Projects  >  Roll Bar & Cage Projects  >  Road Race Cars
Road Race Cage Projects

We have built great-fitting, race-proven cages for racers in road race classes such as 944-Spec and Spec-944, Camaro-Mustang Challenge, American Iron, Honda Challenge, Spec Miata, GTS, Spec E30, PT, Showroom Stock, Time Trials and others.

Porsche 944-Spec / Spec-944 / 944 Challenge racers: We have built over 25 cages for 944-Spec cars, and are happy to sponsor the NASA Rocky Mountain 944-Spec series.
Click if you’re looking for Porsche 944 cages.

Camaro-Mustang Challenge and American Iron racers: We also sponsor the NASA Rocky Mountain Camaro-Mustang Challenge series. Click to see CMC and AI cages.

German Touring Sportscars and Porsche Club racers: We have fabricated roll bars and cages for Porsche 911s, many 944s, 951s, a Porsche 968, BMWs, a VW R32, a Porsche Boxster and a brand-new Porsche Cayman S. Click for GTS and Porsche Club cages.

Scroll down to see other examples of our work.


Zung’s BMW

It was entertaining to have Zung's 4-door, daily-driver BMW in the shop for a custom-fitted 4-point roll bar. Every visitor to the shop asked why someone would want a roll bar in a car like this, but we enjoyed telling them that Zung is an experienced driver who regularly competes in NASA time trial and BMW Club events.

Zung asked us to build a great-fitting, structural roll bar that would be removeable, allowing him to remove and replace the bar. The fact that this car has 4-doors made this mission somewhat difficult, since the doors are shorter than they would be on a 2-door car. We also wanted to make this bar fit as well as all of our custom-fitted bars and cages, which meant that there would be little space to fit the bar inside the door opening. After careful planning and attention to detail, the end-result is a great-fitting bar that maximizes driver headroom, but is still removeable for everyday driving.

This bar was made from 1.75" x .120" DOM mild steel tube, and includes a diagonal bar as well as driver-side and passenger-side harness bars. We CADed and plasma-cut the mounting plate system, which features threaded lower plates that are welded to the rockers and rear bulkhead of the car. The bar is welded to upper plates which feature alignment holes that fit onto the lower plates, allowing the bar to be bolted-into structural areas of the car while still being removeable.

While the car was in the shop, Zung asked us to fabricate custom harness mounts and a fire extinguisher mount on the bar. 

 

Zung’s BMW

It was entertaining to have Zung's 4-door, daily-driver BMW in the shop for a custom-fitted 4-point roll bar. Every visitor to the shop asked why someone would want a roll bar in a car like this, but we enjoyed telling them that Zung is an experienced driver who regularly competes in NASA time trial and BMW Club events.

Zung asked us to build a great-fitting, structural roll bar that would be removeable, allowing him to remove and replace the bar. The fact that this car has 4-doors made this mission somewhat difficult, since the doors are shorter than they would be on a 2-door car. We also wanted to make this bar fit as well as all of our custom-fitted bars and cages, which meant that there would be little space to fit the bar inside the door opening. After careful planning and attention to detail, the end-result is a great-fitting bar that maximizes driver headroom, but is still removeable for everyday driving.

This bar was made from 1.75" x .120" DOM mild steel tube, and includes a diagonal bar as well as driver-side and passenger-side harness bars. We CADed and plasma-cut the mounting plate system, which features threaded lower plates that are welded to the rockers and rear bulkhead of the car. The bar is welded to upper plates which feature alignment holes that fit onto the lower plates, allowing the bar to be bolted-into structural areas of the car while still being removeable.

While the car was in the shop, Zung asked us to fabricate custom harness mounts and a fire extinguisher mount on the bar. 

 

Zung’s BMW

It was entertaining to have Zung's 4-door, daily-driver BMW in the shop for a custom-fitted 4-point roll bar. Every visitor to the shop asked why someone would want a roll bar in a car like this, but we enjoyed telling them that Zung is an experienced driver who regularly competes in NASA time trial and BMW Club events.

Zung asked us to build a great-fitting, structural roll bar that would be removeable, allowing him to remove and replace the bar. The fact that this car has 4-doors made this mission somewhat difficult, since the doors are shorter than they would be on a 2-door car. We also wanted to make this bar fit as well as all of our custom-fitted bars and cages, which meant that there would be little space to fit the bar inside the door opening. After careful planning and attention to detail, the end-result is a great-fitting bar that maximizes driver headroom, but is still removeable for everyday driving.

This bar was made from 1.75" x .120" DOM mild steel tube, and includes a diagonal bar as well as driver-side and passenger-side harness bars. We CADed and plasma-cut the mounting plate system, which features threaded lower plates that are welded to the rockers and rear bulkhead of the car. The bar is welded to upper plates which feature alignment holes that fit onto the lower plates, allowing the bar to be bolted-into structural areas of the car while still being removeable.

While the car was in the shop, Zung asked us to fabricate custom harness mounts and a fire extinguisher mount on the bar. 

 

Zung’s BMW

It was entertaining to have Zung's 4-door, daily-driver BMW in the shop for a custom-fitted 4-point roll bar. Every visitor to the shop asked why someone would want a roll bar in a car like this, but we enjoyed telling them that Zung is an experienced driver who regularly competes in NASA time trial and BMW Club events.

Zung asked us to build a great-fitting, structural roll bar that would be removeable, allowing him to remove and replace the bar. The fact that this car has 4-doors made this mission somewhat difficult, since the doors are shorter than they would be on a 2-door car. We also wanted to make this bar fit as well as all of our custom-fitted bars and cages, which meant that there would be little space to fit the bar inside the door opening. After careful planning and attention to detail, the end-result is a great-fitting bar that maximizes driver headroom, but is still removeable for everyday driving.

This bar was made from 1.75" x .120" DOM mild steel tube, and includes a diagonal bar as well as driver-side and passenger-side harness bars. We CADed and plasma-cut the mounting plate system, which features threaded lower plates that are welded to the rockers and rear bulkhead of the car. The bar is welded to upper plates which feature alignment holes that fit onto the lower plates, allowing the bar to be bolted-into structural areas of the car while still being removeable.

While the car was in the shop, Zung asked us to fabricate custom harness mounts and a fire extinguisher mount on the bar. 

 

Zung’s BMW

It was entertaining to have Zung's 4-door, daily-driver BMW in the shop for a custom-fitted 4-point roll bar. Every visitor to the shop asked why someone would want a roll bar in a car like this, but we enjoyed telling them that Zung is an experienced driver who regularly competes in NASA time trial and BMW Club events.

Zung asked us to build a great-fitting, structural roll bar that would be removeable, allowing him to remove and replace the bar. The fact that this car has 4-doors made this mission somewhat difficult, since the doors are shorter than they would be on a 2-door car. We also wanted to make this bar fit as well as all of our custom-fitted bars and cages, which meant that there would be little space to fit the bar inside the door opening. After careful planning and attention to detail, the end-result is a great-fitting bar that maximizes driver headroom, but is still removeable for everyday driving.

This bar was made from 1.75" x .120" DOM mild steel tube, and includes a diagonal bar as well as driver-side and passenger-side harness bars. We CADed and plasma-cut the mounting plate system, which features threaded lower plates that are welded to the rockers and rear bulkhead of the car. The bar is welded to upper plates which feature alignment holes that fit onto the lower plates, allowing the bar to be bolted-into structural areas of the car while still being removeable.

While the car was in the shop, Zung asked us to fabricate custom harness mounts and a fire extinguisher mount on the bar. 

 

Zung’s BMW

It was entertaining to have Zung's 4-door, daily-driver BMW in the shop for a custom-fitted 4-point roll bar. Every visitor to the shop asked why someone would want a roll bar in a car like this, but we enjoyed telling them that Zung is an experienced driver who regularly competes in NASA time trial and BMW Club events.

Zung asked us to build a great-fitting, structural roll bar that would be removeable, allowing him to remove and replace the bar. The fact that this car has 4-doors made this mission somewhat difficult, since the doors are shorter than they would be on a 2-door car. We also wanted to make this bar fit as well as all of our custom-fitted bars and cages, which meant that there would be little space to fit the bar inside the door opening. After careful planning and attention to detail, the end-result is a great-fitting bar that maximizes driver headroom, but is still removeable for everyday driving.

This bar was made from 1.75" x .120" DOM mild steel tube, and includes a diagonal bar as well as driver-side and passenger-side harness bars. We CADed and plasma-cut the mounting plate system, which features threaded lower plates that are welded to the rockers and rear bulkhead of the car. The bar is welded to upper plates which feature alignment holes that fit onto the lower plates, allowing the bar to be bolted-into structural areas of the car while still being removeable.

While the car was in the shop, Zung asked us to fabricate custom harness mounts and a fire extinguisher mount on the bar. 

 


Zung’s BMW

It was entertaining to have Zung's 4-door, daily-driver BMW in the shop for a custom-fitted 4-point roll bar. Every visitor to the shop asked why someone would want a roll bar in a car like this, but we enjoyed telling them that Zung is an experienced driver who regularly competes in NASA time trial and BMW Club events.

Zung asked us to build a great-fitting, structural roll bar that would be removeable, allowing him to remove and replace the bar. The fact that this car has 4-doors made this mission somewhat difficult, since the doors are shorter than they would be on a 2-door car. We also wanted to make this bar fit as well as all of our custom-fitted bars and cages, which meant that there would be little space to fit the bar inside the door opening. After careful planning and attention to detail, the end-result is a great-fitting bar that maximizes driver headroom, but is still removeable for everyday driving.

This bar was made from 1.75" x .120" DOM mild steel tube, and includes a diagonal bar as well as driver-side and passenger-side harness bars. We CADed and plasma-cut the mounting plate system, which features threaded lower plates that are welded to the rockers and rear bulkhead of the car. The bar is welded to upper plates which feature alignment holes that fit onto the lower plates, allowing the bar to be bolted-into structural areas of the car while still being removeable.

While the car was in the shop, Zung asked us to fabricate custom harness mounts and a fire extinguisher mount on the bar. 

 

Matt’s C5 Corvette

Matt time-trials his C5 Corvette, and is in the process of turning it into a track-only car. He asked us to build a roll bar that would provide more safety and would serve as a strong foundation for later turning it into a full cage.

Matt chose to have the cage made from 1.75" x .120" DOM mild steel. After reviewing various Corvette roll bar and cage designs with Matt, he asked us to attach the main hoop to the floor behind the seats. This area features a narrow strip or steel which serves as the rear support for the seats and for the fiberglass and balsa wood floor. Since we wanted to make the bar as structural as possible, we decided to weld 1" x 2" rectangular tube across this area, to tie the outer frame rail to the center tunnel. We welded 1/8" plates to the frame rails and tunnel, and to the rear bulkhead, and then welded the rectangular tube to these plates to help distribute loads across a greater surface area.

The main hoop features four bends, with rotations in the first and fourth bends to allow the hoop to follow the contour of the rear bulkhead, providing a great fit. The two-piece main hoop diagonal also follows this contour, allowing it to lie within the plane of the main hoop, in compliance with NASA rules. We trimmed the plastic headliner to allow the main hoop to tuck up close to the roofline.

We welded 1/8" plates to the rear subframes and then attached the rear braces. To further strengthen the bar, we added NHRA-style "D" gusset bars that attach the middle of the main hoop sides to the rectangular tube near the center tunnel.

This bar fits great and is more structural than the typical bolt-in bar found in most Corvettes, and its design allows it to be converted to a cage at a later date if Matt so chooses. Thanks, Matt, for the opportunity to help you with this time trial car!

 


Matt’s C5 Corvette

Matt time-trials his C5 Corvette, and is in the process of turning it into a track-only car. He asked us to build a roll bar that would provide more safety and would serve as a strong foundation for later turning it into a full cage.

Matt chose to have the cage made from 1.75" x .120" DOM mild steel. After reviewing various Corvette roll bar and cage designs with Matt, he asked us to attach the main hoop to the floor behind the seats. This area features a narrow strip or steel which serves as the rear support for the seats and for the fiberglass and balsa wood floor. Since we wanted to make the bar as structural as possible, we decided to weld 1" x 2" rectangular tube across this area, to tie the outer frame rail to the center tunnel. We welded 1/8" plates to the frame rails and tunnel, and to the rear bulkhead, and then welded the rectangular tube to these plates to help distribute loads across a greater surface area.

The main hoop features four bends, with rotations in the first and fourth bends to allow the hoop to follow the contour of the rear bulkhead, providing a great fit. The two-piece main hoop diagonal also follows this contour, allowing it to lie within the plane of the main hoop, in compliance with NASA rules. We trimmed the plastic headliner to allow the main hoop to tuck up close to the roofline.

We welded 1/8" plates to the rear subframes and then attached the rear braces. To further strengthen the bar, we added NHRA-style "D" gusset bars that attach the middle of the main hoop sides to the rectangular tube near the center tunnel.

This bar fits great and is more structural than the typical bolt-in bar found in most Corvettes, and its design allows it to be converted to a cage at a later date if Matt so chooses. Thanks, Matt, for the opportunity to help you with this time trial car!
 
Matt’s C5 Corvette

Matt time-trials his C5 Corvette, and is in the process of turning it into a track-only car. He asked us to build a roll bar that would provide more safety and would serve as a strong foundation for later turning it into a full cage.

Matt chose to have the cage made from 1.75" x .120" DOM mild steel. After reviewing various Corvette roll bar and cage designs with Matt, he asked us to attach the main hoop to the floor behind the seats. This area features a narrow strip or steel which serves as the rear support for the seats and for the fiberglass and balsa wood floor. Since we wanted to make the bar as structural as possible, we decided to weld 1" x 2" rectangular tube across this area, to tie the outer frame rail to the center tunnel. We welded 1/8" plates to the frame rails and tunnel, and to the rear bulkhead, and then welded the rectangular tube to these plates to help distribute loads across a greater surface area.

The main hoop features four bends, with rotations in the first and fourth bends to allow the hoop to follow the contour of the rear bulkhead, providing a great fit. The two-piece main hoop diagonal also follows this contour, allowing it to lie within the plane of the main hoop, in compliance with NASA rules. We trimmed the plastic headliner to allow the main hoop to tuck up close to the roofline.

We welded 1/8" plates to the rear subframes and then attached the rear braces. To further strengthen the bar, we added NHRA-style "D" gusset bars that attach the middle of the main hoop sides to the rectangular tube near the center tunnel.

This bar fits great and is more structural than the typical bolt-in bar found in most Corvettes, and its design allows it to be converted to a cage at a later date if Matt so chooses. Thanks, Matt, for the opportunity to help you with this time trial car!
 
Matt’s C5 Corvette

Matt time-trials his C5 Corvette, and is in the process of turning it into a track-only car. He asked us to build a roll bar that would provide more safety and would serve as a strong foundation for later turning it into a full cage.

Matt chose to have the cage made from 1.75" x .120" DOM mild steel. After reviewing various Corvette roll bar and cage designs with Matt, he asked us to attach the main hoop to the floor behind the seats. This area features a narrow strip or steel which serves as the rear support for the seats and for the fiberglass and balsa wood floor. Since we wanted to make the bar as structural as possible, we decided to weld 1" x 2" rectangular tube across this area, to tie the outer frame rail to the center tunnel. We welded 1/8" plates to the frame rails and tunnel, and to the rear bulkhead, and then welded the rectangular tube to these plates to help distribute loads across a greater surface area.

The main hoop features four bends, with rotations in the first and fourth bends to allow the hoop to follow the contour of the rear bulkhead, providing a great fit. The two-piece main hoop diagonal also follows this contour, allowing it to lie within the plane of the main hoop, in compliance with NASA rules. We trimmed the plastic headliner to allow the main hoop to tuck up close to the roofline.

We welded 1/8" plates to the rear subframes and then attached the rear braces. To further strengthen the bar, we added NHRA-style "D" gusset bars that attach the middle of the main hoop sides to the rectangular tube near the center tunnel.

This bar fits great and is more structural than the typical bolt-in bar found in most Corvettes, and its design allows it to be converted to a cage at a later date if Matt so chooses. Thanks, Matt, for the opportunity to help you with this time trial car!
 
Matt’s C5 Corvette

Matt time-trials his C5 Corvette, and is in the process of turning it into a track-only car. He asked us to build a roll bar that would provide more safety and would serve as a strong foundation for later turning it into a full cage.

Matt chose to have the cage made from 1.75" x .120" DOM mild steel. After reviewing various Corvette roll bar and cage designs with Matt, he asked us to attach the main hoop to the floor behind the seats. This area features a narrow strip or steel which serves as the rear support for the seats and for the fiberglass and balsa wood floor. Since we wanted to make the bar as structural as possible, we decided to weld 1" x 2" rectangular tube across this area, to tie the outer frame rail to the center tunnel. We welded 1/8" plates to the frame rails and tunnel, and to the rear bulkhead, and then welded the rectangular tube to these plates to help distribute loads across a greater surface area.

The main hoop features four bends, with rotations in the first and fourth bends to allow the hoop to follow the contour of the rear bulkhead, providing a great fit. The two-piece main hoop diagonal also follows this contour, allowing it to lie within the plane of the main hoop, in compliance with NASA rules. We trimmed the plastic headliner to allow the main hoop to tuck up close to the roofline.

We welded 1/8" plates to the rear subframes and then attached the rear braces. To further strengthen the bar, we added NHRA-style "D" gusset bars that attach the middle of the main hoop sides to the rectangular tube near the center tunnel.

This bar fits great and is more structural than the typical bolt-in bar found in most Corvettes, and its design allows it to be converted to a cage at a later date if Matt so chooses. Thanks, Matt, for the opportunity to help you with this time trial car!
 
Matt’s C5 Corvette

Matt time-trials his C5 Corvette, and is in the process of turning it into a track-only car. He asked us to build a roll bar that would provide more safety and would serve as a strong foundation for later turning it into a full cage.

Matt chose to have the cage made from 1.75" x .120" DOM mild steel. After reviewing various Corvette roll bar and cage designs with Matt, he asked us to attach the main hoop to the floor behind the seats. This area features a narrow strip or steel which serves as the rear support for the seats and for the fiberglass and balsa wood floor. Since we wanted to make the bar as structural as possible, we decided to weld 1" x 2" rectangular tube across this area, to tie the outer frame rail to the center tunnel. We welded 1/8" plates to the frame rails and tunnel, and to the rear bulkhead, and then welded the rectangular tube to these plates to help distribute loads across a greater surface area.

The main hoop features four bends, with rotations in the first and fourth bends to allow the hoop to follow the contour of the rear bulkhead, providing a great fit. The two-piece main hoop diagonal also follows this contour, allowing it to lie within the plane of the main hoop, in compliance with NASA rules. We trimmed the plastic headliner to allow the main hoop to tuck up close to the roofline.

We welded 1/8" plates to the rear subframes and then attached the rear braces. To further strengthen the bar, we added NHRA-style "D" gusset bars that attach the middle of the main hoop sides to the rectangular tube near the center tunnel.

This bar fits great and is more structural than the typical bolt-in bar found in most Corvettes, and its design allows it to be converted to a cage at a later date if Matt so chooses. Thanks, Matt, for the opportunity to help you with this time trial car!
 
Tom’s SN95 Mustang

Tom’s SN95 Mustang has a Vortech blower and gets driven on road courses in various events. Tom asked us to install a roll bar that would give him an added degree of safety and would also be legal for open-road events like the Silver State Classic. Based on the SSC requirements for his expected speed, this roll bar follows NHRA rules and features removeable door bars and additional X bracing inside the main hoop.

We used DOM tube for this roll bar, which was custom-fitted to Tom’s driving position.

Notice how the main hoop follows the contour of the car’s B pillar, and how tightly the rear braces follow the curve of the roof and rear window? We take care to create a roll bar that is not only sturdy and NHRA-legal, but also enhances the appearance of the car.

This level of fitment takes time and care, since the tubes are so close to (yet not touching) the headliner and interior trim. This is just one example of the level of effort and customization that we put into our customers’ projects!

 


Tom’s SN95 Mustang

Tom’s SN95 Mustang has a Vortech blower and gets driven on road courses in various events. Tom asked us to install a roll bar that would give him an added degree of safety and would also be legal for open-road events like the Silver State Classic. Based on the SSC requirements for his expected speed, this roll bar follows NHRA rules and features removeable door bars and additional X bracing inside the main hoop.

We used DOM tube for this roll bar, which was custom-fitted to Tom’s driving position.

Notice how the main hoop follows the contour of the car’s B pillar, and how tightly the rear braces follow the curve of the roof and rear window? We take care to create a roll bar that is not only sturdy and NHRA-legal, but also enhances the appearance of the car.

This level of fitment takes time and care, since the tubes are so close to (yet not touching) the headliner and interior trim. This is just one example of the level of effort and customization that we put into our customers’ projects!

 


Tom’s SN95 Mustang

Tom’s SN95 Mustang has a Vortech blower and gets driven on road courses in various events. Tom asked us to install a roll bar that would give him an added degree of safety and would also be legal for open-road events like the Silver State Classic. Based on the SSC requirements for his expected speed, this roll bar follows NHRA rules and features removeable door bars and additional X bracing inside the main hoop.

We used DOM tube for this roll bar, which was custom-fitted to Tom’s driving position.

Notice how the main hoop follows the contour of the car’s B pillar, and how tightly the rear braces follow the curve of the roof and rear window? We take care to create a roll bar that is not only sturdy and NHRA-legal, but also enhances the appearance of the car.

This level of fitment takes time and care, since the tubes are so close to (yet not touching) the headliner and interior trim. This is just one example of the level of effort and customization that we put into our customers’ projects!

 


Whit’s Acura

Whit regularly drives in High Performance Driver Education (HPDE) events with the NASA Rocky Mountain Region. After driving his Acura in HPDE, he recently decided to have it built to Honda Challenge rules. He chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build the roll cage for this race car.

Whit first asked us to remove the stock seat mounts and to add bracing for the race seats and harnesses. This bracing, fabricated from rectangular tube and welded to the floor and rocker panels using 1/8" plate, allows seat adjustment while serving as a stronger foundation than the factory floor.

Similar to other NASA cages that we have fabricated, we fabricated a custom mount for the battery cutoff switch. We also installed the window net and right-side driver restraint for Whit.

The cage features additional cross-bracing in the rear and halo, as well as a dash bar. These additional tubes add more strength to the cage and also stiffen the chassis. NASCAR-style door bars were used on both the driver and passenger sides, and the rear strut area also received a cross-brace.

Whit had a great vision for this cage, and communicated his needs and expectations to us from the very start of the project. We listened and were happy to have him involved at every step of the fabrication process. These add-ons provide another example of the Hanksville Hot Rods advantage - we listen to our customers, we custom fit the cage to your driving position, and  take great pride and care in our work. You won’t get this level of quality and customization from a generic mail-order cage!

 


Whit’s Acura

Whit regularly drives in High Performance Driver Education (HPDE) events with the NASA Rocky Mountain Region. After driving his Acura in HPDE, he recently decided to have it built to Honda Challenge rules. He chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build the roll cage for this race car.

Whit first asked us to remove the stock seat mounts and to add bracing for the race seats and harnesses. This bracing, fabricated from rectangular tube and welded to the floor and rocker panels using 1/8" plate, allows seat adjustment while serving as a stronger foundation than the factory floor.

Similar to other NASA cages that we have fabricated, we fabricated a custom mount for the battery cutoff switch. We also installed the window net and right-side driver restraint for Whit.

The cage features additional cross-bracing in the rear and halo, as well as a dash bar. These additional tubes add more strength to the cage and also stiffen the chassis. NASCAR-style door bars were used on both the driver and passenger sides, and the rear strut area also received a cross-brace.

Whit had a great vision for this cage, and communicated his needs and expectations to us from the very start of the project. We listened and were happy to have him involved at every step of the fabrication process. These add-ons provide another example of the Hanksville Hot Rods advantage - we listen to our customers, we custom fit the cage to your driving position, and  take great pride and care in our work. You won’t get this level of quality and customization from a generic mail-order cage!

 
Whit’s Acura

Whit regularly drives in High Performance Driver Education (HPDE) events with the NASA Rocky Mountain Region. After driving his Acura in HPDE, he recently decided to have it built to Honda Challenge rules. He chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build the roll cage for this race car.

Whit first asked us to remove the stock seat mounts and to add bracing for the race seats and harnesses. This bracing, fabricated from rectangular tube and welded to the floor and rocker panels using 1/8" plate, allows seat adjustment while serving as a stronger foundation than the factory floor.

Similar to other NASA cages that we have fabricated, we fabricated a custom mount for the battery cutoff switch. We also installed the window net and right-side driver restraint for Whit.

The cage features additional cross-bracing in the rear and halo, as well as a dash bar. These additional tubes add more strength to the cage and also stiffen the chassis. NASCAR-style door bars were used on both the driver and passenger sides, and the rear strut area also received a cross-brace.

Whit had a great vision for this cage, and communicated his needs and expectations to us from the very start of the project. We listened and were happy to have him involved at every step of the fabrication process. These add-ons provide another example of the Hanksville Hot Rods advantage - we listen to our customers, we custom fit the cage to your driving position, and  take great pride and care in our work. You won’t get this level of quality and customization from a generic mail-order cage!

 


Whit’s Acura

Whit regularly drives in High Performance Driver Education (HPDE) events with the NASA Rocky Mountain Region. After driving his Acura in HPDE, he recently decided to have it built to Honda Challenge rules. He chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build the roll cage for this race car.

Whit first asked us to remove the stock seat mounts and to add bracing for the race seats and harnesses. This bracing, fabricated from rectangular tube and welded to the floor and rocker panels using 1/8" plate, allows seat adjustment while serving as a stronger foundation than the factory floor.

Similar to other NASA cages that we have fabricated, we fabricated a custom mount for the battery cutoff switch. We also installed the window net and right-side driver restraint for Whit.

The cage features additional cross-bracing in the rear and halo, as well as a dash bar. These additional tubes add more strength to the cage and also stiffen the chassis. NASCAR-style door bars were used on both the driver and passenger sides, and the rear strut area also received a cross-brace.

Whit had a great vision for this cage, and communicated his needs and expectations to us from the very start of the project. We listened and were happy to have him involved at every step of the fabrication process. These add-ons provide another example of the Hanksville Hot Rods advantage - we listen to our customers, we custom fit the cage to your driving position, and  take great pride and care in our work. You won’t get this level of quality and customization from a generic mail-order cage!

 
Whit’s Acura

Whit regularly drives in High Performance Driver Education (HPDE) events with the NASA Rocky Mountain Region. After driving his Acura in HPDE, he recently decided to have it built to Honda Challenge rules. He chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build the roll cage for this race car.

Whit first asked us to remove the stock seat mounts and to add bracing for the race seats and harnesses. This bracing, fabricated from rectangular tube and welded to the floor and rocker panels using 1/8" plate, allows seat adjustment while serving as a stronger foundation than the factory floor.

Similar to other NASA cages that we have fabricated, we fabricated a custom mount for the battery cutoff switch. We also installed the window net and right-side driver restraint for Whit.

The cage features additional cross-bracing in the rear and halo, as well as a dash bar. These additional tubes add more strength to the cage and also stiffen the chassis. NASCAR-style door bars were used on both the driver and passenger sides, and the rear strut area also received a cross-brace.

Whit had a great vision for this cage, and communicated his needs and expectations to us from the very start of the project. We listened and were happy to have him involved at every step of the fabrication process. These add-ons provide another example of the Hanksville Hot Rods advantage - we listen to our customers, we custom fit the cage to your driving position, and  take great pride and care in our work. You won’t get this level of quality and customization from a generic mail-order cage!

 


Whit’s Acura

Whit regularly drives in High Performance Driver Education (HPDE) events with the NASA Rocky Mountain Region. After driving his Acura in HPDE, he recently decided to have it built to Honda Challenge rules. He chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build the roll cage for this race car.

Whit first asked us to remove the stock seat mounts and to add bracing for the race seats and harnesses. This bracing, fabricated from rectangular tube and welded to the floor and rocker panels using 1/8" plate, allows seat adjustment while serving as a stronger foundation than the factory floor.

Similar to other NASA cages that we have fabricated, we fabricated a custom mount for the battery cutoff switch. We also installed the window net and right-side driver restraint for Whit.

The cage features additional cross-bracing in the rear and halo, as well as a dash bar. These additional tubes add more strength to the cage and also stiffen the chassis. NASCAR-style door bars were used on both the driver and passenger sides, and the rear strut area also received a cross-brace.

Whit had a great vision for this cage, and communicated his needs and expectations to us from the very start of the project. We listened and were happy to have him involved at every step of the fabrication process. These add-ons provide another example of the Hanksville Hot Rods advantage - we listen to our customers, we custom fit the cage to your driving position, and  take great pride and care in our work. You won’t get this level of quality and customization from a generic mail-order cage!

 
Whit’s Acura

Whit regularly drives in High Performance Driver Education (HPDE) events with the NASA Rocky Mountain Region. After driving his Acura in HPDE, he recently decided to have it built to Honda Challenge rules. He chose Hanksville Hot Rods to build the roll cage for this race car.

Whit first asked us to remove the stock seat mounts and to add bracing for the race seats and harnesses. This bracing, fabricated from rectangular tube and welded to the floor and rocker panels using 1/8" plate, allows seat adjustment while serving as a stronger foundation than the factory floor.

Similar to other NASA cages that we have fabricated, we fabricated a custom mount for the battery cutoff switch. We also installed the window net and right-side driver restraint for Whit.

The cage features additional cross-bracing in the rear and halo, as well as a dash bar. These additional tubes add more strength to the cage and also stiffen the chassis. NASCAR-style door bars were used on both the driver and passenger sides, and the rear strut area also received a cross-brace.

Whit had a great vision for this cage, and communicated his needs and expectations to us from the very start of the project. We listened and were happy to have him involved at every step of the fabrication process. These add-ons provide another example of the Hanksville Hot Rods advantage - we listen to our customers, we custom fit the cage to your driving position, and  take great pride and care in our work. You won’t get this level of quality and customization from a generic mail-order cage!

 
Bob’s Spec Miata

After running his Miata in the NASA HPDE groups, Bob decided to go to comp school and to turn his car into a Spec Miata racer.

After measuring how Bob sat in the car, we determined the bend angles and placement using our software, programmed our bender, and bent and notched the tubes. Since the Miata is a small car, it is important to maximize space for the driver wherever possible. Therefore, we fitted the main hoop as high as possible (while still allowing the top to be installed), fitted the forward hoops right against the "A" pillars, and tucked the windshield bar as close as possible to the windshield. As with most of our NASA cages, Bob asked us to install NASCAR-style door bars.

Once the tubes were fitted and tacked in place, we asked Bob to sit inside the car in his driving position to ensure that he would be comfortable.After the final fitment was complete, we MIG-welded the tubes and installed the mount for the battery cutoff switch, window net and seat back brace.

 
Bob’s Spec Miata

After running his Miata in the NASA HPDE groups, Bob decided to go to comp school and to turn his car into a Spec Miata racer.

After measuring how Bob sat in the car, we determined the bend angles and placement using our software, programmed our bender, and bent and notched the tubes. Since the Miata is a small car, it is important to maximize space for the driver wherever possible. Therefore, we fitted the main hoop as high as possible (while still allowing the top to be installed), fitted the forward hoops right against the "A" pillars, and tucked the windshield bar as close as possible to the windshield. As with most of our NASA cages, Bob asked us to install NASCAR-style door bars.

Once the tubes were fitted and tacked in place, we asked Bob to sit inside the car in his driving position to ensure that he would be comfortable.After the final fitment was complete, we MIG-welded the tubes and installed the mount for the battery cutoff switch, window net and seat back brace.

 
Bob’s Spec Miata

After running his Miata in the NASA HPDE groups, Bob decided to go to comp school and to turn his car into a Spec Miata racer.

After measuring how Bob sat in the car, we determined the bend angles and placement using our software, programmed our bender, and bent and notched the tubes. Since the Miata is a small car, it is important to maximize space for the driver wherever possible. Therefore, we fitted the main hoop as high as possible (while still allowing the top to be installed), fitted the forward hoops right against the "A" pillars, and tucked the windshield bar as close as possible to the windshield. As with most of our NASA cages, Bob asked us to install NASCAR-style door bars.

Once the tubes were fitted and tacked in place, we asked Bob to sit inside the car in his driving position to ensure that he would be comfortable.After the final fitment was complete, we MIG-welded the tubes and installed the mount for the battery cutoff switch, window net and seat back brace.

 
Bob’s Spec Miata

After running his Miata in the NASA HPDE groups, Bob decided to go to comp school and to turn his car into a Spec Miata racer.

After measuring how Bob sat in the car, we determined the bend angles and placement using our software, programmed our bender, and bent and notched the tubes. Since the Miata is a small car, it is important to maximize space for the driver wherever possible. Therefore, we fitted the main hoop as high as possible (while still allowing the top to be installed), fitted the forward hoops right against the "A" pillars, and tucked the windshield bar as close as possible to the windshield. As with most of our NASA cages, Bob asked us to install NASCAR-style door bars.

Once the tubes were fitted and tacked in place, we asked Bob to sit inside the car in his driving position to ensure that he would be comfortable.After the final fitment was complete, we MIG-welded the tubes and installed the mount for the battery cutoff switch, window net and seat back brace.

 
Bob’s Spec Miata

After running his Miata in the NASA HPDE groups, Bob decided to go to comp school and to turn his car into a Spec Miata racer.

After measuring how Bob sat in the car, we determined the bend angles and placement using our software, programmed our bender, and bent and notched the tubes. Since the Miata is a small car, it is important to maximize space for the driver wherever possible. Therefore, we fitted the main hoop as high as possible (while still allowing the top to be installed), fitted the forward hoops right against the "A" pillars, and tucked the windshield bar as close as possible to the windshield. As with most of our NASA cages, Bob asked us to install NASCAR-style door bars.

Once the tubes were fitted and tacked in place, we asked Bob to sit inside the car in his driving position to ensure that he would be comfortable.After the final fitment was complete, we MIG-welded the tubes and installed the mount for the battery cutoff switch, window net and seat back brace.

 
Bob’s Spec Miata

After running his Miata in the NASA HPDE groups, Bob decided to go to comp school and to turn his car into a Spec Miata racer.

After measuring how Bob sat in the car, we determined the bend angles and placement using our software, programmed our bender, and bent and notched the tubes. Since the Miata is a small car, it is important to maximize space for the driver wherever possible. Therefore, we fitted the main hoop as high as possible (while still allowing the top to be installed), fitted the forward hoops right against the "A" pillars, and tucked the windshield bar as close as possible to the windshield. As with most of our NASA cages, Bob asked us to install NASCAR-style door bars.

Once the tubes were fitted and tacked in place, we asked Bob to sit inside the car in his driving position to ensure that he would be comfortable.After the final fitment was complete, we MIG-welded the tubes and installed the mount for the battery cutoff switch, window net and seat back brace.

 
Carolyn’s '06 Mini

This brand new car, with 8,700 miles and temporary tags, came to Webb Motorsports to be prepped for racing in the SCCA Showroom Stock class. Randy Webb hired us to install a cage for this purpose. Our goal when installing cages in full-interior cars is to have a minimal impact on the interior finish of the car, and to have the maximum driveability and comfort, while still complying with the sanctioning body rules.

This car was a challenge since it has a white interior headliner and pillar panels, but in the end the cage turned out well, the interior survived and we were even able to re-install the rear interior panels and the visors!

Thanks to Webb Motorsports for the opportunity to help with this great project.

 
Carolyn’s '06 Mini

This brand new car, with 8,700 miles and temporary tags, came to Webb Motorsports to be prepped for racing in the SCCA Showroom Stock class. Randy Webb hired us to install a cage for this purpose. Our goal when installing cages in full-interior cars is to have a minimal impact on the interior finish of the car, and to have the maximum driveability and comfort, while still complying with the sanctioning body rules.

This car was a challenge since it has a white interior headliner and pillar panels, but in the end the cage turned out well, the interior survived and we were even able to re-install the rear interior panels and the visors!

Thanks to Webb Motorsports for the opportunity to help with this great project.

 
Carolyn’s '06 Mini

This brand new car, with 8,700 miles and temporary tags, came to Webb Motorsports to be prepped for racing in the SCCA Showroom Stock class. Randy Webb hired us to install a cage for this purpose. Our goal when installing cages in full-interior cars is to have a minimal impact on the interior finish of the car, and to have the maximum driveability and comfort, while still complying with the sanctioning body rules.

This car was a challenge since it has a white interior headliner and pillar panels, but in the end the cage turned out well, the interior survived and we were even able to re-install the rear interior panels and the visors!

Thanks to Webb Motorsports for the opportunity to help with this great project.

 
Carolyn’s '06 Mini

This brand new car, with 8,700 miles and temporary tags, came to Webb Motorsports to be prepped for racing in the SCCA Showroom Stock class. Randy Webb hired us to install a cage for this purpose. Our goal when installing cages in full-interior cars is to have a minimal impact on the interior finish of the car, and to have the maximum driveability and comfort, while still complying with the sanctioning body rules.

This car was a challenge since it has a white interior headliner and pillar panels, but in the end the cage turned out well, the interior survived and we were even able to re-install the rear interior panels and the visors!

Thanks to Webb Motorsports for the opportunity to help with this great project.

 
Carolyn’s '06 Mini

This brand new car, with 8,700 miles and temporary tags, came to Webb Motorsports to be prepped for racing in the SCCA Showroom Stock class. Randy Webb hired us to install a cage for this purpose. Our goal when installing cages in full-interior cars is to have a minimal impact on the interior finish of the car, and to have the maximum driveability and comfort, while still complying with the sanctioning body rules.

This car was a challenge since it has a white interior headliner and pillar panels, but in the end the cage turned out well, the interior survived and we were even able to re-install the rear interior panels and the visors!

Thanks to Webb Motorsports for the opportunity to help with this great project.

 

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