in the car. Robert asked us to fill these holes to give the car a cleaner look and to make it safer. He also asked us to weld new seat mounts, install an oil cooler and fabricate an air vent/shroud for the cooler, to remove part of the rear sheetmetal and to fabricate an aluminum access panel. We also removed the stock dash and fitted a carbon fiber replacement dash.

This cage features our Extended-style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door area, actually touching the inside of the fiberglass door. The passenger-side door bars use an X-design. Both doors have rocker bars that are connected to the door bars and are also welded to the rockers with 1/8" tabs. In addition to the straight rear braces, the rear of the cage has X-bars that connect to the rear shock towers. The windshield bar is bent to tuck high up under the windshield, forward and out of the driver's vision. We connected the steering column to the dash bar to add strength in that area, since the factory dash had been removed.

Up front, we removed the factory strut towers and welded aftermarket parts. We then added a tube structure in the front of the car to encapsulate the fuel cell. This structure is attached to the chassis via 1/8" mounting plates. This structure also ties into the front strut towers for additional chassis stiffening.

We started work on this car the same day that Robert had scheduled to drop his car off at Hanksville. This project took only 3 weeks to complete, and allowed Robert to take his 911 to the body shop on schedule to have the car repainted. At Hanksville, a core part of our customer service is to schedule our work realistically, to make good progress on the customer's project, and to keep customers updated on progress. Robert was happy with the results, and we can't wait to see his new, improved car at the track this season. Thanks, Robert!
 






Robert’s Porsche 911 RSR

We had met Robert at the races, where he was driving his nicely-prepared RSR. This car had been raced on the east coast, and had logged miles at Sebring. After the season ended, he called to tell us that he wanted to bring the car in for some cage and sheetmetal work. After discussing his needs at length, we developed a plan of action with Robert.

The cage was an older design, and had issues passing tech: it had areas where the tubes were not fully welded, the main hoop had too many bends, and the rear braces were bent (all of which are not legal for racing in many popular sanctioning bodies and race classes). So, Robert asked us to remove the old cage and fabricate a new Hanksville cage.

Since this had been a race car for many years, prior owners had drilled many holes in the car. Robert asked us to fill these holes to give the car a cleaner look and to make it safer. He also asked us to weld new seat mounts, install an oil cooler and fabricate an air vent/shroud for the cooler, to remove part of the rear sheetmetal and to fabricate an aluminum access panel. We also removed the stock dash and fitted a carbon fiber replacement dash.

This cage features our Extended-style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door area, actually touching the inside of the fiberglass door. The passenger-side door bars use an X-design. Both doors have rocker bars that are connected to the door bars and are also welded to the rockers with 1/8" tabs. In addition to the straight rear braces, the rear of the cage has X-bars that connect to the rear shock towers. The windshield bar is bent to tuck high up under the windshield, forward and out of the driver's vision. We connected the steering column to the dash bar to add strength in that area, since the factory dash had been removed.

Up front, we removed the factory strut towers and welded aftermarket parts. We then added a tube structure in the front of the car to encapsulate the fuel cell. This structure is attached to the chassis via 1/8" mounting plates. This structure also ties into the front strut towers for additional chassis stiffening.

We started work on this car the same day that Robert had scheduled to drop his car off at Hanksville. This project took only 3 weeks to complete, and allowed Robert to take his 911 to the body shop on schedule to have the car repainted. At Hanksville, a core part of our customer service is to schedule our work realistically, to make good progress on the customer's project, and to keep customers updated on progress. Robert was happy with the results, and we can't wait to see his new, improved car at the track this season. Thanks, Robert!
 




Robert’s Porsche 911 RSR

We had met Robert at the races, where he was driving his nicely-prepared RSR. This car had been raced on the east coast, and had logged miles at Sebring. After the season ended, he called to tell us that he wanted to bring the car in for some cage and sheetmetal work. After discussing his needs at length, we developed a plan of action with Robert.

The cage was an older design, and had issues passing tech: it had areas where the tubes were not fully welded, the main hoop had too many bends, and the rear braces were bent (all of which are not legal for racing in many popular sanctioning bodies and race classes). So, Robert asked us to remove the old cage and fabricate a new Hanksville cage.

Since this had been a race car for many years, prior owners had drilled many holes in the car. Robert asked us to fill these holes to give the car a cleaner look and to make it safer. He also asked us to weld new seat mounts, install an oil cooler and fabricate an air vent/shroud for the cooler, to remove part of the rear sheetmetal and to fabricate an aluminum access panel. We also removed the stock dash and fitted a carbon fiber replacement dash.

This cage features our Extended-style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door area, actually touching the inside of the fiberglass door. The passenger-side door bars use an X-design. Both doors have rocker bars that are connected to the door bars and are also welded to the rockers with 1/8" tabs. In addition to the straight rear braces, the rear of the cage has X-bars that connect to the rear shock towers. The windshield bar is bent to tuck high up under the windshield, forward and out of the driver's vision. We connected the steering column to the dash bar to add strength in that area, since the factory dash had been removed.

Up front, we removed the factory strut towers and welded aftermarket parts. We then added a tube structure in the front of the car to encapsulate the fuel cell. This structure is attached to the chassis via 1/8" mounting plates. This structure also ties into the front strut towers for additional chassis stiffening.

We started work on this car the same day that Robert had scheduled to drop his car off at Hanksville. This project took only 3 weeks to complete, and allowed Robert to take his 911 to the body shop on schedule to have the car repainted. At Hanksville, a core part of our customer service is to schedule our work realistically, to make good progress on the customer's project, and to keep customers updated on progress. Robert was happy with the results, and we can't wait to see his new, improved car at the track this season. Thanks, Robert!
 




Robert’s Porsche 911 RSR

We had met Robert at the races, where he was driving his nicely-prepared RSR. This car had been raced on the east coast, and had logged miles at Sebring. After the season ended, he called to tell us that he wanted to bring the car in for some cage and sheetmetal work. After discussing his needs at length, we developed a plan of action with Robert.

The cage was an older design, and had issues passing tech: it had areas where the tubes were not fully welded, the main hoop had too many bends, and the rear braces were bent (all of which are not legal for racing in many popular sanctioning bodies and race classes). So, Robert asked us to remove the old cage and fabricate a new Hanksville cage.

Since this had been a race car for many years, prior owners had drilled many holes in the car. Robert asked us to fill these holes to give the car a cleaner look and to make it safer. He also asked us to weld new seat mounts, install an oil cooler and fabricate an air vent/shroud for the cooler, to remove part of the rear sheetmetal and to fabricate an aluminum access panel. We also removed the stock dash and fitted a carbon fiber replacement dash.

This cage features our Extended-style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door area, actually touching the inside of the fiberglass door. The passenger-side door bars use an X-design. Both doors have rocker bars that are connected to the door bars and are also welded to the rockers with 1/8" tabs. In addition to the straight rear braces, the rear of the cage has X-bars that connect to the rear shock towers. The windshield bar is bent to tuck high up under the windshield, forward and out of the driver's vision. We connected the steering column to the dash bar to add strength in that area, since the factory dash had been removed.

Up front, we removed the factory strut towers and welded aftermarket parts. We then added a tube structure in the front of the car to encapsulate the fuel cell. This structure is attached to the chassis via 1/8" mounting plates. This structure also ties into the front strut towers for additional chassis stiffening.

We started work on this car the same day that Robert had scheduled to drop his car off at Hanksville. This project took only 3 weeks to complete, and allowed Robert to take his 911 to the body shop on schedule to have the car repainted. At Hanksville, a core part of our customer service is to schedule our work realistically, to make good progress on the customer's project, and to keep customers updated on progress. Robert was happy with the results, and we can't wait to see his new, improved car at the track this season. Thanks, Robert!
 




Robert’s Porsche 911 RSR

We had met Robert at the races, where he was driving his nicely-prepared RSR. This car had been raced on the east coast, and had logged miles at Sebring. After the season ended, he called to tell us that he wanted to bring the car in for some cage and sheetmetal work. After discussing his needs at length, we developed a plan of action with Robert.

The cage was an older design, and had issues passing tech: it had areas where the tubes were not fully welded, the main hoop had too many bends, and the rear braces were bent (all of which are not legal for racing in many popular sanctioning bodies and race classes). So, Robert asked us to remove the old cage and fabricate a new Hanksville cage.

Since this had been a race car for many years, prior owners had drilled many holes in the car. Robert asked us to fill these holes to give the car a cleaner look and to make it safer. He also asked us to weld new seat mounts, install an oil cooler and fabricate an air vent/shroud for the cooler, to remove part of the rear sheetmetal and to fabricate an aluminum access panel. We also removed the stock dash and fitted a carbon fiber replacement dash.

This cage features our Extended-style door bars that extend fully into the driver-side door area, actually touching the inside of the fiberglass door. The passenger-side door bars use an X-design. Both doors have rocker bars that are connected to the door bars and are also welded to the rockers with 1/8" tabs. In addition to the straight rear braces, the rear of the cage has X-bars that connect to the rear shock towers. The windshield bar is bent to tuck high up under the windshield, forward and out of the driver's vision. We connected the steering column to the dash bar to add strength in that area, since the factory dash had been removed.

Up front, we removed the factory strut towers and welded aftermarket parts. We then added a tube structure in the front of the car to encapsulate the fuel cell. This structure is attached to the chassis via 1/8" mounting plates. This structure also ties into the front strut towers for additional chassis stiffening.

We started work on this car the same day that Robert had scheduled to drop his car off at Hanksville. This project took only 3 weeks to complete, and allowed Robert to take his 911 to the body shop on schedule to have the car repainted. At Hanksville, a core part of our customer service is to schedule our work realistically, to make good progress on the customer's project, and to keep customers updated on progress. Robert was happy with the results, and we can't wait to see his new, improved car at the track this season. Thanks, Robert!
 




Tad's 930 Turbo

Tad was referred to us by Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who was making extensive suspension modifications to this car. Once the car was ready for a cage, Tad brought it to us. This was the third full cage that we built for a 911-bodied car during the '08-'09 off-season.

After discussing various design features that we used on Robert's RSR and Nick's 911 (see below), Tad chose to have us build a 6-point cage with straight door bars and additional bracing in the areas of the front and rear strut/shock towers.  As usual, we CAD programmed our bender and designed and fabricated the cage to maximize driver space.

After forming the mounting plates, we bent the main hoop and forward hoops, then fitted the rear braces. The windshield bar is bent to allow as much forward visibility as possible, and the dash bar fits closely beneath the dash. We added mounting plates on the insides of the front shock towers, then extended connectors from the dash bar forward to the strut tower crossbar to add strength to the front suspension. Rather than adding X-bars in the rear area, Tad asked us to add mounting plates to the rear shock towers, thenadded a crossbar between the towers and connected this to the rear braces.

After the cage was completed, we filled various holes in the sheetmetal and added tubular seat mounts. To complete the project, we enclosed the rear area by fabricating an aluminum access panel.

Like the cages that we built for Robert and Nick, this was an exciting project that has really helped to expand our name recognition and reputation for great-fitting, quality cages at a reasonable price for PCA racers. Thanks, Tad!
 

Tad's 930 Turbo

Tad was referred to us by Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who was making extensive suspension modifications to this car. Once the car was ready for a cage, Tad brought it to us. This was the third full cage that we built for a 911-bodied car during the '08-'09 off-season.

After discussing various design features that we used on Robert's RSR and Nick's 911 (see below), Tad chose to have us build a 6-point cage with straight door bars and additional bracing in the areas of the front and rear strut/shock towers.  As usual, we CAD programmed our bender and designed and fabricated the cage to maximize driver space.

After forming the mounting plates, we bent the main hoop and forward hoops, then fitted the rear braces. The windshield bar is bent to allow as much forward visibility as possible, and the dash bar fits closely beneath the dash. We added mounting plates on the insides of the front shock towers, then extended connectors from the dash bar forward to the strut tower crossbar to add strength to the front suspension. Rather than adding X-bars in the rear area, Tad asked us to add mounting plates to the rear shock towers, thenadded a crossbar between the towers and connected this to the rear braces.

After the cage was completed, we filled various holes in the sheetmetal and added tubular seat mounts. To complete the project, we enclosed the rear area by fabricating an aluminum access panel.

Like the cages that we built for Robert and Nick, this was an exciting project that has really helped to expand our name recognition and reputation for great-fitting, quality cages at a reasonable price for PCA racers. Thanks, Tad!
 


Tad's 930 Turbo

Tad was referred to us by Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who was making extensive suspension modifications to this car. Once the car was ready for a cage, Tad brought it to us. This was the third full cage that we built for a 911-bodied car during the '08-'09 off-season.

After discussing various design features that we used on Robert's RSR and Nick's 911 (see below), Tad chose to have us build a 6-point cage with straight door bars and additional bracing in the areas of the front and rear strut/shock towers.  As usual, we CAD programmed our bender and designed and fabricated the cage to maximize driver space.

After forming the mounting plates, we bent the main hoop and forward hoops, then fitted the rear braces. The windshield bar is bent to allow as much forward visibility as possible, and the dash bar fits closely beneath the dash. We added mounting plates on the insides of the front shock towers, then extended connectors from the dash bar forward to the strut tower crossbar to add strength to the front suspension. Rather than adding X-bars in the rear area, Tad asked us to add mounting plates to the rear shock towers, thenadded a crossbar between the towers and connected this to the rear braces.

After the cage was completed, we filled various holes in the sheetmetal and added tubular seat mounts. To complete the project, we enclosed the rear area by fabricating an aluminum access panel.

Like the cages that we built for Robert and Nick, this was an exciting project that has really helped to expand our name recognition and reputation for great-fitting, quality cages at a reasonable price for PCA racers. Thanks, Tad!
 


Tad's 930 Turbo

Tad was referred to us by Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who was making extensive suspension modifications to this car. Once the car was ready for a cage, Tad brought it to us. This was the third full cage that we built for a 911-bodied car during the '08-'09 off-season.

After discussing various design features that we used on Robert's RSR and Nick's 911 (see below), Tad chose to have us build a 6-point cage with straight door bars and additional bracing in the areas of the front and rear strut/shock towers.  As usual, we CAD programmed our bender and designed and fabricated the cage to maximize driver space.

After forming the mounting plates, we bent the main hoop and forward hoops, then fitted the rear braces. The windshield bar is bent to allow as much forward visibility as possible, and the dash bar fits closely beneath the dash. We added mounting plates on the insides of the front shock towers, then extended connectors from the dash bar forward to the strut tower crossbar to add strength to the front suspension. Rather than adding X-bars in the rear area, Tad asked us to add mounting plates to the rear shock towers, thenadded a crossbar between the towers and connected this to the rear braces.

After the cage was completed, we filled various holes in the sheetmetal and added tubular seat mounts. To complete the project, we enclosed the rear area by fabricating an aluminum access panel.

Like the cages that we built for Robert and Nick, this was an exciting project that has really helped to expand our name recognition and reputation for great-fitting, quality cages at a reasonable price for PCA racers. Thanks, Tad!
 


Tad's 930 Turbo

Tad was referred to us by Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who was making extensive suspension modifications to this car. Once the car was ready for a cage, Tad brought it to us. This was the third full cage that we built for a 911-bodied car during the '08-'09 off-season.

After discussing various design features that we used on Robert's RSR and Nick's 911 (see below), Tad chose to have us build a 6-point cage with straight door bars and additional bracing in the areas of the front and rear strut/shock towers.  As usual, we CAD programmed our bender and designed and fabricated the cage to maximize driver space.

After forming the mounting plates, we bent the main hoop and forward hoops, then fitted the rear braces. The windshield bar is bent to allow as much forward visibility as possible, and the dash bar fits closely beneath the dash. We added mounting plates on the insides of the front shock towers, then extended connectors from the dash bar forward to the strut tower crossbar to add strength to the front suspension. Rather than adding X-bars in the rear area, Tad asked us to add mounting plates to the rear shock towers, thenadded a crossbar between the towers and connected this to the rear braces.

After the cage was completed, we filled various holes in the sheetmetal and added tubular seat mounts. To complete the project, we enclosed the rear area by fabricating an aluminum access panel.

Like the cages that we built for Robert and Nick, this was an exciting project that has really helped to expand our name recognition and reputation for great-fitting, quality cages at a reasonable price for PCA racers. Thanks, Tad!
 


Tad's 930 Turbo

Tad was referred to us by Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who was making extensive suspension modifications to this car. Once the car was ready for a cage, Tad brought it to us. This was the third full cage that we built for a 911-bodied car during the '08-'09 off-season.

After discussing various design features that we used on Robert's RSR and Nick's 911 (see below), Tad chose to have us build a 6-point cage with straight door bars and additional bracing in the areas of the front and rear strut/shock towers.  As usual, we CAD programmed our bender and designed and fabricated the cage to maximize driver space.

After forming the mounting plates, we bent the main hoop and forward hoops, then fitted the rear braces. The windshield bar is bent to allow as much forward visibility as possible, and the dash bar fits closely beneath the dash. We added mounting plates on the insides of the front shock towers, then extended connectors from the dash bar forward to the strut tower crossbar to add strength to the front suspension. Rather than adding X-bars in the rear area, Tad asked us to add mounting plates to the rear shock towers, thenadded a crossbar between the towers and connected this to the rear braces.

After the cage was completed, we filled various holes in the sheetmetal and added tubular seat mounts. To complete the project, we enclosed the rear area by fabricating an aluminum access panel.

Like the cages that we built for Robert and Nick, this was an exciting project that has really helped to expand our name recognition and reputation for great-fitting, quality cages at a reasonable price for PCA racers. Thanks, Tad!
 


Tad's 930 Turbo

Tad was referred to us by Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who was making extensive suspension modifications to this car. Once the car was ready for a cage, Tad brought it to us. This was the third full cage that we built for a 911-bodied car during the '08-'09 off-season.

After discussing various design features that we used on Robert's RSR and Nick's 911 (see below), Tad chose to have us build a 6-point cage with straight door bars and additional bracing in the areas of the front and rear strut/shock towers.  As usual, we CAD programmed our bender and designed and fabricated the cage to maximize driver space.

After forming the mounting plates, we bent the main hoop and forward hoops, then fitted the rear braces. The windshield bar is bent to allow as much forward visibility as possible, and the dash bar fits closely beneath the dash. We added mounting plates on the insides of the front shock towers, then extended connectors from the dash bar forward to the strut tower crossbar to add strength to the front suspension. Rather than adding X-bars in the rear area, Tad asked us to add mounting plates to the rear shock towers, thenadded a crossbar between the towers and connected this to the rear braces.

After the cage was completed, we filled various holes in the sheetmetal and added tubular seat mounts. To complete the project, we enclosed the rear area by fabricating an aluminum access panel.

Like the cages that we built for Robert and Nick, this was an exciting project that has really helped to expand our name recognition and reputation for great-fitting, quality cages at a reasonable price for PCA racers. Thanks, Tad!
 


Tad's 930 Turbo

Tad was referred to us by Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who was making extensive suspension modifications to this car. Once the car was ready for a cage, Tad brought it to us. This was the third full cage that we built for a 911-bodied car during the '08-'09 off-season.

After discussing various design features that we used on Robert's RSR and Nick's 911 (see below), Tad chose to have us build a 6-point cage with straight door bars and additional bracing in the areas of the front and rear strut/shock towers.  As usual, we CAD programmed our bender and designed and fabricated the cage to maximize driver space.

After forming the mounting plates, we bent the main hoop and forward hoops, then fitted the rear braces. The windshield bar is bent to allow as much forward visibility as possible, and the dash bar fits closely beneath the dash. We added mounting plates on the insides of the front shock towers, then extended connectors from the dash bar forward to the strut tower crossbar to add strength to the front suspension. Rather than adding X-bars in the rear area, Tad asked us to add mounting plates to the rear shock towers, thenadded a crossbar between the towers and connected this to the rear braces.

After the cage was completed, we filled various holes in the sheetmetal and added tubular seat mounts. To complete the project, we enclosed the rear area by fabricating an aluminum access panel.

Like the cages that we built for Robert and Nick, this was an exciting project that has really helped to expand our name recognition and reputation for great-fitting, quality cages at a reasonable price for PCA racers. Thanks, Tad!
 


Tad's 930 Turbo

Tad was referred to us by Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who was making extensive suspension modifications to this car. Once the car was ready for a cage, Tad brought it to us. This was the third full cage that we built for a 911-bodied car during the '08-'09 off-season.

After discussing various design features that we used on Robert's RSR and Nick's 911 (see below), Tad chose to have us build a 6-point cage with straight door bars and additional bracing in the areas of the front and rear strut/shock towers.  As usual, we CAD programmed our bender and designed and fabricated the cage to maximize driver space.

After forming the mounting plates, we bent the main hoop and forward hoops, then fitted the rear braces. The windshield bar is bent to allow as much forward visibility as possible, and the dash bar fits closely beneath the dash. We added mounting plates on the insides of the front shock towers, then extended connectors from the dash bar forward to the strut tower crossbar to add strength to the front suspension. Rather than adding X-bars in the rear area, Tad asked us to add mounting plates to the rear shock towers, thenadded a crossbar between the towers and connected this to the rear braces.

After the cage was completed, we filled various holes in the sheetmetal and added tubular seat mounts. To complete the project, we enclosed the rear area by fabricating an aluminum access panel.

Like the cages that we built for Robert and Nick, this was an exciting project that has really helped to expand our name recognition and reputation for great-fitting, quality cages at a reasonable price for PCA racers. Thanks, Tad!
 


Tad's 930 Turbo

Tad was referred to us by Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who was making extensive suspension modifications to this car. Once the car was ready for a cage, Tad brought it to us. This was the third full cage that we built for a 911-bodied car during the '08-'09 off-season.

After discussing various design features that we used on Robert's RSR and Nick's 911 (see below), Tad chose to have us build a 6-point cage with straight door bars and additional bracing in the areas of the front and rear strut/shock towers.  As usual, we CAD programmed our bender and designed and fabricated the cage to maximize driver space.

After forming the mounting plates, we bent the main hoop and forward hoops, then fitted the rear braces. The windshield bar is bent to allow as much forward visibility as possible, and the dash bar fits closely beneath the dash. We added mounting plates on the insides of the front shock towers, then extended connectors from the dash bar forward to the strut tower crossbar to add strength to the front suspension. Rather than adding X-bars in the rear area, Tad asked us to add mounting plates to the rear shock towers, thenadded a crossbar between the towers and connected this to the rear braces.

After the cage was completed, we filled various holes in the sheetmetal and added tubular seat mounts. To complete the project, we enclosed the rear area by fabricating an aluminum access panel.

Like the cages that we built for Robert and Nick, this was an exciting project that has really helped to expand our name recognition and reputation for great-fitting, quality cages at a reasonable price for PCA racers. Thanks, Tad!
 

Tad's 930 Turbo

Tad was referred to us by Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who was making extensive suspension modifications to this car. Once the car was ready for a cage, Tad brought it to us. This was the third full cage that we built for a 911-bodied car during the '08-'09 off-season.

After discussing various design features that we used on Robert's RSR and Nick's 911 (see below), Tad chose to have us build a 6-point cage with straight door bars and additional bracing in the areas of the front and rear strut/shock towers.  As usual, we CAD programmed our bender and designed and fabricated the cage to maximize driver space.

After forming the mounting plates, we bent the main hoop and forward hoops, then fitted the rear braces. The windshield bar is bent to allow as much forward visibility as possible, and the dash bar fits closely beneath the dash. We added mounting plates on the insides of the front shock towers, then extended connectors from the dash bar forward to the strut tower crossbar to add strength to the front suspension. Rather than adding X-bars in the rear area, Tad asked us to add mounting plates to the rear shock towers, thenadded a crossbar between the towers and connected this to the rear braces.

After the cage was completed, we filled various holes in the sheetmetal and added tubular seat mounts. To complete the project, we enclosed the rear area by fabricating an aluminum access panel.

Like the cages that we built for Robert and Nick, this was an exciting project that has really helped to expand our name recognition and reputation for great-fitting, quality cages at a reasonable price for PCA racers. Thanks, Tad!
 


Tad's 930 Turbo

Tad was referred to us by Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who was making extensive suspension modifications to this car. Once the car was ready for a cage, Tad brought it to us. This was the third full cage that we built for a 911-bodied car during the '08-'09 off-season.

After discussing various design features that we used on Robert's RSR and Nick's 911 (see below), Tad chose to have us build a 6-point cage with straight door bars and additional bracing in the areas of the front and rear strut/shock towers.  As usual, we CAD programmed our bender and designed and fabricated the cage to maximize driver space.

After forming the mounting plates, we bent the main hoop and forward hoops, then fitted the rear braces. The windshield bar is bent to allow as much forward visibility as possible, and the dash bar fits closely beneath the dash. We added mounting plates on the insides of the front shock towers, then extended connectors from the dash bar forward to the strut tower crossbar to add strength to the front suspension. Rather than adding X-bars in the rear area, Tad asked us to add mounting plates to the rear shock towers, thenadded a crossbar between the towers and connected this to the rear braces.

After the cage was completed, we filled various holes in the sheetmetal and added tubular seat mounts. To complete the project, we enclosed the rear area by fabricating an aluminum access panel.

Like the cages that we built for Robert and Nick, this was an exciting project that has really helped to expand our name recognition and reputation for great-fitting, quality cages at a reasonable price for PCA racers. Thanks, Tad!
 

Tad's 930 Turbo

Tad was referred to us by Orrin at Eurosport Ltd., who was making extensive suspension modifications to this car. Once the car was ready for a cage, Tad brought it to us. This was the third full cage that we built for a 911-bodied car during the '08-'09 off-season.

After discussing various design features that we used on Robert's RSR and Nick's 911 (see below), Tad chose to have us build a 6-point cage with straight door bars and additional bracing in the areas of the front and rear strut/shock towers.  As usual, we CAD programmed our bender and designed and fabricated the cage to maximize driver space.

After forming the mounting plates, we bent the main hoop and forward hoops, then fitted the rear braces. The windshield bar is bent to allow as much forward visibility as possible, and the dash bar fits closely beneath the dash. We added mounting plates on the insides of the front shock towers, then extended connectors from the dash bar forward to the strut tower crossbar to add strength to the front suspension. Rather than adding X-bars in the rear area, Tad asked us to add mounting plates to the rear shock towers, thenadded a crossbar between the towers and connected this to the rear braces.

After the cage was completed, we filled various holes in the sheetmetal and added tubular seat mounts. To complete the project, we enclosed the rear area by fabricating an aluminum access panel.

Like the cages that we built for Robert and Nick, this was an exciting project that has really helped to expand our name recognition and reputation for great-fitting, quality cages at a reasonable price for PCA racers. Thanks, Tad!
 

Nick’s Porsche 911

Nick's 911 already had a cage, and he brought his car to us on the way to the body shop where it was scheduled to be repainted. He asked us about fitting new door bars to the existing cage, then explained how he did not like the welds on the existing cage. After discussing the quality of his existing cage, he decided to have Hanksville remove the old cage and fabricate a new, better-fitting, better-welded cage.

After removing the old cage, we measured the car's interior and designed the new cage tubes for the car. Fortunately, Nick's friend Robert had brought his 911 RSR to us for a new cage the week before, so we were able to review the CAD designs for Robert's cage and adapt them to Nick's car. This allowed us to save time and finish Nick's cage in an accelerated timeframe, which fit his and his painter's schedules.

Although most of our cages use a dash bar that fits near the firewall below the windshield (providing more room for the driver's knees), Nick asked us to duplicate his existing cage's dash bar design, which is commonly called a "knee bar" for obvious reasons. We don't recommend this design, but since Nick specifically requested this design, we followed his instructions.

We used our Extended-Style door bars which extend fully into the driver-side door, with the door bars actually touching the inner door skin to provide Nick with the maximum space possible. We added slight bends in the passenger-side door bars, to give the passenger a little extra elbow room as well.

Nick has had issues in the past with cracks in his torsion tube. We welded these cracks, and then added diagonal bars that connect the cage's main hoop to the torsion tube to strengthen this area.

In addition to the cage fabrication, Nick asked us to remove many wiring tabs and hangers, fill many holes in the car, and fill the fuel filler door.

Thanks to our CAD programmng, CNC benders and experienced fabricators, this project (including the cage fabrication and welding, as well as the sheetmetal work) was completed in only 2 weeks and the car went to the body shop immediately after leaving Hanksville.

 




Nick’s Porsche 911

Nick's 911 already had a cage, and he brought his car to us on the way to the body shop where it was scheduled to be repainted. He asked us about fitting new door bars to the existing cage, then explained how he did not like the welds on the existing cage. After discussing the quality of his existing cage, he decided to have Hanksville remove the old cage and fabricate a new, better-fitting, better-welded cage.

After removing the old cage, we measured the car's interior and designed the new cage tubes for the car. Fortunately, Nick's friend Robert had brought his 911 RSR to us for a new cage the week before, so we were able to review the CAD designs for Robert's cage and adapt them to Nick's car. This allowed us to save time and finish Nick's cage in an accelerated timeframe, which fit his and his painter's schedules.

Although most of our cages use a dash bar that fits near the firewall below the windshield (providing more room for the driver's knees), Nick asked us to duplicate his existing cage's dash bar design, which is commonly called a "knee bar" for obvious reasons. We don't recommend this design, but since Nick specifically requested this design, we followed his instructions.

We used our Extended-Style door bars which extend fully into the driver-side door, with the door bars actually touching the inner door skin to provide Nick with the maximum space possible. We added slight bends in the passenger-side door bars, to give the passenger a little extra elbow room as well.

Nick has had issues in the past with cracks in his torsion tube. We welded these cracks, and then added diagonal bars that connect the cage's main hoop to the torsion tube to strengthen this area.

In addition to the cage fabrication, Nick asked us to remove many wiring tabs and hangers, fill many holes in the car, and fill the fuel filler door.

Thanks to our CAD programmng, CNC benders and experienced fabricators, this project (including the cage fabrication and welding, as well as the sheetmetal work) was completed in only 2 weeks and the car went to the body shop immediately after leaving Hanksville.

 




Nick’s Porsche 911

Nick's 911 already had a cage, and he brought his car to us on the way to the body shop where it was scheduled to be repainted. He asked us about fitting new door bars to the existing cage, then explained how he did not like the welds on the existing cage. After discussing the quality of his existing cage, he decided to have Hanksville remove the old cage and fabricate a new, better-fitting, better-welded cage.

After removing the old cage, we measured the car's interior and designed the new cage tubes for the car. Fortunately, Nick's friend Robert had brought his 911 RSR to us for a new cage the week before, so we were able to review the CAD designs for Robert's cage and adapt them to Nick's car. This allowed us to save time and finish Nick's cage in an accelerated timeframe, which fit his and his painter's schedules.

Although most of our cages use a dash bar that fits near the firewall below the windshield (providing more room for the driver's knees), Nick asked us to duplicate his existing cage's dash bar design, which is commonly called a "knee bar" for obvious reasons. We don't recommend this design, but since Nick specifically requested this design, we followed his instructions.

We used our Extended-Style door bars which extend fully into the driver-side door, with the door bars actually touching the inner door skin to provide Nick with the maximum space possible. We added slight bends in the passenger-side door bars, to give the passenger a little extra elbow room as well.

Nick has had issues in the past with cracks in his torsion tube. We welded these cracks, and then added diagonal bars that connect the cage's main hoop to the torsion tube to strengthen this area.

In addition to the cage fabrication, Nick asked us to remove many wiring tabs and hangers, fill many holes in the car, and fill the fuel filler door.

Thanks to our CAD programmng, CNC benders and experienced fabricators, this project (including the cage fabrication and welding, as well as the sheetmetal work) was completed in only 2 weeks and the car went to the body shop immediately after leaving Hanksville.

 




Nick’s Porsche 911

Nick's 911 already had a cage, and he brought his car to us on the way to the body shop where it was scheduled to be repainted. He asked us about fitting new door bars to the existing cage, then explained how he did not like the welds on the existing cage. After discussing the quality of his existing cage, he decided to have Hanksville remove the old cage and fabricate a new, better-fitting, better-welded cage.

After removing the old cage, we measured the car's interior and designed the new cage tubes for the car. Fortunately, Nick's friend Robert had brought his 911 RSR to us for a new cage the week before, so we were able to review the CAD designs for Robert's cage and adapt them to Nick's car. This allowed us to save time and finish Nick's cage in an accelerated timeframe, which fit his and his painter's schedules.

Although most of our cages use a dash bar that fits near the firewall below the windshield (providing more room for the driver's knees), Nick asked us to duplicate his existing cage's dash bar design, which is commonly called a "knee bar" for obvious reasons. We don't recommend this design, but since Nick specifically requested this design, we followed his instructions.

We used our Extended-Style door bars which extend fully into the driver-side door, with the door bars actually touching the inner door skin to provide Nick with the maximum space possible. We added slight bends in the passenger-side door bars, to give the passenger a little extra elbow room as well.

Nick has had issues in the past with cracks in his torsion tube. We welded these cracks, and then added diagonal bars that connect the cage's main hoop to the torsion tube to strengthen this area.

In addition to the cage fabrication, Nick asked us to remove many wiring tabs and hangers, fill many holes in the car, and fill the fuel filler door.

Thanks to our CAD programmng, CNC benders and experienced fabricators, this project (including the cage fabrication and welding, as well as the sheetmetal work) was completed in only 2 weeks and the car went to the body shop immediately after leaving Hanksville.

 


Nick’s Porsche 911

Nick's 911 already had a cage, and he brought his car to us on the way to the body shop where it was scheduled to be repainted. He asked us about fitting new door bars to the existing cage, then explained how he did not like the welds on the existing cage. After discussing the quality of his existing cage, he decided to have Hanksville remove the old cage and fabricate a new, better-fitting, better-welded cage.

After removing the old cage, we measured the car's interior and designed the new cage tubes for the car. Fortunately, Nick's friend Robert had brought his 911 RSR to us for a new cage the week before, so we were able to review the CAD designs for Robert's cage and adapt them to Nick's car. This allowed us to save time and finish Nick's cage in an accelerated timeframe, which fit his and his painter's schedules.

Although most of our cages use a dash bar that fits near the firewall below the windshield (providing more room for the driver's knees), Nick asked us to duplicate his existing cage's dash bar design, which is commonly called a "knee bar" for obvious reasons. We don't recommend this design, but since Nick specifically requested this design, we followed his instructions.

We used our Extended-Style door bars which extend fully into the driver-side door, with the door bars actually touching the inner door skin to provide Nick with the maximum space possible. We added slight bends in the passenger-side door bars, to give the passenger a little extra elbow room as well.

Nick has had issues in the past with cracks in his torsion tube. We welded these cracks, and then added diagonal bars that connect the cage's main hoop to the torsion tube to strengthen this area.

In addition to the cage fabrication, Nick asked us to remove many wiring tabs and hangers, fill many holes in the car, and fill the fuel filler door.

Thanks to our CAD programmng, CNC benders and experienced fabricators, this project (including the cage fabrication and welding, as well as the sheetmetal work) was completed in only 2 weeks and the car went to the body shop immediately after leaving Hanksville.

 




Nick’s Porsche 911

Nick's 911 already had a cage, and he brought his car to us on the way to the body shop where it was scheduled to be repainted. He asked us about fitting new door bars to the existing cage, then explained how he did not like the welds on the existing cage. After discussing the quality of his existing cage, he decided to have Hanksville remove the old cage and fabricate a new, better-fitting, better-welded cage.

After removing the old cage, we measured the car's interior and designed the new cage tubes for the car. Fortunately, Nick's friend Robert had brought his 911 RSR to us for a new cage the week before, so we were able to review the CAD designs for Robert's cage and adapt them to Nick's car. This allowed us to save time and finish Nick's cage in an accelerated timeframe, which fit his and his painter's schedules.

Although most of our cages use a dash bar that fits near the firewall below the windshield (providing more room for the driver's knees), Nick asked us to duplicate his existing cage's dash bar design, which is commonly called a "knee bar" for obvious reasons. We don't recommend this design, but since Nick specifically requested this design, we followed his instructions.

We used our Extended-Style door bars which extend fully into the driver-side door, with the door bars actually touching the inner door skin to provide Nick with the maximum space possible. We added slight bends in the passenger-side door bars, to give the passenger a little extra elbow room as well.

Nick has had issues in the past with cracks in his torsion tube. We welded these cracks, and then added diagonal bars that connect the cage's main hoop to the torsion tube to strengthen this area.

In addition to the cage fabrication, Nick asked us to remove many wiring tabs and hangers, fill many holes in the car, and fill the fuel filler door.

Thanks to our CAD programmng, CNC benders and experienced fabricators, this project (including the cage fabrication and welding, as well as the sheetmetal work) was completed in only 2 weeks and the car went to the body shop immediately after leaving Hanksville.

 




Nick’s Porsche 911

Nick's 911 already had a cage, and he brought his car to us on the way to the body shop where it was scheduled to be repainted. He asked us about fitting new door bars to the existing cage, then explained how he did not like the welds on the existing cage. After discussing the quality of his existing cage, he decided to have Hanksville remove the old cage and fabricate a new, better-fitting, better-welded cage.

After removing the old cage, we measured the car's interior and designed the new cage tubes for the car. Fortunately, Nick's friend Robert had brought his 911 RSR to us for a new cage the week before, so we were able to review the CAD designs for Robert's cage and adapt them to Nick's car. This allowed us to save time and finish Nick's cage in an accelerated timeframe, which fit his and his painter's schedules.

Although most of our cages use a dash bar that fits near the firewall below the windshield (providing more room for the driver's knees), Nick asked us to duplicate his existing cage's dash bar design, which is commonly called a "knee bar" for obvious reasons. We don't recommend this design, but since Nick specifically requested this design, we followed his instructions.

We used our Extended-Style door bars which extend fully into the driver-side door, with the door bars actually touching the inner door skin to provide Nick with the maximum space possible. We added slight bends in the passenger-side door bars, to give the passenger a little extra elbow room as well.

Nick has had issues in the past with cracks in his torsion tube. We welded these cracks, and then added diagonal bars that connect the cage's main hoop to the torsion tube to strengthen this area.

In addition to the cage fabrication, Nick asked us to remove many wiring tabs and hangers, fill many holes in the car, and fill the fuel filler door.

Thanks to our CAD programmng, CNC benders and experienced fabricators, this project (including the cage fabrication and welding, as well as the sheetmetal work) was completed in only 2 weeks and the car went to the body shop immediately after leaving Hanksville.

 




Nick’s Porsche 911

Nick's 911 already had a cage, and he brought his car to us on the way to the body shop where it was scheduled to be repainted. He asked us about fitting new door bars to the existing cage, then explained how he did not like the welds on the existing cage. After discussing the quality of his existing cage, he decided to have Hanksville remove the old cage and fabricate a new, better-fitting, better-welded cage.

After removing the old cage, we measured the car's interior and designed the new cage tubes for the car. Fortunately, Nick's friend Robert had brought his 911 RSR to us for a new cage the week before, so we were able to review the CAD designs for Robert's cage and adapt them to Nick's car. This allowed us to save time and finish Nick's cage in an accelerated timeframe, which fit his and his painter's schedules.

Although most of our cages use a dash bar that fits near the firewall below the windshield (providing more room for the driver's knees), Nick asked us to duplicate his existing cage's dash bar design, which is commonly called a "knee bar" for obvious reasons. We don't recommend this design, but since Nick specifically requested this design, we followed his instructions.

We used our Extended-Style door bars which extend fully into the driver-side door, with the door bars actually touching the inner door skin to provide Nick with the maximum space possible. We added slight bends in the passenger-side door bars, to give the passenger a little extra elbow room as well.

Nick has had issues in the past with cracks in his torsion tube. We welded these cracks, and then added diagonal bars that connect the cage's main hoop to the torsion tube to strengthen this area.

In addition to the cage fabrication, Nick asked us to remove many wiring tabs and hangers, fill many holes in the car, and fill the fuel filler door.

Thanks to our CAD programmng, CNC benders and experienced fabricators, this project (including the cage fabrication and welding, as well as the sheetmetal work) was completed in only 2 weeks and the car went to the body shop immediately after leaving Hanksville.

 


Tim's 911 SC

Wanting to begin Porsche Club racing, Tim removed the interior from his nice SC and brought it to Hanksville for a new cage.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" DOM, and we used 1.0" x .095" DOM for the tube gussets at the upper corners. Wanting to keep the existing door panels and windows, and also wanting to make it easy for entry and exit, Tim asked us to fit the lower door bar low, and to wrap the upper door bar under the armrest/door handle. This creates a unique appearance that still provides good side-impact protection.
Tim's 911 SC

Wanting to begin Porsche Club racing, Tim removed the interior from his nice SC and brought it to Hanksville for a new cage.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" DOM, and we used 1.0" x .095" DOM for the tube gussets at the upper corners. Wanting to keep the existing door panels and windows, and also wanting to make it easy for entry and exit, Tim asked us to fit the lower door bar low, and to wrap the upper door bar under the armrest/door handle. This creates a unique appearance that still provides good side-impact protection.
Tim's 911 SC

Wanting to begin Porsche Club racing, Tim removed the interior from his nice SC and brought it to Hanksville for a new cage.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" DOM, and we used 1.0" x .095" DOM for the tube gussets at the upper corners. Wanting to keep the existing door panels and windows, and also wanting to make it easy for entry and exit, Tim asked us to fit the lower door bar low, and to wrap the upper door bar under the armrest/door handle. This creates a unique appearance that still provides good side-impact protection.
Tim's 911 SC

Wanting to begin Porsche Club racing, Tim removed the interior from his nice SC and brought it to Hanksville for a new cage.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" DOM, and we used 1.0" x .095" DOM for the tube gussets at the upper corners. Wanting to keep the existing door panels and windows, and also wanting to make it easy for entry and exit, Tim asked us to fit the lower door bar low, and to wrap the upper door bar under the armrest/door handle. This creates a unique appearance that still provides good side-impact protection.
Tim's 911 SC

Wanting to begin Porsche Club racing, Tim removed the interior from his nice SC and brought it to Hanksville for a new cage.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" DOM, and we used 1.0" x .095" DOM for the tube gussets at the upper corners. Wanting to keep the existing door panels and windows, and also wanting to make it easy for entry and exit, Tim asked us to fit the lower door bar low, and to wrap the upper door bar under the armrest/door handle. This creates a unique appearance that still provides good side-impact protection.
Tim's 911 SC

Wanting to begin Porsche Club racing, Tim removed the interior from his nice SC and brought it to Hanksville for a new cage.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" DOM, and we used 1.0" x .095" DOM for the tube gussets at the upper corners. Wanting to keep the existing door panels and windows, and also wanting to make it easy for entry and exit, Tim asked us to fit the lower door bar low, and to wrap the upper door bar under the armrest/door handle. This creates a unique appearance that still provides good side-impact protection.
Tim's 911 SC

Wanting to begin Porsche Club racing, Tim removed the interior from his nice SC and brought it to Hanksville for a new cage.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" DOM, and we used 1.0" x .095" DOM for the tube gussets at the upper corners. Wanting to keep the existing door panels and windows, and also wanting to make it easy for entry and exit, Tim asked us to fit the lower door bar low, and to wrap the upper door bar under the armrest/door handle. This creates a unique appearance that still provides good side-impact protection.
Tim's 911 SC

Wanting to begin Porsche Club racing, Tim removed the interior from his nice SC and brought it to Hanksville for a new cage.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" DOM, and we used 1.0" x .095" DOM for the tube gussets at the upper corners. Wanting to keep the existing door panels and windows, and also wanting to make it easy for entry and exit, Tim asked us to fit the lower door bar low, and to wrap the upper door bar under the armrest/door handle. This creates a unique appearance that still provides good side-impact protection.
Tim's 911 SC

Wanting to begin Porsche Club racing, Tim removed the interior from his nice SC and brought it to Hanksville for a new cage.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" DOM, and we used 1.0" x .095" DOM for the tube gussets at the upper corners. Wanting to keep the existing door panels and windows, and also wanting to make it easy for entry and exit, Tim asked us to fit the lower door bar low, and to wrap the upper door bar under the armrest/door handle. This creates a unique appearance that still provides good side-impact protection.
Tim's 911 SC

Wanting to begin Porsche Club racing, Tim removed the interior from his nice SC and brought it to Hanksville for a new cage.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" DOM, and we used 1.0" x .095" DOM for the tube gussets at the upper corners. Wanting to keep the existing door panels and windows, and also wanting to make it easy for entry and exit, Tim asked us to fit the lower door bar low, and to wrap the upper door bar under the armrest/door handle. This creates a unique appearance that still provides good side-impact protection.
Tim's 911 SC

Wanting to begin Porsche Club racing, Tim removed the interior from his nice SC and brought it to Hanksville for a new cage.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" DOM, and we used 1.0" x .095" DOM for the tube gussets at the upper corners. Wanting to keep the existing door panels and windows, and also wanting to make it easy for entry and exit, Tim asked us to fit the lower door bar low, and to wrap the upper door bar under the armrest/door handle. This creates a unique appearance that still provides good side-impact protection.
Tim's 911 SC

Wanting to begin Porsche Club racing, Tim removed the interior from his nice SC and brought it to Hanksville for a new cage.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" DOM, and we used 1.0" x .095" DOM for the tube gussets at the upper corners. Wanting to keep the existing door panels and windows, and also wanting to make it easy for entry and exit, Tim asked us to fit the lower door bar low, and to wrap the upper door bar under the armrest/door handle. This creates a unique appearance that still provides good side-impact protection.
Tim's 911 SC

Wanting to begin Porsche Club racing, Tim removed the interior from his nice SC and brought it to Hanksville for a new cage.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" DOM, and we used 1.0" x .095" DOM for the tube gussets at the upper corners. Wanting to keep the existing door panels and windows, and also wanting to make it easy for entry and exit, Tim asked us to fit the lower door bar low, and to wrap the upper door bar under the armrest/door handle. This creates a unique appearance that still provides good side-impact protection.
Tim's 911 SC

Wanting to begin Porsche Club racing, Tim removed the interior from his nice SC and brought it to Hanksville for a new cage.

The main tubes in this cage are TIG-welded 1.5" x .120" DOM, and we used 1.0" x .095" DOM for the tube gussets at the upper corners. Wanting to keep the existing door panels and windows, and also wanting to make it easy for entry and exit, Tim asked us to fit the lower door bar low, and to wrap the upper door bar under the armrest/door handle. This creates a unique appearance that still provides good side-impact protection.
Frenetic Racing 911 RSRs

John and Alexandra brought their beautiful 911 RSRs to Hanksville for cage upgrades. The existing cages had been built by an out-of-state shop, but there were some issues with the cages that John and Alexandra wanted to have addressed. After carefully inspecting the cars, we welded areas of the cages that were at issue, and brought the cars into compliance with the rules. We appreciated the opportunity to help with these terrific cars, and can't wait to see them at more NASA and PCA events!
 
Frenetic Racing 911 RSRs

John and Alexandra brought their beautiful 911 RSRs to Hanksville for cage upgrades. The existing cages had been built by an out-of-state shop, but there were some issues with the cages that John and Alexandra wanted to have addressed. After carefully inspecting the cars, we welded areas of the cages that were at issue, and brought the cars into compliance with the rules. We appreciated the opportunity to help with these terrific cars, and can't wait to see them at more NASA and PCA events!
 
Steve’s 911 SC

Steve, a club racer with the Porsche Club of America, decided to go racing with NASA as well. With the first event of the season rapidly approaching, he needed door bars fitted to his existing cage to make the car legal for racing in NASA.

We constructed the bars from 1.5"x.120" DOM, adding custom bends to wrap the bars around the seat and to allow maximum room in the drivers compartment. We fitted the bars over and under the stock armrests to allow Steve to keep the factory door pulls and locks.

This is a great car and we were very happy to help Steve to get on the track for his first NASA race!

 
Steve’s 911 SC

Steve, a club racer with the Porsche Club of America, decided to go racing with NASA as well. With the first event of the season rapidly approaching, he needed door bars fitted to his existing cage to make the car legal for racing in NASA.

We constructed the bars from 1.5"x.120" DOM, adding custom bends to wrap the bars around the seat and to allow maximum room in the drivers compartment. We fitted the bars over and under the stock armrests to allow Steve to keep the factory door pulls and locks.

This is a great car and we were very happy to help Steve to get on the track for his first NASA race!

 
Steve’s 911 SC

Steve, a club racer with the Porsche Club of America, decided to go racing with NASA as well. With the first event of the season rapidly approaching, he needed door bars fitted to his existing cage to make the car legal for racing in NASA.

We constructed the bars from 1.5"x.120" DOM, adding custom bends to wrap the bars around the seat and to allow maximum room in the drivers compartment. We fitted the bars over and under the stock armrests to allow Steve to keep the factory door pulls and locks.

This is a great car and we were very happy to help Steve to get on the track for his first NASA race!

 
Steve’s 911 SC

Steve, a club racer with the Porsche Club of America, decided to go racing with NASA as well. With the first event of the season rapidly approaching, he needed door bars fitted to his existing cage to make the car legal for racing in NASA.

We constructed the bars from 1.5"x.120" DOM, adding custom bends to wrap the bars around the seat and to allow maximum room in the drivers compartment. We fitted the bars over and under the stock armrests to allow Steve to keep the factory door pulls and locks.

This is a great car and we were very happy to help Steve to get on the track for his first NASA race!

 
Steve’s 911 SC

Steve, a club racer with the Porsche Club of America, decided to go racing with NASA as well. With the first event of the season rapidly approaching, he needed door bars fitted to his existing cage to make the car legal for racing in NASA.

We constructed the bars from 1.5"x.120" DOM, adding custom bends to wrap the bars around the seat and to allow maximum room in the drivers compartment. We fitted the bars over and under the stock armrests to allow Steve to keep the factory door pulls and locks.

This is a great car and we were very happy to help Steve to get on the track for his first NASA race!

 

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